Quotes on Faith

Ether 3:11, 4:16; Genesis 1:6, 9  

Many in the world hold back from making the ‘leap of faith’ because they have already jumped to some other conclusions — often the conclusions of Korihor, which are: God never was nor ever will be; there is not a redeeming Christ; man cannot know the future; man cannot know of that which he cannot see; whatsoever a man does is no crime; and death is the end. (See Alma 30:13-18.) The number of modern-day adherents to the Korihor conclusions will grow. — Elder Neal A. Maxwell, “The Inexhaustible Gospel,” Ensign, April 1993, p. 71

Do not let our faith be shaken by critics who never seem to recognize that knowledge of things divine comes by the power of the Spirit and not of the wisdom of men. — Church News, October 9, 1993

You cannot have adequate faith in a Christ you do not adequately know. — Elder Neal A. Maxwell

Faith and Doubt cannot exist in the same soul at the same time. — Joseph Smith

Work on the projects ahead, and when you have taken one step in the acquiring of faith, it will give you the assurance in your soul that you can go forward and take the next step, and by degrees your power or influence will increase until eventually, in this world or the next, you will say to the Mt. Zerin’s [see Ether 12:30] in your life, “Be thou removed.”  You will say to whatever encumbers your course of eternal progress, “Depart,” and it will be so. — Elder Bruce R. McConkie, “Lord, Increase Our Faith,” BYU Speeches of the Year, October 1967, p. 11

The main test of life on earth is to see if a person – not remembering the premortal existence with Heavenly Father and not being able to prove His existence by material evidence – will still have faith in God, trust Him, and obey His commandments, no matter the hazard or sacrifice that may be required. — Elder Robert E. Wells, Sidney B. Sperry Symposium at BYU, 1991

Elder Dallin H. Oaks explained that faith, no matter how strong it is, cannot produce a result contrary to the will of Him whose power it is.  “The exercise of faith in the Lord Jesus Christ is always subject to the order of heaven, to the goodness and will and wisdom and timing of the Lord.  That is why we cannot have true faith in the Lord without also having complete trust in the Lord’s will and in the Lord’s timing.

“When we have that kind of faith and trust in the Lord, we have true security in our lives.

“My beloved young sisters, each of you needs to build a reservoir of faith so you can draw upon it when someone you love or respect betrays you, when some scientific discovery seems to cast doubt on a gospel principle, or when someone makes light of sacred things, such as the name of God or the sacred ceremonies of the temple.  You need to draw on your reservoir of faith when you are weak or when someone else calls on you to strengthen them.  You also need to draw on your reservoir of faith when some requirement of Church membership or service interferes with your personal preferences.

“Faith in the Lord Jesus Christ prepares you for whatever life brings.  This kind of faith prepares you to deal with life’s opportunities – to take advantage of those that are received and to persist through the disappointments of those that are lost.

“Most importantly, faith in the Lord Jesus Christ opens the door of salvation and exaltation, ‘for no [one] can be saved, according to the words of Christ, save they shall have faith in his name.’ (Moroni 7:38).” — Elder Dallin H. Oaks, General Young Women Broadcast, March 26, 1994

Faith is the power by which God speaks and worlds, solar systems, and universes come into being.  So when we speak of faith we speak of tremendous power, even the power that can save a man from temporal and spiritual death. — Gerald N. Lund, “An Exploration of the Process of Faith as Taught in the Book of Mormon,” Church Education System Manual, p. 17

“Dispute not because ye see not, for ye receive no witness until after the trial of your faith.”  (Ether 12:6.)

Joseph Smith said, “We are looked upon by God as though we were in eternity.  God dwells in eternity, and does not view things as we do.”  — Teachings of the Prophet Joseph Smith, p. 356.

We are to exercise faith.  We are placed on earth as a probation.  It is not now – nor was it ever – the intention of a wise, omniscient Heavenly Father to solve all our problems.  Life is not an uninterrupted holiday.  God expects us to struggle so we may become godlike.  The edict from Eden was that man should eat bread by the sweat of his brow!  (See Gen. 3:19.)

“Whatsoever ye ask the Father in my name it shall be given unto you, that is expedient for you.”  (D&C 88:64)  And again, “Whatsoever ye shall ask the Father in my name, which is right, believing that ye shall receive, behold it shall be given unto you.”  (3 Nephi 18:20) — Elder Marvin J. Ashton, “Know He Is There,” BYU Devotional, 10 November 1992; Ensign, February 1994, p. 54

I fear that in this world of skeptics and pragmatists we are losing the spirit of those wonderful scriptural phrases:  “I will go and do;”  “I know not save the Lord commandeth me;” or “for a wise purpose in him, which purpose I know not.”  That’s the spirit of dedication, of commitment, of faith that we must show to the Lord as we go about our Father’s business in a significant way.  This is how we say in our own lives, “Because I have been given much, I too must give.” — Stanley A. Peterson, BYU Book of Mormon Symposium, Church News, August 20, 1994 p. 5

Therefore to be obedient to the precepts of our divine Master, we say unto you – Search the Scriptures – search the revelations which we publish, and ask your Heavenly Father, in the name of His Son Jesus Christ, to manifest the truth unto you, and if you do it with an eye single to His glory, nothing doubting, He will answer you by the power of His Holy Spirit.  You will then know for yourselves and not for another.  You will not then be dependent on man for the knowledge of God; nor will there be any room for speculation.  No; for when men receive their instruction from Him that made them, they know how he will save them.  (History of the Church, 1:282-83) — Ensign, June 1994, p. 10

Each of you needs to build a reservoir of faith so you can draw upon it when someone you love or respect betrays you, when some scientific discovery seems to cast doubt on a gospel principle, or when someone makes light of sacred things, such as the name of God or the sacred ceremonies of the temple.  You need to draw on your reservoir of faith when you are weak or when someone else calls on you to strengthen them.  You also need to draw on your reservoir of faith when some requirement of Church membership or service interferes with your personal preferences.

You need the strength that comes from faith and trust in the Lord Jesus Christ if you are to fulfill your duty to “stand as witnesses of God at all times and in all things, and in all places” (Mosiah 18:9).  In times of trial you need the comfort offered in the holy scriptures, which assure you that when you have the shield of faith you will “be able to quench all the fiery darts of the wicked” (D&C 27:17).

Faith in the Lord Jesus Christ prepares you for whatever life brings.  This kind of faith prepares you to deal with life’s opportunities – to take advantage of those that are received and to persist through the disappointments of those that are lost.

Most importantly, faith in the Lord Jesus Christ opens the door of salvation and exaltation: “For no [one] can be saved, according to the words of Christ, save they shall have faith in his name” (Moro. 7:38). — Elder Dallin H. Oaks, “Faith in the Lord Jesus Christ,” General Conference, April 1994; Ensign, May 1994, p. 100

In this work there must be commitment.  There must be devotion.  We are engaged in a great eternal struggle that concerns the very souls of the sons and daughters of God.  We are not losing.  We are winning.  We will continue to win if we will be faithful and true.  We can do it.  We must do it.  We will do it.  There is nothing the Lord has asked of us that in faith we cannot accomplish.

