Porter Rockwell – Bodyguard, Mountain Man, Pioneer, Friend

Mormon-Media-Network---Orin-Porter-RockwellEARLY LIFE

In 1817, due to several years of crop failure, the Rockwell family sold their farm in Massachusetts and moved to upstate New York. They settled near the town of Palmyra about a mile away from the Joseph Smith Sr. family.

Orrin Porter Rockwell was a childhood friend of Mormon leader Joseph Smith. On April 6, 1830, the 16 year old became the youngest member of the church, being part of the first group baptized the day the church was organized.

As a boy, Porter gathered berries and cut firewood which he would sell to raise money to help pay for the publishing of the Book of Mormon. This was particularly significant because he himself was illiterate and never able to read the book.

DEVOTED FRIEND TO THE PROPHET JOSEPH

In December 1838 Joseph Smith and a few associates were being held in the jail at Liberty, Missouri. The charges against them were spurious and the jail was miserably cold, cramped and filthy. Joseph asked his friend Porter to smuggle in some tools they might use to break out of the jail. Porter had been a nearly daily visitor to the jail, serving as a messenger between Joseph and Brigham Young. He was able to smuggle in tools, and the prisoners made good progress. However, when he attempted to smuggle in a replacement handle for a broken auger, Porter was discovered by the jailer.

Speaking of the hole they had been able to make in the jail wall before being discovered, Joseph said, “It was a fine hole. It will cost the county a round sum to repair it, and for that I am glad.”

FALSELY ACCUSED

On October 27, 1838 Missouri Governor Lilburn Williams Boggs issued Missouri Executive Order 44. The order, which became known as the “Extermination Order” called for the removal of Latter-day Saints from the state because of their,

“…open and avowed defiance of the laws, and of having made war upon the people of this State … the Mormons must be treated as enemies, and must be exterminated or driven from the State if necessary for the public peace—their outrages are beyond all description.”

The executive order escalated the tension between Mormons and other residents of Missouri and the Mormons eventually left the state.

On May 6, 1842 a would-be assassin shot former Governor Boggs in his home in Independence, Missouri. Suspicions were immediately cast on Joseph Smith and his unofficial bodyguard Porter Rockwell. A year after the assassination attempt, Rockwell was arrested. After 8 months in prison he was tried and acquitted of the charge. Many of Boggs’ supporters remained convinced that Rockwell was the man responsible.

Mormon-Media-Network-Porter-Rockwell-pony-express-station

Rockwell Station – Pony Express Trail

THE SAMPSON FACTOR

After 8 months in prison, Porter arrived at Joseph Smith’s home in Nauvoo, Illinois. Filthy and emaciated, he was not immediately recognized by those gathered at the home for a Christmas dinner. After his identity was confirmed, the Prophet welcomed him inside. Embracing him, the prophet said,

“I prophesy, in the name of the Lord, that you — Orrin Porter Rockwell — so long as ye shall remain loyal and true to thy faith, need fear no enemy. Cut not thy hair and no bullet or blade can harm thee.”

Years later, upon hearing that Agnes Coolbrith Smith Pickett, widow of Joseph Smith’s brother Don Carlos, had lost her hair as a result of typhoid fever, Rockwell cut his hair to make a wig.

MINING MINERS

Rockwell was in California during the gold rush. He tried his luck at panning for gold and quickly realized he was not going to get rich doing it. Instead, he built a hotel and general store and collected the gold from miners after they had panned it.

Mormon-Media-Network---Proter-Rockwell---Grave-markerTHE MAN WHO COULD NOT BE KILLED

Because of Joseph Smith’s prophecy, Rockwell became known as the man who could not be killed. As a result, he became the target of many outlaws looking to make a name for themselves.

As with many legends, the stories get distorted and even run to the absurd. He was not a “hit man” for Brigham Young sent to kill less-valiant Mormons. He was not a vigilante hell bent on avenging victims of the extermination order. He was a pioneer, scout, mountain man, husband, father, hotel owner, storeowner, Deputy US Marshal, and friend.

THE PASSING OF A LEGEND

Rockwell died of natural causes in June 1878. At his death, he had been a member of the church longer than anyone living at the time. He is buried in the Salt Lake City cemetery. His epitaph reads: “He was brave and loyal to his faith. True to the Prophet Jos. Smith. A promise made him by the prophet, through obedience it was fulfilled.”

 

Copyright © 2016 by Energy Media Works LLC

When using portions of this article, please credit: MormonMediaNetwork.com

If you have comments or questions, we would like to hear them. Just click on leave a comment below.

________________________________

 

 

This-is-the-marketplace---Porter-Rockwell-Key-Chain

You can find Porter Rockwell items at:

ThisIsTheMarketPlace.com

 

_________________________________

Image credits:

Porter Rockwell portraits – public domain

Rockwell grave marker – Wikimedia commons, The Epopt

Pony Express Marker — Castigate Media LLC

Porter Rockwell keychain — Old Nauvoo

Posted in Church History, Endurance, Friendship, Loyalty Tagged with: , , , , ,

Hidden Treasures in Palmyra

For Latter-day Saints there are many things to see in Palmyra, NY, such as the Joseph Smith Farm, the Sacred Grove and the Hill Cumorah. When Mormon families make the trek east they make their list and see them all. But there are a few other things to see that are worth your while.

Mormon-Media-Network HT-Palmyra-Historical-MuseumLOCAL MUSEUMS

Palmyra has a rich history dating back to the early 1700s and that history is brought to life in four great little museums. Three of them are located together on Market St. (right behind the Grandin building) and the third is just through the parking lot on William St. You can walk through all four of these museums in a couple hours or, as happens to many visitors, you may get caught up in the history and take much longer.

The staff is friendly and informed and able to point out things of interest to their Mormon visitors.

The Palmyra Historical Museum is a former hotel and has 23 themed rooms that tell the story of Palmyra’s 200-year influence on America. Everyone knows about Palmyra’s connection to Joseph Smith and the birth of Mormonism, but few people know about Palmyra’s connection to the Underground Railroad, Women’s Suffrage, or the Erie Canal. Former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill even had a family connection to Palmyra.

The Print Shop Museum displays some of the finest examples of early printing presses and equipment you’ll find in one location. In 1856 John M. Jones arrived in Palmyra and began producing printing equipment. Presses manufactured in Palmyra changed the printing business in America.