I think of the children of Israel when they fled Egypt.  They camped beside the Red Sea.  Looking back, they saw Pharoah and his armies coming to destroy them.  Fear gripped their hearts.  With the armies behind them and the sea before them they cried out in terror.

“And Moses said unto the people, Fear ye not, stand still, and see the salvation of the Lord, which he will shew to you to day: for the Egyptians whom ye have seen to day, ye shall see them again no more for ever.

“The Lord shall fight for you, and ye shall hold your peace.

“And the Lord said unto Moses, . . speak unto the children of Israel, that they go forward.”  (Ex. 14:13-15; italics added.)

The sea parted and the children of Israel moved to their salvation.  The Egyptians followed to their own destruction.

Shall we not also in faith move forward? — President Gordon B. Hinckley, October 1986 General Conference

“Trust in the Lord with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own understanding” (Proverbs 3:5). . . .

We live in complex times.  We deal with serious problems, all of us.  There is not any question in my mind that in this congregation today there are those who are deeply concerned about various matters, wonder about them, what to do about them, and how can they handle this and handle that. . . . “Trust in the Lord.” — President Gordon B. Hinckley, Ogden Regional Conference, Sept. 19, 2004; “Trust the Lord,” Church News, September 25, 2004

What is faith?  Faith is absolute confidence in that which is in absolute conformity to the will of heaven.  When we combine that confidence with absolute action on our part, we have faith. — Elder Joseph B. Wirthlin, “Improving our Prayers,” Ensign, March 2004, p. 27

Your trust in the Lord must be more powerful and enduring than your confidence in your own personal feelings and experience.

To exercise faith is to trust that the Lord knows what He is doing with you and that He can accomplish it for your eternal good even though you cannot understand how He can possibly do it.  We are like infants in our understanding of eternal maters and their impact on us here in mortality.  Yet at times we act as if we knew it all.  When you pass through trials for His purposes, as you trust Him, exercise faith in Him, He will help you.  That support will generally come step by step, a portion at a time.  While you are passing through each phase, the pain and difficulty that comes from being enlarged will continue.  If all matters were immediately resolved at your first petition, you could not grow.” — Elder Richard G. Scott, “Trust in the Lord,” Ensign, November 1995, p. 17

Faithful Hyrum had a believing heart; he did not have to see everything Joseph saw.  For him, hearing the truth from Joseph’s lips and feeling the spiritual promptings whispering that it was true were enough.  Faith to believe was the source of Hyrum’s spiritual strength and is the source of the spiritual strength of faithful members of the Church then and today.

We do not need more members who question every detail; we need members who have felt with their hearts, who live close to the Spirit, and who follow its promptings joyfully.  We need seeking hearts and minds that welcome gospel truths without argument or complaint and without requiring miraculous manifestation.  Oh, how we are blessed when members respond joyfully to counsel from their bishops, stake presidents, quorum or auxiliary leaders, some of whom might be younger than they and less experienced.  What great blessings we receive when we follow “that which is right” joyfully and not grudgingly. — Elder M. Russell Ballard, “Hyrum Smith: Firm As the Pillars of Heaven,” Ensign, November 1995, p. 8

When a man works by faith he works by mental exertion instead of physical force.  It is by words, instead of exerting his physical powers, with which every being works when he works by faith.  God said, “Let there be light: and there was light.” . . . And the Savior says: “If you have faith as a grain of mustard seed, say tot his mountain, ‘Remove,’ and it will remove; or say to that sycamine tree, ‘Be ye plucked up, and planted in the midst of the sea,’ and it shall obey you.”  Faith, then works by words; and with these its mightiest works have been, and will be, performed.  (Joseph Smith, Lectures on Faith, 72-73) The Pearl of Great Price Student Manual, p. 7

Faith precedes the miracle.  It has ever been so and shall ever be.  It was not raining when Noah was commanded to build an ark.  There was no visible ram in the thicket when Abraham prepared to sacrifice his son Isaac.   Two heavenly personages were not yet seen when Joseph knelt and prayed.  First came the test of faith – and then the miracle.

Remember that faith and doubt cannot exist in the same mind at the same time, for one will dispel the other.  Cast out doubt.  Cultivate faith. — President Thomas S. Monson, “The Call to Serve,” Ensign, Nov. 2000, pp. 48-49

Three things are necessary in order that any rational and intelligent being may exercise faith in God unto life and salvation.  First, the idea that he actually exists.  Secondly, a correct idea of his character, perfections, and attributes.  Thirdly, an actual knowledge that the course of life which he is pursuing is according to His will. — Joseph Smith, Lectures on Faith 3:2-5

Our main task is to declare the gospel and do it effectively.  We are not obligated to answer every objection.  Every man eventually is backed up to the wall of faith, and there he must make his stand.  (President Ezra Taft Benson) — Robert Millet, “What We Believe,” BYU Devotional, Feb. 3, 1998, p. 9

Still, we mortals quite naturally want to know the why.  Yet, in pressing too earnestly for the answer, we may forget that mortality was designed, in a manner of speaking, as the season of unanswered questions.  Mortality has a different, more narrowly defined purpose:   It is a proving ground, a pr9obationary state, a time to walk by faith, a time to prepare to meet God.

. . . It is in enduring well to the end that we achieve this life’s purposes.  I believe that mortality’s supreme test is to face the “why” and then let it go, trusting humbly in the Lord’s promise that “all things must come to pass in their time” (D&C 64:32).

But the Lord has not left us comfortless or without any answers.  As to the healing of the sick, He has clearly said:   “And again, it shall come to pass that he that hath faith in me to be healed, and is not appointed unto death, shall be healed” (D&C 42:48).  All too often we overlook the qualifying phrase “and is not appointed unto death” (“or,” we might add, “unto sickness or handicap”).

. . . The Lord – who inspires the blessings and who hears every earnest prayer – called him home nonetheless.  All the experiences of prayer, fasting, and faith may well have been more for our benefit than for his.

. . . The three Hebrew magistrates [Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego] expressed trust that the Lord would deliver them from the fiery furnace, “but if not,” they said to the king, “we [still] will not serve thy gods” (Daniel 3:18). — Elder Lance B. Wickman, “But If Not,” Ensign, November 2002, pp. 30-31

“My boy, you must learn to walk to the edge of the light, and perhaps a few steps into the darkness, and you will find that the light will appear and move ahead of you.” — Counsel given by Elder Harold B. Lee to Boyd K. Packer, The Holy Temple, pp. 184-86

For the natural man, sacrifice does not come naturally.  He has an insatiable appetite for more. . . .

Faith isn’t tested so much when the cupboard is full as when it is bare.  In these defining moments, the crisis doesn’t create one’s character – it reveals it.  The crisis is the test. — Elder Lynn G. Robbins, General Conference, Ensign, May 2005

So far as I am concerned, I say, let everything come as God has ordained it.  I do not desire trials; I do not desire affliction . . . but if . . . the powers of darkness are let loose, and the spirit of evil is permitted to rage, and an evil influence is brought to bear on the Saints, and my life, with theirs, is put to the test; let it come, for we are the Saints of the Most High God, and all is well, all is peace, all is right, and will be, both in time and in eternity.    (John Taylor, Journal of Discourses, Vol. 5, 115-116) — Elder N. Aldin Porter, “Sacrifice Brings What?” BYU-Idaho Devotional, February 10, 2004

The situation is very pleasant and you would be much pleased to see it.  How long we will be permitted to enjoy it I know not; but the Lord knows what is best for us.  I feel but little concerned about where I am, if I can but keep my mind staid upon God; for you know, in this, there is perfect peace.  (Preston Nibley, The Presidents of the Church, 13th ed., rev. and enl. [Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Co., 1974], 180-181) — Elder N. Aldin Porter, “Sacrifice Brings What?” BYU-Idaho Devotional, February 10, 2004

In many instances of a similar nature where the destruction of the people of God seemed imminent, and there appeared no way of escape, suddenly there arose something or another that had been prepared for their salvation to avert the impending destruction. We find this in the case of the Israelites when led by Moses.  When they came to the Red Sea and the Egyptian army in their rear threatened their destruction, there seemed no way of escape, but at the very moment when deliverance was required, behold, it appeared and they were delivered. So it has been and so it ever will be with us. Notwithstanding our difficulties may appear very great, yet there will be means provided for our escape if we ourselves perform the duties incumbent upon us as the children of God.  But it may become necessary in the future – and this is the point I wish to make – for some of the Saints to act the part of Esther, the queen, and be willing to sacrifice anything and everything that is required at their hands for the purpose of working out the deliverance of the Latter-day Saints. . . .

But it is our business to step forward as did Esther, and be willing to risk all for the salvation of the people.  In undertaking her task, Esther said, “If I perish, I perish.”  Here is a lesson for our sisters.  But the people of God will not perish.  There will always be a ram caught in the thicket for their deliverance. — President Lorenzo Snow, Journal of Discourses 23:290, p. 293

No, it is not without a recognition of life’s tempests but fully and directly because of them that I testify of God’s love and the Savior’s power to calm the storm. Always remember in that biblical story that He was out there on the water also, that He faced the worst of it right along with the newest and youngest and most fearful.  Only one who has fought against those ominous waves is justified in telling us – as well as the sea – to “be still.”  (D&C 101:16)  Only one who has taken the full brunt of such adversity could ever be justified in telling us in such times to “be of good cheer.”  (John 16:33; D&C 68:6)  Such counsel is not a jaunty pep talk about the power of positive thinking, though positive thinking is much needed in the world.  No, Christ knows better than all others that the trials of life can be very deep and we are not shallow people if we struggle with them.  But even as the Lord avoids sugary rhetoric, He rebukes faithlessness and He deplores pessimism. He expects us to believe!  — Elder Jeffrey R. Holland, “An High Priest of Good Things to Come,” Ensign, November 1999, p. 36

Each of you needs to build a reservoir of faith so you can draw upon it when someone you love or respect betrays you, when some scientific discovery seems to cast doubt on a gospel principle, or when someone makes light of sacred things, such as the name of God or the sacred ceremonies of the temple.  You need to draw on your reservoir of faith when you are weak or when someone else calls on you to strengthen them.  You also need to draw on your reservoir of faith when some requirement of Church membership or service interferes with your personal preferences . . . . Faith in the Lord Jesus Christ prepares you for whatever life brings.  This kind of faith prepares you to deal with life’s opportunities – to take advantage of those that are received and to persist through the disappointments of those that are lost. — Elder Dallin H. Oaks, “Faith in the Lord Jesus Christ,” Ensign, May 1994, p. 98

In the early days of the Church in Mexico, two faithful leaders who were disciples of Christ became martyrs because of their belief.  The two whose lives were taken were Rafael Monroy and Vicente Morales.

During the Mexican Revolution, Rafael Monroy was the president of the small San Marcos Mexico Branch, and Vicente Morales was his first counselor.  On July 17, 1915, they were apprehended by the Zapatistas.  They were told they would be spared if they would give up their weapons and renounce their strange religion.  Brother Monroy told his captors that he did not have any weapons and simply drew from his pocket his Bible and Book of Mormon.  He said, “Gentlemen, these are the only arms I ever carry; they are the arms of truth against error.”

When no arms were found, the brethren were cruelly tortured to make them divulge where arms were hidden.  But there were no arms.  They were then taken under guard to the outskirts of the little town, where their captors stood them up by a large ash tree in front of a firing squad.  The officer in charge offered them freedom if they would forsake their religion and join the Zapatistas, but Brother Monroy replied, “My religion is dearer to me than my life, and I cannot forsake it.”

They were then told that they were to be shot and asked if they had any request to make.  Brother Rafael requested that he be permitted to pray before he was executed. There, in the presence of his executioners, he kneeled down and, in a voice that all could hear, prayed that God would bless and protect his loved ones and care for the little struggling branch that would be left without a leader.  As he finished his prayer, he used the words of the Savior when He hung upon the cross and prayed for his executioners: “Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do.”  With that the firing squad shot both Brother Monroy and Brother Morales.

Some years ago I went to Mexico to reorganize a stake presidency.  As I conducted the interviews, I was privileged to become acquainted with one of the descendants of Rafael Monroy. I was very impressed with the depth of this man’s testimony and his commitment to the gospel.  When I asked him what had happened to the rest of Brother Monroy’s descendants, he said that many of them have been on missions and continue faithful in the Church. — President James E. Faust, Ensign, November 2006, pp. 21-22

It is a relatively simple thing to pour out gratitude to God when the cup is full, the harvest plenteous, the peace secure; but it is much more challenging to have the faith to believe that even in adversity and persecution, even in times of darkness and devastation, the Lord’s hand is in it for the benefit of his children. — LDS Church News, June 10, 1989

This faith and hope of which I speak, is not a Pollyanna-like approach to significant personal and public problems.  I don’t believe we can wake up in the morning and simply by drawing a big “happy face” on the chalkboard believe that is going to take care of the world’s difficulties.  But if our faith and hope is anchored in Christ, in his teachings, commandments, and promises, then we are able to count on something truly remarkable, genuinely miraculous, which can part the Red Sea and lead Modern Israel to a place, “where none shall come to hurt or make afraid.”  Fear, which can come upon people in difficult days, is a principal weapon in the arsenal which Satan uses to make mankind unhappy.  He who fears loses strength for the combat of life, in the fight against evil. Therefore the power of the Evil One always tries to generate fear in human hearts.  In every age and in every era fear has faced mankind. — President Howard W. Hunter, “An Anchor to the Souls of Men,” CES Fireside for Young Adults, February 7, 1993

We need not live in fear of the future.  We have every reason to rejoice and little reason to fear.  If we follow the promptings of the Spirit, we will be safe, whatever the future holds.  We will be shown what to do. — President Boyd K. Packer, Ensign, May 2000, p. 8

Faith is not only a feeling; it is a decision.  With prayer, study, obedience, and covenants, we build and fortify our faith.  Our conviction of the Savior and His latter-day work becomes the powerful lens through which we judge all else.  Then, as we find ourselves in the crucible of life, as Elder Oaks explained, we have the strength to take the right course.