The Print Shop Museum is the perfect companion to the Grandin Building tour. See how the Book of Mormon was printed, then walk out the back door right to the Print Shop Museum and see how printing evolved over the decades that followed.

Mormon-Media-Network HT-Phelps-StoreThe Wm. Phelps General Store served as a tavern, bakery, boarding house and general store. William Phelps built the store in 1826. In 1940 his son Julius closed up shop. He didn’t have a going-out-of-business sale; he just locked the doors and walked away. Today walking through the front door is like walking into 1940. The items that were on the shelves when Julius walked away are still there. There is even a crate of eggs still sitting on the counter. It’s like The Twilight Zone, but in a really, really good way.

For Mormons, the Phelps store is an interesting visit because the Smith family would have shopped here between 1826 and 1830.

Mormon-Media-Network HT-Coverlet-MuseumThe largest collection of American hand woven coverlets is found in the Alling Coverlet Museum. The coverlets in this collection are truly beautiful works of art, intricately woven patterns in stunning colors. There are also many quilts on display which are a wonderful representation of that great American folk art. In addition to the many beautiful coverlets and quilts, the museum has looms, spinning wheels and other weaver’s tools. You’ll even see a dress worn by Julia Dent Grant when she and her husband President Ulysses S. Grant attended a ball in Palmyra.

An informative video presentation is available to learn more about the history and art of weaving. The gift shop has books, woven goods and unique gift ideas.

Mormon-Media-Network HT-Book-of-Mormon-artifactsBook of Mormon artifacts can be found in the Latter-day Harvest Bookstore on Main St.

Many scholars believe Book of Mormon events took place in North America. The Hill Cumorah in Palmyra is the Hill Cumorah of the Book of Mormon. The Finger Lakes region is the Land of Many Waters spoken of by Mormon.

Book of Mormon researcher and geographer Wayne May has loaned hundreds of artifacts to this display. It is a wonderful collection of arrowheads and spearheads, copper tools, effigy stones, and much more. The bookstore is located at 213 E. Main St., near the Grandin Building.

Mormon-Media-Network HT-Alvin-Smith-grave

PROMINENT GRAVES

If you have been to Palmyra you have probably been to Alvin Smith’s Grave on a small hill on Church Street. Many people wonder why Alvin was buried in such a small graveyard. This small hill was also the sight of the first Church in Palmyra (1811-1832), so the graveyard would have been connected to the church. This hill was also the location of the first school in Palmyra (1793-1805). If that’s the only cemetery you visit in town, you’re missing out.

The Palmyra City Cemetery is just a few blocks from Alvin Smith’s grave. This beautiful cemetery at 272 N. Vienna St. is the final resting place to several people important to LDS history. The small streets in the cemetery have clearly posted street names, making it easy to find graves.

Mormon Media Network HT Lucy Harris GraveLucy Harris, wife of Martin Harris, is one of the first graves you will come to. It is located next to the groundskeeper’s shed on the east side of the cemetery. Martin Harris mortgaged his farm to pay for the first printing of the Book of Mormon. Martin’s dedication to Joseph Smith and the church led to the couple’s separation.

E. B. Grandin and his wife Harriet are buried at Elm St. and Linden Ave. Mr. Grandin was the publisher of the first edition of the Book of Mormon in 1830. 5,000 copies were printed at a cost of $3,000. Grandin was the publisher of the Palmyra newspaper, the Wayne Sentinel. He died at a young age. He was barely 39.

Mormon-Media-Network-HT-Pliny-T-Sexton-gravePliny T. Sexton was a Palmyra banker who owned several properties in and around Palmyra including the Hill Cumorah. He once hosted a dinner party in Palmyra with Mark Twain as guest of honor. Although he was ruthless in business dealings, he had a soft spot for children and the less fortunate. He provided shoes to Palmyra’s needy children, and supported many other charitable causes. He bequeathed the city park to the village of Palmyra in the hope that it would promote “social unity, mutual improvement, general welfare and happiness.” Mr. Sexton is buried at Birch Dr. and Oak St.

Mormon-Media-Network HT-Pyllis-BeanPhyllis Bean — In 1915 newlyweds Willard and Rebecca Bean were called by President Joseph F. Smith to live in the Joseph Smith home and re-establish the church. Paul and Phyllis, children of Willard’s from a previous marriage, were teenagers when the family arrived in Palmyra. Phyllis passed away while the family was still in Palmyra. She is buried at Magnolia St. and Maple St.

Although not well known outside of Palmyra, the story of the Bean family is a favorite of missionaries and local church members. Phyllis’s grave is cared for by missionaries and there are always beautiful flowers at her headstone.

On your next trip to the birthplace of the Church, set aside a day for getting to know the beautiful and historic Village of Palmyra.

Copyright © 2015 by Energy Media Works LLC

When using portions of this article, please credit: MormonMediaNetwork.com

If you have comments or questions, we would like to hear them. Just click on leave a comment below.

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Image Credits: All photos by Energy Media Works LLC

 

Posted in Book of Mormon, Church History, Heritage, Palmyra Tagged with: , , , , , , ,

In Their Own Language

The following was posted in October, 2014. It has been updated to more accurately reflect 2015.

Mormon-Media-Network-Elder-Wong-Cantonese-Photo-by-Mormon-Newsroom

 

On Saturday morning, October 4, 2014, when Elder Chi Hong “Sam” Wong delivered his General Conference address in his native Cantonese, he did something that was a much bigger deal than many people realize.

To understand why this was such a momentous event we need to understand what goes on behind the scenes at general conference.

Every six months General Conference sessions are broadcast in approximately 95 languages. To make this happen, the following steps take place:

  • Scheduled speakers prepare and submit their talks 2-3 weeks in advance.
  • These talks are then reviewed for accuracy. For example, a scheduled speaker may have prepared a talk dealing with the dedication of the Kirtland temple and used 1833 as the year of the dedication. The correct year is 1836.
  • After being reviewed and needed corrections have been made, the text is then submitted to the Publishing Services Department where written translations (into the 94 broadcast languages) are made.
  • The translated text is delivered to the various interpreters who will be providing the language interpretation for the live broadcast.
  • The text is formatted for display on the teleprompter. The teleprompter projects a scrolling readout of the text onto large plates of glass, which are mounted in front of the three main cameras directed at the pulpit. This allows the speaker to read his or her text while looking up at the congregation or to look directly into the camera.
  • When the speaker steps up to the pulpit and begins delivering his message, the 93 interpreters, each in a sound booth in the conference center, begin following along in the language they are interpreting. * Because these interpreters are following along with the speaker standing at the pulpit, it is important that each interpreter be fluent in English in order to stay on track and not get ahead of the speaker or fall too far behind.
  • General Conference is broadcast with closed captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing. This captioning is provided in English and Spanish and occasionally other languages. The text needs to be formatted for those closed caption languages.