President Hinckley said it this way:  “When [an individual] is motivated by great and powerful convictions of truth, then he disciplines himself, not because of demands made by the Church but because of the knowledge within his heart.”

Are we sufficiently motivated by “great and powerful convictions of truth”?  Do our choices reflect this motivation?  Are we becoming who we want to become?  It’s true, isn’t it?  Then what else matters? — Elder Neil L. Anderson, “It’s True, Isn’t it?  Then what else matters?” Ensign, May 2007

Lucy Mack Smith, mother of the Prophet, was asked to take charge of the exodus of the members from Fayette [May 1831].  When they arrived at Buffalo, New York, they found that the harbor on Lake Erie was clogged with an ice field, and the steamboat carrying the Fayette Saints was unable to leave port.  In this difficult situation, she called upon the members to exercise their faith: “Now, brethren and sisters, if you will all of you raise your desires to heaven, that the ice may be broken up, and we be set at liberty, as sure as the Lord lives, it will be done.”  At that very moment a noise was heard “like bursting thunder.”  The ice parted and a narrow passage formed through which the boat was able to move.  They had barely passed through when the avenue again closed, but they were in open water and could continue their journey.  Following this miraculous escape, the company was called together in a prayer meeting to offer up their thanks to God for his mercy on their behalf.  (Lucy Mack Smith, History of the Church, 240) Our Heritage, a Brief History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, p. 19

If we do not have a deep foundation of faith and a solid testimony of truth, we may have difficulty withstanding the harsh storms and icy winds of adversity which inevitably come to each of us.

Mortality is a period of testing, a time to prove ourselves worthy to return to the presence of our Heavenly Father.  In order for us to be tested, we must face challenges and difficulties. These can break us, and the surface of our souls may crack and crumble – that is, if our foundations of faith, our testimonies of truth are not deeply embedded within us. — President Thomas S. Monson, “On Being Spiritually Prepared,” Ensign, February 2010, p. 5

Any reluctance to sacrifice whatever God requires will, to that degree, lessen our ability to have faith in God.

“But those who have not made this sacrifice to God do not know that the course which they pursue is well pleasing in his sight; for whatever may be their belief or their opinion, it is a matter of doubt and uncertainty in their mind; and where doubt and uncertainty are there faith is not, nor can it be.  For doubt and faith do not exist in the same person at the same time; so that persons whose minds are under doubts and fears cannot have unshaken confidence; and where unshaken confidence is not there faith is weak; and where faith is weak the persons will not be able to contend against all the opposition, tribulations, and afflictions which they will have to encounter in order to be heirs of God, and joint heirs with Christ Jesus; and they will grow weary in their minds, and the adversary will have power over them and destroy them.”  (Joseph Smith, Lectures on Faith, 6:15) Old Testament Student Manual, p. 80

Be believing, be happy, don’t get discouraged.  Things will work out. — President Gordon B. Hinckley

Get on your knees and pray, then get on your feet and work. — President Gordon B. Hinckley

The time has come for us to stand a little taller, to lift our eyes and stretch our minds to a greater comprehension and understanding of the grand millennial mission of this, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. — President Gordon B. Hinckley

Our lives are the only meaningful expression of what we believe and in Whom we believe.  And the only real wealth, for any of us, lies in our faith. — President Gordon B. Hinckley

This cause will roll on in majesty and power to fill the earth.  Doors now closed to the preaching of the gospel will be opened.  The Almighty, if necessary, may have to shake the nations to humble them and cause them to listen to the servants of the living God. Whatever is needed will come to pass. — President Gordon B. Hinckley

Faith in something greater than ourselves enables us to do what we have said we’ll do, to press forward when we are tired or hurt or afraid, to keep going when the challenge seems overwhelming and the course is entirely uncertain. — President Gordon B. Hinckley

As member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, we need to place unreserved confidence in the Lord Jesus Christ, whom we accept as the Son of God.  Until the world accepts Him as the Savior of mankind, lives His teachings, and looks to Him as the Way, the Truth, and the Life in all phases of our lives, we shall continue in our anxiety about the future and our ability to cope with the challenges that mortality brings to each of us. . . .

Why is it expedient that we center our confidence, our hope, and our trust in one solitary figure?  Why is faith in Him so necessary to peace of mind in this life and hope in the world to come?  The answers to these questions determine whether we face the future with courage, hope, and optimism or with apprehension, anxiety, and pessimism. — President Ezra Taft Benson, Ensign, June 1990

By faith in God you can be attuned to the Infinite and by power and wisdom obtained from your Heavenly Father harness the powers of the universe to serve you in your hour of need in the solution of problems too great for your human strength or intelligence.   (President Harold B. Lee, Church News, 15 Aug. 1970, p. 2) Old Testament Student Manual, 1 Kings – Malachi, p. 298

The book of Job vividly illustrates a teaching from the Lectures on Faith, that if anyone is to endure in faithfulness in his life, he must know three things:  that God exists, that he is perfect in his character and in his attributes, and that the course of life which one pursues is pleasing to the Lord.  If any one of these elements is missing then the full basis for faith is missing.   (Keith H. Meservy, associate professor of ancient scripture at BYU, in an address entitled “Job: ‘Yet Will I Trust in Him,” at the Sixth Annual Sidney B. Sperry Symposium in January 1978.) Old Testament Student Manual, 1 Kings – Malachi, p. 23

Elisha, with a power known only to the prophets, had counseled the king of Israel on how and where and when to defend against the warring Syrians.  The king of Syria, of course, wished to rid his armies of this prophetic problem. So – and I quote:

“Therefore sent he thither horses, and chariots, and a great host: and they came by night, and compassed the city about. . . . an host compassed the city both with horses and chariots.”  [2 Kings 6:14–15]

If Elisha is looking for a good time to be depressed, this is it.  His only ally is the president of the local teachers quorum.  It is one prophet and one lad against the world. And the boy is petrified.  He sees the enemy everywhere – difficulty and despair and problems and burdens everywhere.  The bus is gone and all he can see is Chicago.  With faltering faith the boy cries, “Alas, my master!  How shall we do?”

And Elisha’s reply? 

“Fear not: for they that be with us are more than they that be with them” (2 Kings 6:15–16).

“They that be with us?”  Now just an Israelite minute here.  Faith is fine and courage is wonderful, but this is ridiculous, the boy thinks.  There are no others with them.  He can recognize a Syrian army when he sees one, and he knows that one child and an old man are not strong odds against it.  But then comes Elisha’s promise:

Fear not: for they that be with us are more than they that be with them.  And Elisha prayed, and said, Lord, I pray thee, open his eyes, that he may see.  And the Lord opened the eyes of the young man; and he saw: and, behold, the mountain was full of horses and chariots of fire round about Elisha.  [2 Kings 6:16–17]

In the gospel of Jesus Christ you have help from both sides of the veil, and you must never forget that.  When disappointment and discouragement strike – and they will – you remember and never forget that if our eyes could be opened we would see horses and chariots of fire as far as the eye can see riding at reckless speed to come to our protection. They will always be there, these armies of heaven, in defense of Abraham’s seed.

I close with this promise from heaven.

“Verily, verily, I say unto you, ye are little children, and ye have not as yet understood how great blessings the Father hath in his own hands and prepared for you; And ye cannot bear all things now; nevertheless, be of good cheer, for I will lead you along.”  [D&C 78:17–18]

“I will go before your face.  I will be on your right hand and on your left, . . . and mine angels [shall be] round about you, to bear you up.”  [D&C 84:88]

“The kingdom is yours and the blessings thereof are yours, and the riches of eternity are yours.”  [D&C 78:18]

Oh yes, “We’ll find the place which God for us prepared.”  And on the way “We’ll make the air with music ring, Shout praises to our God and King; Above the rest these words we’ll tell – All is well! All is well!” (“Come, Come, Ye Saints,” Hymns, 1985, no. 30). — Elder Jeffrey R. Holland, “For Times of Trouble,” BYU Devotional, March 18, 1980

One cannot have adequate faith in a Christ whom he does not adequately know, “who is a stranger . . . far from the thoughts and intents of his heart.”  (Mosiah 5:13)  Instead, by laying aside “every weight” of the world and the sins which so “easily beset us,” by looking unto Jesus and by feasting upon His words, we will be able to move forward with intellectual and spiritual vigor.  Otherwise, as Paul said, we can become wearied and faint in our minds. (See Heb. 12:1–3; see also 2 Ne. 31:20.)  When we understand what was revealed to Adam – “[my] plan of salvation unto all men” (Moses 6:62) – then these doctrines are keenly relevant for tomorrow’s trial, Tuesday’s temptation, or next month’s surge of self-pity.  After all, chastening, the trial of our faith, and patience are part of the plan. (See Mosiah 23:21.) . . .

If sought by faith (see Rom. 9:30–32), these doctrines of the radiant restoration enclose us in divine purpose during our sojourn in this “far country.”  Like the prodigal son who “came to himself,” we thus receive needed perspective and direction as we also begin to “arise and go to [our] Father.” (See Luke 15:11–32.) . .

We will not be strangers in the City of God.  We were there before, when the morning stars sang together and the sons of God shouted for joy at the prospects of this stern but necessary mortal existence.  (See Job 38:4–7.) . . .

The trek will be proving and trying.  Faith, patience, and obedience are essential (see Mosiah 23:21; Abr. 3:25), but he who completes the journey successfully will be immeasurably added upon.  (See Abr. 3:26.)  And he who does not will have subtracted from the sum of his possibilities. . . .

Doers, said Jesus, will know that these doctrines are of God. (See John 7:17.) Therefore, do not be surprised when nondoers scoff.  Do not be surprised, either, if these doctrines unsettle some.  Such was the case when the ancient Apostles filled Jerusalem with their doctrines.  (See Acts 5:28.)  And when Jesus focused His hearers on doctrines, “they were astonished at his doctrine.”  (Matt. 22:33)  The only cure for the doctrinal illiteracy of those who murmur will be to learn doctrine.  (See Isa. 29:24) — Elder Neal A. Maxwell, “Called and Prepared from the Foundation of the World,” General Conference, April 1986

What are some of the empowering principles upon which faith is based?

  • Trust in God and in His willingness to provide help when needed, no matter how challenging the circumstance.
  • Obedience to His commandments and a life that demonstrates that He can trust you.
  • Sensitivity to the quiet promptings of the Holy Spirit.
  • Courageous implementation of that prompting.
  • Patience and understanding when God lets you struggle to grow and when answers come a piece at a time over an extended period.

— Elder Richard G. Scott, “The Transforming Power of Faith and Character,” Ensign, November 2010, pp. 43-46

“Faith is things which are hoped for and not seen; wherefore, dispute not because ye see not, for ye receive no witness until after the trial of your faith” (Ether 12:6).  Thus, every time you try your faith – that is, act in worthiness on an impression – you will receive the confirming evidence of the Spirit.  As you walk to the boundary of your understanding into the twilight of uncertainty, exercising faith, you will be led to find solutions you would not obtain otherwise.  With even your strongest faith, God will not always reward you immediately according to your desires.  Rather, God will respond with what in His eternal plan is best for you, when it will yield the greatest advantage.  Be thankful that sometimes God lets you struggle for a long time before that answer comes.  That causes your faith to increase and your character to grow. — Elder Richard G. Scott, “The Transforming Power of Faith and Character,” Ensign, Nov. 2010, pp. 43-46

And so I issue a call for the conviction we all must have burning in our hearts that this is the work of God and that it requires the best we can give to the effort.  My appeal is that you nurture your own physical and spiritual strength so that you have a deep reservoir of faith to call upon when tasks or challenges or demands of one kind or another come.  Pray a little more, study a little more, shut out the noise and shut down the clamor, enjoy nature, call down personal revelation, search your soul, and search the heavens for the testimony that led our pioneer parents.  Then, when you need to reach down inside a little deeper and a little farther to face life and do your work, you will be sure there is something down there to call upon. . . .