Mormon-Media-Network-Interpretors-Photo-by-Mormon-News-RoomAlthough these six steps are a simplified explanation of the process, it gives us a good understanding of the basic process.

Let’s now take a look at how this process is complicated when a speaker at the pulpit speaks a language other then English.

In the following process we will use Elder Wong as an example. However, the process is the same for anyone speaking a language other than English at the pulpit.

  • Elder Wong prepares his remarks in his native language.
  • He submits it for review. Before it can be reviewed, it must be translated into English because those doing the review do not read Cantonese.
  • The reviewed and corrected text is then submitted for translation into the 93 languages, which will be broadcast.
  • The text is formatted for the teleprompter. Keep in mind, the teleprompter is there for Elder Wong, therefore, it needs to be in Cantonese. It is also important to know that the teleprompter follows Elder Wong, Elder Wong does not follow the teleprompter. The teleprompter operator needs to scroll the text at Elder Wong’s pace. The teleprompter operator, who is expected to keep up with Elder Wong, does not speak or read Cantonese. To overcome this hurdle the teleprompter operator has a native Cantonese speaker sitting next to him following along with a pointer indicating where Elder Wong is in the text.
  • When Elder Wong steps up to the pulpit and begins speaking, the 93 interpreters follow along in the language they are interpreting. The challenge comes in the fact that Elder Wong is speaking Cantonese and the 93 interpreters do not speak Cantonese. This hurdle is overcome in this way. A person interprets Elder Wong’s address into English and this English interpretation is delivered to the ears of the 93 other interpreters who then interpret into their given languages. This English interpretation is also broadcast on the English satellite channels.
  • Another challenge is that Cantonese is the native language of few, if any, of those in attendance in the conference center. Therefore, an English translation needs to be projected on the screens in the hall. Again, the person providing that text most likely does not speak or read Cantonese and therefore needs to follow the English interpretation.
  • Closed captioning also needs to be broadcast in English, Spanish and other languages. Each person providing the captioning needs to follow, not Elder Wong at the pulpit (because they don’t speak Cantonese), but the English interpretation.

Mormon-Media-Network-Tagalog-box-Photo-by-Mormon-NewsroomWe have not even mentioned the engineers who make sure each language is routed to the correct satellite channel so Saints in Norway don’t get Navajo, and saints in Hong Kong actually hear Elder Wong’s voice.

This has been an over-simplified explanation of the interpretation process, but with hope it has helped you appreciate the dedication of hundreds of people who make General Conference look simple.

If you’re looking for latter-day miracles, you can find them in 94 languages every six months. Broadcasting the sessions of General Conference is not a simple thing. There are many major problems that could occur; yet it is rare for the viewing or listening audience to see or hear anything that doesn’t look flawless.

Mormon-Media-Network-In-Their-Own-Language-image-by-exemplumWhen King Benjamin in the Book of Mormon wanted to speak to God’s people he asked that a tower be built. From this tower he addressed the people. Today, the tower builders are the engineers, the interpreters, the camera operators, the audio engineers, the lighting people, the ushers, the secretaries, the gardeners, and many, many others who work with dedication to assure the message reaches God’s people.

It should be noted that although many of the interpreters are located in the conference center, some interpret live from locations around the world via Internet lines.

Mormon-Media-Network-D-and-C-90-11It’s not a stretch to say that the number of languages provided by the church for General Conference (usually 95) is far greater than any other organization. Although only six official languages are used at the United Nations, the process of the actual interpretation is similar to that used in the Conference Center. You can read about the interpretation at the UN here.

Copyright © 2015 by Energy Media Works LLC

When using portions of this article, please credit: MormonMediaNetwork.com

If you have comments or questions, we would like to hear them. Just click on leave a comment below.

________________________________

 Image Credits:

Satellite Dish photo by: Morguefile.com, exemplum

All other photos by: LDSNewsroom.org (LDS Church)

________________________________

Posted in General Conference Tagged with: , , , ,

A Life Forgotten

Alan Turing was a genius. He was a mathematician. He was a code breaker, a war hero, the father of the computer, the brain behind every desktop and hand-held device we have today. Alan Turing was a homosexual.

That last bit of information may seem trivial and even inappropriate. However, the fact that Alan Turing was homosexual is the very reason that you have probably never heard of him.

During World War II, England was losing and losing badly in the North Atlantic. German U-boats were controlling shipping and supply lanes. They were making the waters dangerous, if not impossible to navigate. The reason Germany was able to control the area is because they had a seemingly unbreakable code machine, the Enigma. This machine was a brilliantly designed, elegantly constructed and frustratingly complex device that allowed German U-boats to communicate in code and therefore move about the Atlantic undetected.

Eventually, England was able to obtain an Enigma. However, the brilliance of the Enigma was that its coding and decoding system could be changed at anytime and was changed at irritatingly frequent intervals by the Germans. Britain could receive coded messages through the Enigma, but because they didn’t know that day’s Enigma settings, they couldn’t decipher them. Finally being able to receive the messages was a huge step in the right direction, but they now needed a brilliant mind to figure out how to break the Enigma enigma. Alan Turing proved to be that mind. He developed a forerunner to today’s computer. This machine, called the Bombe, could decipher Enigma messages in a fraction of the time it would take a human with pencil and paper. The Germans were unaware Britain had obtained an Enigma and therefore believed their codes were unbreakable. This fact gave Britain the tactical advantage and it is not an overstatement to say that Alan Turing saved Great Britain from destruction.

For this fact alone, Turing should be remembered and respected as a hero. However, in 1952 he was arrested, tried and convicted of gross indecency under Section 11 of the Criminal Law Amendment Act of 1885, which outlawed homosexuality in public or in private. Turing was now considered a risk to national security. There was a common public fear that homosexuals were, by their very nature, vulnerable to entrapment by Soviet spies. At the time of his arrest, Turing was somewhat of a public figure because of his work in various areas of mathematics and computing. His years of groundbreaking work suddenly fell into obscurity. He was given the choice of going to prison or undergoing chemical castration. He chose the latter. This consisted of daily pills, which would eliminate testosterone and increase estrogen. This treatment also affected his mind. He was unable to think clearly or to reason and imagine like he used to.