There is work to be done.  We cannot say that every one of our neighbors has deep faith, that every one has a strong family, that every one near and far has heard the gospel message and has become a believing, teaching, temple-going Latter-day Saint.  The world is getting more wicked, and the times ahead will try the best of us.  But the forces of righteousness will always prevail when people like Stanford and Arabella Smith, people like Samuel Claridge and his spunky daughter Elizabeth make it prevail. — Elder Jeffrey R. Holland, “Faith to Answer the Call,” Ensign, July 2011, p. 54      

And today many say, “How silly!  How could accepting Christ save me?  They will not turn their heads to look nor incline their ears to hear.  They ignore the great witness that comes from these conferences.  We ought to, indeed we must, heed the counsel of these men, for the Lord said, “What I the Lord have spoken, I have spoken, and I excuse not myself; and though the heavens and the earth pass away my word shall not pass away, but shall all be fulfilled, whether by mine own voice or by the voice of my servants, it is the same.” — Elder Boyd K. Packer, Conference Report, Oct. 1968

Each of us comes to know his cross quite well.  We know its configurations; we know its weight.  We feel its rough edges.  It would be so much easier for us to carry it if we could develop the faith which would permit us to cast our cares upon our Father in heaven, because he cares for us, as Peter reminds us.  It would be so much easier to carry if we could do as Paul suggests and rid ourselves of the weights that we need not carry. We may think these are a part of carrying the cross when, in fact, they are a function of our own stupidity or our own sin.  We can rid ourselves of these so that we may take up the cross and move swiftly and deliberately on to our journey. — Elder Neal A. Maxwell, “Taking Up the Cross,” Fireside BYU, 4 Jan 1976

Never let your faith be difficult to detect. — President J. Reuben Clark, quoted by Elder Jeffrey R. Holland, Worldwide Leadership Training Meeting, Feb. 18, 2007

You never totally move beyond faith as hope; it is not a box we check off and say, “I am done.”  Rather, we begin again and gain experience with a new principle.  It spirals upward as a helix, building and continuing.  Here is how that occurs.  We move from level of faith to level of faith through desire, a willingness to experiment and act, and then receiving a spiritual confirmation as evidence of things not seen. This process and experience bolster our faith. Consequently, we exhibit an increased willingness to experiment and receive an even greater confirmation.  Our confidence waxes stronger, line upon line, precept upon precept, here a little and there a little. — Elder David A. Bednar, Presentation at BYU-Idaho

True faith is focused in and on the Lord Jesus Christ and always leads to righteous action.  The Prophet Joseph Smith taught that “faith [is] the first principle in revealed religion, and the foundation of all righteousness” and that it is also “the principle of action in all intelligent beings”  (Lectures on Faith [1985], 1).  Action alone is not faith in the Savior, but acting in accordance with correct principles is a central component of faith. Thus, “faith without works is dead” (James 2:20). — Elder David A. Bednar, “Ask in Faith,” Ensign, May 2008

I will take the liberty of saying to every man and woman who wishes to obtain salvation through him (the Savior) that looking to him, only, is not enough: they must have faith in his name, character and atonement; and they must have faith in his father and in the plan of salvation devised and wrought out by the Father and the Son.  What will this faith lead to?  It will lead to obedience to the requirements of the Gospel; and the few words that I may deliver to my brethren and sisters and friends this afternoon will be with the direct view of leading them to God. — Brigham Young, Journal of Discourses, Vol.13, p. 56, from talk given July 18, 1869

When we have faith in the Lord Jesus Christ, we must have trust in him.  We must trust him enough that we are content to accept his will, knowing that he knows what is best for us. . . . When we try to develop faith in the Lord Jesus Christ rather than merely cultivating faith as an abstract principle of power, we understand the meaning of the Savior’s words: “If ye will have faith in me, ye shall have power to do whatsoever thing is expedient in me (Moro. 7:33).” — Elder Dallin H. Oaks, “Faith in the Lord Jesus Christ,” Ensign, May 1994, pp. 99-100

One “biography of faith” Howard W. Hunter mentioned was that of Nephi.  “With his parents, he left prosperous circumstances in Jerusalem and then for eight years, in great affliction, journeyed in the wilderness.  The family then cross uncharted seas to a new land.  During this period, Nephi was assailed, ridiculed, and persecuted by members of his household.  Following the death of his father, Nephi and other family members had to separate themselves from his older brothers because they sought his life.  Out of his despair, he declared, ‘My God hath been my support; he hath led me through mine afflictions in the wilderness; and he hath preserved me upon the waters of the great deep.’  (2 Ne. 4:20)

Today other biographies of faith are being written – Saints who, like Job, suffer physical pain, emotional sorrow, and even disloyalty from friends – yet remain faithful; Saints who, like Jacob, see sons and daughters not so valiant as they should be, but who bless them for their potential;  Saints who, like Paul, endure great ridicule and endure to the end; Saints who, like Nephi, must separate themselves from family because of their commitment to the gospel.  There are those who know pain and sorrow because of loss of loved ones; who know spiritual sorrow because children go astray; who experience loss of health, financial reverses, and emotional distress, and yet, like Job, resolve, “When he hath tried me, I shall come forth as gold” (Job 23:10).           

We recently celebrated the birthday of President Spencer W. Kimball.  Most of us are familiar with the fact that great adversity has been his companion for a great portion of his eighty-five years.  He spoke from experience when he wrote these words: “Being human, we would expel from our lives physical pain and mental anguish and assure ourselves of continual ease and comfort, but if we were to close the doors upon sorrow and distress, we might be excluding our greatest friends and benefactors.  Suffering can make saints of people as they learn patience, long-suffering, and self-mastery” (Faith Precedes the Miracle, Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Company, 1972, p. 98). — President Howard W. Hunter, “God Will Have a Tried People,” Ensign, May 1980, p. 24

What a marvelous and wonderful thing it is, this powerful conviction that says the Church is true.  It is God’s holy work.  He overrules in the things of His kingdom and in the lives of His sons and daughters.  This is the reason for the growth of the Church.  The strength of this cause and kingdom is not found in its temporal assets, impressive as they may be.  It is found in the hearts of its people.  That is why it is successful.  That is why it is strong and growing.  That is why it is able to accomplish the wonderful things that it does. It all comes of the gift of faith, bestowed by the Almighty upon His children who doubt not and fear not, but go forward. — President Gordon B. Hinckley, General Conference, April 2001

President Harold B. Lee once said, “If you want the blessing, don’t just kneel down and pray about it.  Prepare yourselves in every conceivable way you can in order to make yourselves worthy to receive the blessing you seek.”

Sometimes we tend to believe that if we have enough faith, anything can happen without our really putting forth much effort, without doing all that is possible, or without “running as hard as we can and praying on the run.”  The Lord expects us to do all in our power as we exercise our faith.

How is this kind of faith developed?  In Alma we read: “Now, as I said concerning faith – that it was not a perfect knowledge – even so it is with my words.  Ye cannot know of their surety at first, unto perfection, any more than faith is a perfect knowledge.”  Faith, then, is not a perfect knowledge.  Alma goes on to say, “But behold, if ye will awake and arouse your faculties, even to an experiment upon my words, . . .” (Alma 32:26–27). — Elder Robert B. Harbertson, “The Eye of Faith,” New Era, September 1988, p. 4

To produce fruit, your trust in the Lord must be more powerful and enduring than your confidence in your own personal feelings and experiences. — Elder Richard G. Scott, “Trust in the Lord,” Ensign, November 1995

The Savior taught the Nephites that they must always pray to the Father in his name, adding: “And whatsoever ye shall ask the Father in my name, which is right, believing that ye shall receive, behold it shall be given unto you” (3 Ne. 18:20).

Here the Savior reminds us that faith, no matter how strong it is, cannot produce a result contrary to the will of him whose power it is.  The exercise of faith in the Lord Jesus Christ is always subject to the order of heaven, to the goodness and will and wisdom and timing of the Lord.  That is why we cannot have true faith in the Lord without also having complete trust in the Lord’s will and in the Lord’s timing.  When we have that kind of faith and trust in the Lord, we have true security in our lives.  President Spencer W. Kimball said, “Security is not born of inexhaustible wealth but of unquenchable faith” (The Teachings of Spencer W. Kimball, 1982, pp. 72–73). — Elder Dallin H. Oaks, “Faith in the Lord Jesus Christ,” Ensign, May 1994, p. 98

Faith and knowledge require equal effort and commitment.  We cannot expect to have faith at the center of our lives if all of our efforts are expended on knowledge, sports, hobbies, making money, or other pursuits. — Elder Quentin L. Cook, “Strengthen Faith as You Seek Knowledge,” Ensign, September 2008

As I think about faith, this principle of power, I am obliged to believe that it is an intelligent force.  Of what kind, I do not know.  But it is superior to and overrules all other forces of which we know. . . . [We] have had this great power given unto us, this power of faith.  What are we doing about it?  Can you, can we, do the mighty things that our Savior did?  Yes.  They have been done by the members of the Church who had the faith and the righteousness so to do.  Think of what is within your power if you but live the Gospel, if you but live so that you may invoke the power which is within you.  — President J. Reuben Clark, Conference Report, April 1960, p. 21

To all within the sound of my voice who may have doubts, I repeat the words given Thomas as he felt the wounded hands of the Lord:  “Be not faithless, but believing.” Believe in Jesus Christ, the Son of God, the greatest figure of time and eternity.  Believe that his matchless life reached back before the world was formed.  Believe that he was the Creator of the earth on which we live.  Believe that he was Jehovah of the Old Testament, that he was the Messiah of the New Testament, that he died and was resurrected, that he visited these western continents and taught the people here, that he ushered in this final gospel dispensation, and that he lives, the living Son of the living God, our Savior and our Redeemer. — President Gordon B. Hinckley, Conference Report October 1978

Meanwhile, ultimate hope makes it possible to say the same three words used centuries ago by three valiant men.  They knew God could rescue them from the fiery furnace, if He chose.  “But if not,” they said, nevertheless, they would still serve Him!  (Dan. 3:18)

Unsurprisingly the triad of faith, hope, and charity, which brings us to Christ, has strong and converging linkage: faith is in the Lord Jesus Christ, hope is in His atonement, and charity is the “pure love of Christ”! (See Ether 12:28; Moro. 7:47.)  Each of these attributes qualifies us for the celestial kingdom (see Moro. 10:20–21; Ether 12:34).  Each, first of all, requires us to be meek and lowly (see Moro. 7:39, 43).

Faith and hope are constantly interactive, and may not always be precisely distinguished or sequenced.  Though not perfect knowledge either, hope’s enlivened expectations are “with surety” true (Ether 12:4; see also Rom. 8:24; Heb. 11:1; Alma 32:21).  In the geometry of restored theology, hope has a greater circumference than faith. If faith increases, the perimeter of hope stretches correspondingly.

Just as doubt, despair, and desensitization go together, so do faith, hope, and charity.  The latter, however, must be carefully and constantly nurtured, whereas despair, like dandelions, needs so little encouragement to sprout and spread.  Despair comes so naturally to the natural man! — Elder Neal A. Maxwell, Conference Report, October 1994

Just as the capacity to defer gratification is a sign of real maturity, likewise the willingness to wait for deferred explanation is a sign of real faith and of trust spread over time. — Elder Neal A. Maxwell, “Willing to Submit,” Ensign, May 1985, p. 71

I too believe that God will always make a way where there is no way.  I believe that if we will walk in obedience to the commandments of God, if we will follow the counsel of the priesthood, he will open a way even where there appears to be no way. — President Gordon B. Hinckley

Once we start to recognize the many miraculous and blessed manifestations of God and Christ in our lives – the everyday variety as well as restored sight to the blind and restored hearing to the deaf – we may be truly bewildered at the unexplainable principles and processes that bring about such wonders. — President Howard W. Hunter, “The God That Doest Wonders,” Ensign, May 1989, p. 15

Perhaps it is time that we humble ourselves and overcome the obstacles to faith, and then become converted as Peter did.  Why go through life with two candlepower when more than four hundred watts are available?  The tasks are so great!  How can we possibly take the gospel to all the world and redeem the dead at the same time?  I don’t know, but the power and energy to do so must and will come by faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. — Elder John K. Carmack, Ensign, May 1993, p. 41

You need not know everything before the power of the atonement will work for you. Have faith in Christ, it begins to work the day you ask. — Elder Boyd K. Packer, Ensign, May 1997, p. 10

The constant exercise of our faith by lofty thinking, prayer, devotion, and acts of righteousness is just as essential to spiritual health as physical exercise is to the health of the body.  Like all priceless things, faith, if lost, is hard to regain.  Eternal vigilance is the price of our faith.  In order to retain our faith we must keep ourselves in tune with our Heavenly Father by living in accordance with the principles and ordinances of the gospel. — Elder O. Leslie Stone, Ensign, July 1973, p. 59

Some say that they have not faith, that they cannot believe.  What is faith?  It is confidence.  What is confidence?  It is faith.  Some people are striving and striving to get faith, when saving faith is simply confidence in God, flowing from walking in obedience to His commandments.  When you have confidence in yourself, in any man, woman, or child, you have faith; and when you have not confidence, you have not faith.  I believe they are co-partners, and the principle of faith and confidence is synonymous to me. — Elder Heber C. Kimball, Journal of Discourses, 4:249

Faith is like spiritual oxygen.  As we allow faith to freely flow within us, it awakens and enlivens our spiritual senses.  It breathes life into our very souls. 

As faith flows, we become sensitively attuned to the whisperings of the Spirit.  Our minds are enlightened, our spiritual pulse quickens, our hearts are touched. 