Unfortunately, like every other person working on confidential war projects, he was bound by the Official Secrets Act, which prohibited one from discussing the work one did during the war. Because of this, people never knew he was a hero. They never knew he turned the tide of the war. They never knew they owed their lives to Alan Turing.

On 8 June, 1953, Turing’s housekeeper found him dead. He had died the previous day of cyanide poisoning. Beside him in bed was a half-eaten apple. (His favorite fairytale was Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.) He was cremated and his ashes were spread on the grounds of the crematorium.

Turing’s life reminds us how devastating judgments can be. When we search for and find a fault in someone and then allow that fault to be that person’s defining characteristic, we limit our ability to see the person’s 9,999 great qualities.

We would each do ourselves good if everyday we asked ourselves: If, when I stand before God, he judges me the same way I judged others, will that be good or bad for me?

God sees our lives as entire books, not as individual chapters. Shouldn’t we afford others that same courtesy?

Copyright © 2015 by Energy Media Works LLC

When using portions of this article, please credit: MormonMediaNetwork.com

Posted in Acceptance, Atonement - Audio, Atonement - Videos, Kindness

Why It’s a Big Deal — When Conference Speakers Speak in Their Native Language

On Saturday morning, October 4, 2014, when Elder Chi Hong “Sam” Wong delivered his General Conference address in his native Cantonese, he did something that was a much bigger deal than many people realize.

To understand why this was such a momentous event we need to understand what goes on behind the scenes at general conference.

This year, 2014, conference sessions are being broadcast in 94 languages. To make this happen, the following steps take place:

  1. Scheduled speakers prepare and submit their talks 2-3 weeks in advance.
  2. These talks are then reviewed for accuracy. For example, a scheduled speaker may have prepared a talk dealing with the dedication of the Kirtland temple and used 1833 as the year of the dedication. The correct year is 1836.
  3. After being reviewed and needed corrections have been made, the text is then submitted to the Publishing Services Department where written translations (into the 94 broadcast languages) are made.
  4. The translated text is delivered to the various interpreters who will be providing the language interpretation for the live broadcast.
  5. The text is formatted for display on the teleprompter. The teleprompter projects a scrolling readout of the text onto large plates of glass, which are mounted in front of the three main cameras directed at the pulpit. This allows the speaker to read his or her text while looking up at the congregation or to look directly into the camera.
  6. When the speaker steps up to the pulpit and begins delivering his message, the 93 interpreters, each in a sound booth in the conference center, begin following along in the language they are interpreting. * Because these interpreters are following along with the speaker standing at the pulpit, it is important that each interpreter be fluent in English in order to stay on track and not get ahead of the speaker or fall too far behind.
  7. General Conference is broadcast with closed captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing. This captioning is provided in English and Spanish and occasionally other languages. The text needs to be formatted for those closed caption languages.

 

Although these six steps are a simplified explanation of the process, it gives us a good understanding of the basic process. Let’s now take a look at how this process is complicated when a speaker at the pulpit speaks a language other then English. For this discussion we will use Elder Wong as an example.

  1. Elder Wong prepares his remarks in his native language.
  2. He submits it for review. Before it can be reviewed, it must be translated into English because those doing the review do not read Cantonese.
  3. The reviewed and corrected text is then submitted for translation into the 93 languages, which will be broadcast.
  4. The text is formatted for the teleprompter. Keep in mind, the teleprompter is there for Elder Wong, therefore, it needs to be in Cantonese. It is also important to know that the teleprompter follows Elder Wong, Elder Wong does not follow the teleprompter. The teleprompter operator needs to scroll the text at Elder Wong’s pace. The teleprompter operator, who is expected to keep up with Elder Wong, does not speak or read Cantonese. To overcome this hurdle the teleprompter operator has a native Cantonese speaker sitting next to him following along with a pointer indicating where Elder Wong is in the text.
  5. When Elder Wong steps up to the pulpit and begins speaking, the 93 interpreters follow along in the language they are interpreting. The challenge comes in the fact that Elder Wong is speaking Cantonese and the 93 interpreters do not speak Cantonese. This hurdle is overcome in this way. A person interprets Elder Wong’s address into English and this English interpretation is delivered to the ears of the 93 other interpreters who then interpret into their given languages. This English interpretation is also broadcast on the English satellite channels.
  6. Another challenge is that Cantonese is the native language of few, if any, of those in attendance in the conference center. Therefore, an English translation needs to be projected on the screens in the hall. Again, the person providing that text most likely does not speak or read Cantonese and therefore needs to follow the English interpretation.
  7. Closed captioning also needs to be broadcast in English, Spanish and other languages. Each person providing the captioning needs to follow, not Elder Wong at the pulpit (because they don’t speak Cantonese), but the English interpretation.

 

We have not even mentioned the engineers who make sure each language is routed to the correct satellite channel so Saints in Norway don’t get Navajo, and saints in Hong Kong actually hear Elder Wong’s voice.

This has been an over-simplified explanation of the interpretation process, but with hope it has helped you appreciate the dedication of hundreds of people who make General Conference look simple.

If you’re looking for latter-day miracles, you can find them in 94 languages every six months. Broadcasting the sessions of General Conference is not a simple thing. There are many major problems that could occur; yet it is rare for the viewing or listening audience to see or hear anything that doesn’t look flawless.

When King Benjamin in the Book of Mormon wanted to speak to God’s people he asked that a tower be built. From this tower he addressed the people. Today, the tower builders are the engineers, the interpreters, the camera operators, the audio engineers, the lighting people, the ushers, the secretaries, the gardeners, and many, many others who work with dedication to assure the message reaches God’s people.

 

* It should be noted that although many of the interpreters are located in the conference center, some interpret live from locations around the world via Internet lines.

 

Copyright © 2014 by Energy Media Works LLC

When using portions of this article, please credit: MormonMediaNetwork.com

Posted in General Conference, Gifts Tagged with: , , , ,

Alzheimer’s Disease

 

“Tell me about memories. I don’t have them anymore.”

                                                                                 — My Angel Mother

May 1, 1981

I’m having my first baby any day now. I’m so excited! I’m going to be a mother! I’m so scared! I’m going to be a mother! I’m so excited! My mother is coming to help! I can’t wait!!!

Two weeks later:

Mom almost skipped into my hospital room, she was so excited to see our new baby boy. Oh, how he took her breath away, he was so beautiful! We spent a wonderful week together and Mom took care of everything!

Nineteen months later:

It’s Christmas. My second child is 10 days old. Mom and Dad flew up to see our new son and spend Christmas with us. Strangely, Mom doesn’t know it’s Christmas. She doesn’t comprehend that I have a new baby and that she is his grandmother. She’s not helping in any way. In fact, she is the one in need of help.

And there began the slow and steady decline of my angel mother.

It has been said, “When the heart weeps for what is lost, the spirit laughs for what is found.”

I don’t know what Mother’s spirit has learned through this experience,

but I am confident that the rest of us have been given opportunity to develop divine virtues.

December 15, 1989

I just washed Mother’s face and tucked her into bed. It’s an unusual role reversal . . . I remember so well when she used to tuck me into bed and I would beg her to lie down with me for “just a few minutes.” And now she begs me to stay with her. I promise I will be back in “just a few minutes,” but first I have three children who need my attention. They want to be tucked in, too. And so, for the next few weeks I am mother to four children—three that I bore, and one that bore me.

She wiped my bottom . . .now I wipe hers. She bathed and dressed me . . . now I bathe and dress her. She fixed and fed me my meals . . . now I fix and feed her her meals. She taught me to have patience . . . now I try to be patient with her. She taught me to love . . . now I return that love in ways she will never understand – at least in this life. Or will she?

She seems to understand love in a very childlike way – a pure way. She senses goodness and charity in others and responds appreciatively and affectionately. Tonight as I put her to bed she turned and hugged and kissed me and thanked me for being so kind and for all the nice things I had done for her. “I don’t know who you are or why you are doing this for me, but thank you for being so kind to me,” she said.   She couldn’t remember or identify what things I had done – but she could feel them. She doesn’t know me and she asks if I know who she is. In her mind we are total strangers; in her heart we are best friends. She depends on me for everything; she trusts everything I say; she mimics everything I do; she feels security in my presence and fear when she is alone. She looks into my face – or perhaps my eyes – and she appears confused, yet there is something familiar about me – something deeply familiar. Is it me—her daughter? Or is it my spirit – her sister?

I just cry and I don’t know if these tears are for her or for me and those of us who watch her deteriorate and wither away. We miss her so much. In that shell of a body is a spirit crying to live. In that shell is the memory of my sweet mother. I wish she could know how much she means to me.

October 1997

We buried Mom today. She is my angel – in life and in death. I love you, Mom!

Over the years, as I have struggled with life and trying to raise my four children, how often I have longed for my mother — to be encouraged by her loving words and embraced in the strength of her arms. How often I have stood alone in the shower, weeping for her plight and my own, while my pain and tears flowed silently down the drain. How often I’ve wanted to share with her the accomplishments of my children, the joys of my life, things I’ve made, music I’ve learned, callings I’ve had in the church, and so much more. Oh, how I have missed her! Yet oh how grateful I am for the legacy she left me:

Charity

suffereth long, and is kind . . .

beareth all things

believeth all things,

hopeth all things,

endureth all things.

Charity never faileth.

(1 Corinthians 13: 4-8)

 Dorothy fixed_for doc

 

Copyright © 2014 by Energy Media Works LLC

When using portions of this article, please credit: MormonMediaNetwork.com

See also: Mormon Tea Episode 7 – Fill My Cup With Memories

Lib Marsh, a woman caring for her husband with early- onset dementia, shares how she copes with the unpredictable challenges of each day. Where does she turn for peace? What “fills her cup?” Her answers will surprise and inspire you.

See also: Aging in the 21st Century

Dr. Byron Bair of the University of Utah Medical Center discusses aging in the 21st century and the effects it can have on each of us physically,emotionally, and spiritually. (Source: Insights, The Mormon Channel)

Posted in Emotional Health, Health & Wellness, Mental Health, Trials

Wholesome Living, Celebration & Gladness of Heart

Several years ago, I attended a lecture by Michael Pollan at Abravanel Hall in Salt Lake City, Utah.  He had been invited by the “Slow Food Utah” organizers and his subject was about the nature of food, our environment, and healthful eating. He displayed on a very large screen a photo of a decadently rich and luscious slice of chocolate cake.  The reaction, as he expected, was a collective groan of desire and guilt from the audience.  He went on to say that in America that is the general reaction.  However, in France, the reaction is one of Celebration!

One of my favorite books is French Women Don’t Get Fat:  The Secret of Eating For Pleasure by Mireille Guiliano.  Not only is it an absolutely delightful and inspiring read, but it seems to me that the French people seem to understand and live the Word of Wisdom!  There are a few things I personally set aside — the author builds a pretty persuasive case for enjoying a glass of wine with dinner!  But I live by my rules!

Consider a few of the French philosophies found in French Women Don’t Get Fat:

French women take pleasure in staying thin by eating well, while Americans typically see it as a conflict and obsess over it.  French women typically    think about good things to eat.  American women typically worry about bad things to eat.

French women don’t eat “fat-free”, “sugar-free,” or anything artificially stripped of natural flavor.  They go for the real thing in moderation.

French women eat with all five senses, allowing less to seem like more.

French women eat more vegetables and a lot more fruit.  French women drink water all day long.

French women eat and serve what’s in season, for maximum flavor and value, and know availability does not equal quality.

French women care enormously about the presentation of food.  It matters to them how you look at it. 

French women think dining in is as sexy as dining out.

French women love to laugh.  French women eat for pleasure.  French women don’t diet.  French women don’t get fat.

As we study, ponder and pray, a new perspective and attitude toward food and healthy living takes shape, and a new kind of gratitude flows from deep within as we receive the wonderful blessings and experiences good food offers us.

In the Doctrine & Covenants, Section 59, the Lord commands the saints to righteous living and offers these words:

Yea, blessed are they whose feet stand upon the land of Zion, who have obeyed my gospel; for they shall receive for their reward the good things of the earth, and it shall bring forth in its strength.

Verily I say, that inasmuch as ye do this, the fullness of the earth is yours . . . the herb, and the good things which come of the earth, whether for food or for raiment, or for houses, or for barns, or for orchards, or for gardens, or for vineyards;

Yea, all things which come of  the earth, in the season thereof, are made for the benefit and the use of man, both to please the eye and to gladden the heart;

Yea, for food and for raiment, for taste and for smell, to strengthen the body and to enliven the soul.

And it pleaseth God that he hath given all these things unto man; for unto this end were they made to be used, with judgment . . . D&C 59:3 16-20 (italics added)

With all that in mind, I wish to explain our personal commitment to a wholesome diet and correlate those with my Tea Party menus . . .

We drink purified water, and water is our beverage of choice most of the time.

We generally have a green smoothie or super food drink every day, made with pure water and living greens and other vegetables and/or fruits in season, preferably from our garden.  Organic whenever possible.  The “Dirty Dozen” we always buy organic!

The basis and bulk of our daily diet is healthful fruits and vegetables, mostly raw.

We grow greens in the winter with cold frames over our garden boxes.

We grow greens on our kitchen counter (herbs, sprouts and micro greens) for added nutrition in the colder months.

Raw nuts and seeds are a daily staple, usually soaked and sprouted for increased, superior nutritional content.

Legumes are a staple and usually not from a can!  Soaked and slow-cooked is best!

Grains are limited and usually sprouted and cooked over low heat for cereals.  We grind our own fresh whole-grain flours, roll our own oats, and very rarely use white flour.  If I choose to use white flour, it must be unbleached and unbromated.  (Note:  I am studying grains more intently as research indicates that hybridization over the last several decades has resulted in grains harmful to the body.)

We choose to eat meat only during the coldest winter months (however, we are also studying this one!).  In our home we eat only free-range, humanely raised and processed meats and eggs from local farms that we have visited.  (May I just add:  These animals and their farmers are happy!)  We have chosen not to eat pork or fish.  We do not drink milk, but we do make our own butter, kefir and yogurt from raw milk and cream from a local dairy farmer.

Sweeteners:  absolutely no artificial or refined sugars! When called for, we sweeten foods/drinks with natural sweeteners in their whole raw forms that contain nutrients!

  • Dates
  • Organic Coconut Palm Sugar
  • Stevia Leaf (home grown)
  • Local Raw Honey
  • Organic Pure Maple Syrup
  • Organic Sugar (Evaporated Cane Juice Crystals)
  • Organic Agave
  • Xylitol

Fats:  70% of our daily caloric intake should come from healthy fats!

  • Avocado
  • Coconut Oil
  • Extra Virgin Olive Oil (unheated)
  • Flax or Hemp Seed Oil (unheated)
  • Nuts
  • Seeds
  • NEVER vegetable oils (highly processed, usually rancid and GMO–Genetically Modified Organisms)

AVOID:  Soda pop, high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), Aspartame and other artificial sweeteners, artificial colors and flavorings, chemical and synthetic additives, GMOs, MSG, trans fats, preservatives, processed foods, and meats/milk tainted with antibiotics and growth hormones (and raised in CAFOs). We choose God-made naturally healthy foods over man-made pseudo foods, with few exceptions.

Tea Parties, particularly Traditional Afternoon Tea, are by their inherent virtue a

CELEBRATION!

A Celebration of Womanhood, Sisterhood, Friendship, Femininity, Etiquette, and our Senses to experience taste, texture, aroma, beauty and the wonderful sounds of music, joyful conversation, laughter, expressions of gratitude, and gladness!

I believe we can, with gratitude and not remorse, indulge in a beautiful, festive, and delicious celebration of tiny, tasty foods that tickle and delight our palates and our spirits.  As you will see from the recipes, I offer suggestions to change a basic recipe into a “healthier” version.  Many of the recipes are completely healthy, as are the herbal tea selections!  I try to create menus from what is in season in my area (of course, you may not be using them in the same season I created them, so bear that in mind!).  Whatever is fresh and ready and calling out to me in my garden, I definitely find a place for it in our Afternoon Tea menu!

I have found that I can eat healthy 95% of the time, and still have 1-2 days out of every month to

Celebrate!

Birthdays! 

Holidays! 

Family Gatherings! 

Ward Parties!                   

Afternoon Tea!

I’m okay with that!

So what do you say?!

Let’s Celebrate!

Copyright © 2014 by Energy Media Works LLC

When using portions of this article, please credit: MormonMediaNetwork.com

Lori Henderson – Producer/Host of “Mormon Tea” on mormonmedianetwork.com

NOTE: You can download this blog post as a PDF here.

Posted in Food, Health & Wellness Tagged with: , ,

Afternoon Tea & the Word of Wisdom

Brigham Young taught that the Lord revealed the Word of Wisdom to improve the quality of our mortal lives, to make us more effective workers in God’s earthly kingdom, and to help us to fill the full measure of our creation. (Teachings of Presidents of the Church:  Brigham Young, Introduction, Chapter 29, p. 211)

Joseph F. Smith said, “Observance of the Word of Wisdom will strengthen our bodies, ennoble our souls, and bring us nearer to God.”  (Teachings of Presidents of the Church:  Joseph F. Smith, Introduction, Chapter 36, p. 323)

“The Word of Wisdom was ‘given for a principle with promise’ (see D&C 89:3).  That word principle in the revelation is a very important one.  A principle is an enduring truth, a law, a rule you can adopt to guide you in making decisions.  Generally, principles are not spelled out in detail.   That leaves you free to find your way with an enduring truth, a principle, as your anchor.”  (Boyd K. Packer, Ensign, May 1996 p. 17)

As we read and ponder and practice our “Health Code”, we come to understand it is a profound gift with a profound purpose:  1) to protect the physical well being of the faithful and to extend their lives so that they will live longer and have more opportunity to learn and understand and contribute to what happens in the earth; and 2) to open the door to spiritual blessings and spiritual guidance. 

The Word of Wisdom, found in the Doctrine & Covenants, Section 89, states:

Verse 5:  “That inasmuch as any drinketh wine or strong drink among you, behold it is not good, neither meet in the sight of your Father, only in assembling yourselves together to offer up your sacraments before him.”

Verse 6:  “And behold, this should be wine, yea, pure wine of the grape of the vine, of your own make.”

Verse 7:  “And, again, strong drinks are not for the belly, but for the washing of your bodies.” 

Verse 8:  “And again, tobacco is not for the body, neither for the belly, and is not good for man, but is an herb for bruises and all sick cattle, to be used with judgment and skill.”

Verse 9:  “And again hot drinks are not for the body or belly.”

These are the “DON’Ts” of the Word of Wisdom.  Latter-day Prophets have explained these verses this way:

David O. McKay taught “I must tell you that our people do not believe in drinking stimulants, and we think tea is a stimulant . . . There is a substance in tea and coffee which when taken into the human system, tends to increase the beating of the heart; which in turn increases the rapidity of the circulation of the blood and of breathing.  This causes the body to become warmer and more exhilarated.  After a time, however, this temporary enlivenment passes off, and the body is really in a greater need of rest and recuperation than it was before the beverage was taken . . . The habitual use of strong drink, tobacco, tea, and coffee, only tends to make the body weaker and more dependent upon the stimulants to which it is addicted.”  (Teachings of Presidents of the Church:  David O. McKay, p 103, 105)

Brigham Young said, “The constitution that a person has should be nourished and cherished; and whenever we take anything into the system to force and stimulate it beyond its natural capacity, it shortens life.  I am physician enough to know that . . . If you will follow this counsel, you will be full of life and health, and you will increase your intelligence, your joy, and comfort.”  (Teachings of Presidents of the Church:  Brigham Young, p. 212)

Joseph F. Smith explained, “If the pure intelligence of the Spirit of God were substituted for the stimulating influence of the tea and the liquor; if we could by some means get a sufficient portion of the Spirit of the Lord within us that would cause us to know just what to do when we felt weariness and faintness coming upon us, without resorting to the aid of stimulants and drugs that go far to injure our systems and make us slaves to an acquired appetite, it would be a great deal better for us.  I would rather feel tired and exhausted by labor, and let nature have a chance to restore itself, than I would attempt to doctor myself by the use of narcotics and drugs that would sap the foundation of my physical and spiritual health . . . The young man who would cope with the world, who would be full of vigor, and fresh for the battle of life, will find his strength in living according to the word of the Lord.”  (Teachings of Presidents of the Church:  Joseph F. Smith, p. 327-328)

The late Dr. John R. Christopher, Master Herbalist and Founder of Dr. Christopher’s School of Natural Healing in Springville, Utah, has addressed the elements of the Word of Wisdom in his concise 24-page booklet  titled Just What is the Word of Wisdom?  in this way:

Strong drink – “This has generally been accepted as referring to intoxicating liquors, but a strong drink is any drink, hot or cold, which is a habit forming drink.” He goes on to explain that it was many years after this revelation was given before Man and Science understood the phrase “for the washing of your bodies”.   It was discovered that alcohol could be used for the cleansing of wounds and for the killing of germs.

Herb to be used with judgment and skill – Dr. Christopher suggests that if tobacco is such a strong and dangerous herb to require a caution for its use even on the outside of the body, “what will it do to the delicate tissues and membranes inside the body?”

Hot drinks – “The common conception of hot drinks is tea and coffee . . . Medical Science has discovered  . . . that any hot liquid taken into the body is harmful . . .”  He clarifies that hot chocolate, postum and even soup—if too hot—can be very injurious to the delicate tissues of the body.   (Just What is the Word of Wisdom? By Dr. John R. Christopher, MH, p.5-7) 

Now for some “DO’s”! 

Verse 10:  “And again, verily I say unto you, all wholesome herbs* God hath ordained for the constitution, nature, and use of man—    

Verse 11:  “Every herb in the season thereof, and every fruit in the season thereof; all these to be used with prudence and thanksgiving.”

*A footnote here defines “herbs” as “plants”, which would include plants, vines, trees, bushes, roots – all of which produce food and herbs for human nutrition.

Dr. Christopher stated that wholesome herbs “is used collectively, wherein an edible food from plants of any type, not under the fruit classification, are included.  Wholesome means healthy, whole . . . [entire, complete].”  (Ibid.)

Many other verses of scripture, both ancient and modern-day, support these verses with greater teaching:

Genesis 1:29, 31 and Moses 2:29, 31 (The Creation) – “And God said, Behold, I have given you every herb bearing seed, which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree, in the which is the fruit of a tree yielding seed; to you it shall be for meat. . . . And I God, saw everything that I had made, and, behold, all things which I had made were very good; and the evening and the morning were the sixth day.” (bold, italics added)

Alma 46:40 – “And there were some who died with fevers, which at some seasons of the year were very frequent in the land—but not so much so with fevers, because of the excellent qualities of the many plants and roots which God had prepared to remove the cause of diseases, to which men were subject by the nature of the climate.” 

D&C 42:43 (Section 42 is “The Law of the Lord to the Church”; verses 40-52 instruct that the sick are to be healed through administrations and by faith.) – “And whosoever among you are sick, and have not faith to be healed, but believe, shall be nourished with all tenderness with herbs and mild food, and that not by the hand of an enemy.”

D&C 59:17-19 – “Yea and the herb, and the good things which come of the earth, whether for food or for raiment, or for houses, or for barns, or for orchards, or for gardens or for vineyards;

“Yea, all things which come of the earth, in the season thereof, are made for the benefit and the use of man, both to please the eye and to gladden the heart; “Yea, for food and for raiment, for taste and for smell, to strengthen the body and to enliven the soul.”

Is there a difference between “tea” and “herb tea”?  YES!

True teas, from the tea plant (Camellia sinensis), are naturally caffeinated and include black, green, white, yellow, oolong, etc.  The concentration of caffeine depends on when the leaves are harvested.  For example, white tea has the least caffeine because it comes from the youngest leaves; green tea is the next harvest and is still significantly less than a black tea which has had time to grow to its fullness.  De-caffeinated teas come from the same plant; the tea has been processed to remove the caffeine. **

“Herbal tea” is a catch-all term for any naturally non-caffeinated beverage made from the infusion or decoction of herbs, spices, or other plant material in water.  “Tisane” is another word for herbal tea.  Tisanes have been used for nearly as long as written history extends, dating back to Ancient Egypt and Ancient China.  The word “tisane” originates from the Greek, meaning a drink made from pearl barley.  Tisanes/Herbal Teas are commonly used for their perceived medicinal benefits.  — Source:  Herbal tea, From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

I learned to drink herb tea on my mission in Bavaria.  As it was common practice to serve guests tea and cake, our mission president encouraged us to graciously accept the offering, but to politely request an herb tea.  It was never a problem as they always had a variety of herb teas on hand. 

I have been studying herbs and their uses and health benefits, and thoroughly enjoy creating my own blends for health and wellness, or simply a pleasurable moment by the fire with a good book, or a good friend and some good conversation! 

Some people are anxious about the word “tea” – that we should “avoid the appearance of evil.”  All I can say to that is, herb tea is not evil.   The scriptures teach us that herbs are a gift from a loving Heavenly Father.  The simplest way to get the benefits of the herbs is to cover them with hot water and allow them to steep so that the beneficial properties and the exquisite flavors are infused into the water.  It’s no different than putting herbs in water and calling it broth or soup!

Herb Tea is to Tea what Root Beer is to Beer.

They are NOT the same.

It’s that simple!

 And YOU control the temperature!  

 Lori Henderson — Producer/Host of “Mormon Tea” on mormonmedianetwork.com

NOTE: You can download this blog post as a PDF here: Afternoon Tea & The Word of Wisdom

Posted in Audio - Articles, Doctrine and Covenants Articles, Faith and Science - Articles, Food - Articles, Word of Wisdom - Articles

I Love Christmas

I love Christmas! I love everything about it . . .well, almost everything. It is my intention every year to have the time and the peace to enjoy all the things I love most. And that takes planning ahead. And even the planning ahead is joyful! I simply cannot allow myself to get caught up in the frantic pace of the season (that is not joyful to me). I decorate early, shop early, plan meals and parties and activities early, so that I can relax and soak up the joy. For me, this is a month of reflection, gratitude, family, home, beauty, music, friends, peace, serenity, and thinking on Christ and His gifts to us.

Tomorrow is December 1st. And I am ready!!!

• Decorating is complete
• Only a couple of gifts left to buy
• Advent dinners are planned and what can be purchased or made ahead is in the freezer
• Activities with grandchildren are organized and anxiously awaited
• Christmas books and articles are strategically placed in cozy places
• Our collection of Christmas music is already filling the air
• The dining table is covered in Christmas linen with our Advent Kranz (wreath) as the centerpiece. Four candles clipped to its pine branches await the Sabbath evenings when they will each be lit to celebrate the coming birth of our Savior.
• And my living room tea table is set with an heirloom Christmas teapot with cups and saucers, and elegant serving platters for anyone who wants to share in a cup of Christmas Cheer (the herbal tea kind!)

The Italians have a saying: “La vita vera!” It means “the true life” which is
Good food, Good conversation and Everyone around the dinner table together!

I think “la vita vera” extends beyond the dinner table to the tea table! When my visiting teachers or our home teachers come, or relatives or friends drop by unexpectedly, some lovely aromatic herbal teas and Christmas cookies or scones await them! Good food! Good conversation! All around the tea table together!

“Tea beckons us to enjoy quality time with friends and loved ones,
and especially to rediscover the art of relaxed conversation.” — Dorothea Johnson, Tea & Etiquette

A solitary tea is also a welcome delight. A good book, a soft sofa and a warm blanket, a twinkling Christmas tree, a glowing fire, and a cup of warm cinnamony cider. Even alone, I am in good company.

Language . . . has created the word “loneliness”
to express the pain of being alone.
And it has created the word “solitude”
to express the glory of being alone.

Share a cup of kindness this Christmas Season!

Lori Henderson — Producer/Host of Mormon Tea

SEE ALSO: This blog post in PDF form (pdf viewer will open)

Posted in Attitude, Emotional Health, Family - Articles, Health & Wellness

Martin Luther

… Priest, Professor, Fugitive, Reformer

EARLY LIFE

Martin Luther was born in the Fall of 1483 in Saxony, which later became part of the German Empire. His father Hans was a miner and life was difficult economically for the Luthers. By the time Martin was 8 his father had been able to lease several mines in the town of Mansfeld. It was here that Martin was enrolled in boarding schools. When he was 14 he was enrolled in the St. George boarding school in Eisenach. His parents hoped this school would be a springboard for young Martin to become a lawyer.

WHEN LIGHTNING STRIKES

In July of his 22nd year Martin was returning to his studies at the university in Erfurt after a visit home. He was caught in a thunderstorm. A blinding lightning bolt knocked him to the ground. Looking toward heaven, he pleaded for his life to be spared. He promised that if he were spared he would join a religious order and serve God as a Monk.

Shortly after making this vow, he joined the Augustinian monastery in Erfurt. He took his new life seriously and quickly became known as a biblical scholar. He took a teaching post at the university in Wittenberg and in 1512 the university made him a Doctor of Theology.

PROPOSING A DIALOGUE

On October 31, 1517, Luther tacked ninety-five theses  to the door of the church in Wittenberg. It was a common practice to post such documents as the first step to opening a dialogue. One of the main questions or concerns Luther had was the selling of indulgences. Papal indulgences were a way for the Catholic Church to raise money to build St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome. By purchasing an indulgence, one could receive forgiveness for sin. One could also purchase forgiveness for family members who had already passed away. Luther felt that this practice made people feel that being good was not important if you could afford an indulgence.

THE BEGINNING OF THE REFORMATION AND THE GROUNDWORK FOR THE RESTORATION

Copies of Luther’s theses spread quickly. Many people, especially colleagues at the university, supported his proposals for reforming the church.

Three and a half years after posting his 95 theses, Luther was excommunicated from the church. During those 3 and a half years he wrote books, pamphlets and other scholarly works which criticized the church and made arguments for, and recommendations for reformation.

THE DIET OF WORMS

Shortly after his excommunication, Luther was summoned to the city of Worms to attend diet (assembly). Princes and other representatives of cities in Germany attended this assembly. Luther was given the opportunity to deny that he had spoken out against the church. He refused. Standing before the diet, he said,  “… I cannot and will not retract anything, since to act against one’s conscience is neither safe nor right. God help me, Amen!”

Because of his defiance in Worms, Luther was branded a fugitive who could lawfully be killed on sight. His friend, Prince Frederick of Saxony, secreted Luther to the castle in Wartburg where he, disguised as a knight, spent several months.

Luther eventually married Katherine von Bora, a former nun. As a wedding gift, Prince Frederick gave the couple a house at the university in Wittenberg. They had six children here. Two of their children died before reaching adulthood.

Luther passed away at the age of 62 in the city of his birth, Eisleben, Germany. He remained faithful to his convictions throughout his life. He said, “I would rather lose my life and head than desert the crystal-clear word of God.”

INSPIRED OF GOD

Martin Luther was a person called of God to help lay the groundwork for the restoration of the gospel of Jesus Christ.

President Joseph F. Smith said, “Calvin, Luther, Melanchthon, and all reformers, were inspired in thoughts, words, and actions to accomplish what they did for the liberty, and advancement of the human race. They paved the way for the more perfect gospel of truth to come.”

SEE ALSO: MARTIN LUTHER FACT SHEET (pdf viewer will open)

Posted in Uncategorized
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