Faith fuels hope.  Our perspective changes; our vision becomes clearer.  We begin to look for the best, not the worst, in life and in others.  We gain a deeper sense of life’s purpose and meaning.  Despair gives way to joy. — Elder David S. Baxter, “Faith, Service, Constancy,” Ensign, November 2006, p. 13

Therefore, perhaps the challenge is to have the kind of faith during the hard times that we exercised when we first chose.  The kind of faith that turns questioning and even anger into acknowledging the power, blessings, and hope that can come only from Him who is the source of all power, blessings, and hope.  The kind of faith that brings the knowledge and assurances that all that we experience is part of the gospel plan and that for the righteous, all that appears wrong will eventually be made right.  The peace and understanding to endure with dignity and clarity of purpose can be the sweet reward.  This kind of faith can help us to see the good, even when life’s path seems to be layered only with thorns, thistles, and craggy rocks. — Elder Richard C. Edgley, “For Thy Good,” Ensign, May 2002, p. 6

We don’t always know the details of our future.  We do not know what lies ahead. We live in a time of uncertainty.  We are surrounded by challenges on all sides. Occasionally discouragement may sneak into our day; frustration may invite itself into our thinking; doubt might enter about the value of our work.  In these dark moments Satan whispers in our ears that we will never be able to succeed, that the price isn’t worth the effort, and that our small part will never make a difference.  He, the father of all lies, will try to prevent us from seeing the end from the beginning. — President Dieter F. Uchtdorf, “See the End from the Beginning,” Ensign, May 2006, p. 43

All of our decisions will not be perfect.  We will feel hopefully only temporarily, regret.  But let us never wait for perfect clarity.  It will be a rare decision indeed when all of the data in perfect clarity is apparent before the decision is made.  Some of our greatest growth comes from the mind stretching exercise of filling in where information is not available and weighing that which is incomplete.  Sometimes there must simply be a leap of faith. — Elder Hugh W. Pinnock, “Decisions Determine Our Destiny,” February 6, 1981

As we consider our mortal existence on this earth and the purpose of life expressed by Alma that ”this life is the time for men to prepare to meet God” (Alma 34:32), what is the Lord’s way to help us achieve this very purpose?  It is simply, by using this metaphor, to help us build a bridge of faith in our life for crossing and overcoming the walls of unbelief, indifference, fear, or sin. Our mortal life is the time for men to meet God by building a bridge of faith, opening the door into immortality and eternal life. — Elder Charles Didier, Ensign, November 2001

He [Heavenly Father] is our perfect Father.  He loves us beyond our capacity to understand.  He knows what is best for us.  He sees the end from the beginning.  He wants us to act to gain needed experience:  When He answers yes, it is to give us confidence. When He answers no, it is to prevent error.  When He withholds an answer, it is to have us grow through faith in Him, obedience to His commandments, and a willingness to act on truth. — Elder Richard G. Scott, “Learning to Recognize Answers to Prayer,” Ensign, November 1989, p. 30

A pebble held close to the eye appears to be a gigantic obstacle.  Cast on the ground, it is seen in perspective.  Likewise, problems or trials in our lives need to be viewed in the perspective of scriptural doctrine.  Otherwise they can easily overtake our vision, absorb our energy, and deprive us of the joy and beauty the Lord intends us to receive here on earth. — Elder Richard G. Scott, “Finding Joy in Life,” Ensign, May 1996

It is my hope and my belief that the Lord never permits the light of faith wholly to be extinguished in any human heart, however faint the light may glow.  The Lord has provided that there shall still be there a spark which, with teaching, with the spirit of righteousness, with love, with tenderness, with example, with living the Gospel, shall brighten and glow again, however darkened the mind may have been.  And if we shall fail so to reach those among us of our own whose faith has dwindled low, we shall fail in one of the main things which the Lord expects at our hands. — President J. Reuben Clark, Conference Report, October 1936, p. 114

When the challenges of mortality come, and they come for all of us, it may seem hard to have faith and hard to believe.  At these times only faith in the Lord Jesus Christ and His Atonement can bring us peace, hope, and understanding.  Only faith that He suffered for our sakes will give us the strength to endure to the end.  When we gain this faith, we experience a mighty change of heart, and like Enos, we become stronger and begin to feel a desire for the welfare of our brothers and sisters.  We pray for them, that they too will be lifted and strengthened through faith on the Atonement of our Savior Jesus Christ. — Elder Robert D Hales, “Finding Faith in the Lord Jesus Christ,” Ensign, Nov. 2004, p. 7

I too believe that God will always make a way where there is no way.  I believe that if we will walk in obedience to the commandments of God, if we will follow the counsel of the priesthood, he will open a way even where there appears to be no way. — President Gordon B. Hinckley

Faith in the Lord is trust in the Lord.  We cannot have true faith in the Lord without also having complete trust in the Lord’s will and in the Lord’s timing.  As a result, no matter how strong our faith is, it cannot produce a result contrary to the will of Him in whom we have faith.  Remember that when your prayers do not seem to be answered in the way or at the time you desire.  The exercise of faith in the Lord Jesus Christ is always subject to the order of heaven, to the goodness and will and wisdom and timing of the Lord.  When we have that kind of faith and trust in the Lord, we have true security and serenity in our lives. — Elder Dallin H. Oaks, “The Atonement and Faith,” Ensign, April 2010, p. 30

When spiritually aligned, a poise can come, even when we do not know “the meaning of all things.”  (1 Ne. 11:17)  Such contented assurance  produces not arrogance but quiet acceptance, which is its own form of being “anxiously engaged”  but without all the bells and whistles (D&C 58:27; see also D&C 58:28).

However, this spiritual contentment rests on our accepting the  Atonement of Jesus, because we “have come to a knowledge of the  goodness of God, and his matchless power, and his wisdom, and his  patience, and his long-suffering towards the children of men; and  also, the atonement which has been prepared from the foundation of the world” (Mosiah 4:6).

Again, brothers and sisters, seeing Alma move from wanting to be a “trump” to being a humble “instrument” and from wanting to “shake the earth”  to “perhaps [bringing] some soul to repentance” is a stunning transition!  (See Alma 29:1.)

Furthermore, isn’t it wonderful that we are permitted to grow, whether  that growth is expressed in the space of nine verses or in a lifetime? — Elder Neal A. Maxwell, “Content with the Things Allotted unto Us,” Ensign, May 2000, p. 72

However much faith to obey God we now have, we will need to strengthen it continually and keep it refreshed constantly.  We can do that by deciding now to be more quick to obey and more determined to endure.  Learning to start early and to be steady are the keys to spiritual preparation.  Procrastination and inconsistency are its mortal enemies. — President Henry B. Eyring, “Spiritual Preparedness: Start Early and Be Steady,” Ensign, November 2005, p. 38

Some are willing to set aside the precious gospel truths restored by Joseph Smith because they get diverted on some historical issue or some scientific hypothesis not central to their exaltation, and in so doing they trade their spiritual birthright for a mess of pottage.  They exchange the absolute certainty of the Restoration for a doubt, and in that process they fall into the trap of losing faith in the many things they do know because of a few things they do not know. — Elder Tad R. Callister, “Joseph Smith: Prophet of the Restoration,” Ensign, November 2009, p. 37

We’re not going to survive in this world, temporally or spiritually, without increased faith in the Lord – and I don’t mean a positive mental attitude – I mean downright solid faith in the Lord Jesus Christ.  That is the one thing that gives vitality and power to otherwise rather weak individuals. — Elder A. Theodore Tuttle, “Developing Faith,” Ensign, November 1986, p. 72

The constant exercise of our faith by lofty thinking, prayer, devotion, and acts of righteousness is just as essential to spiritual health as physical exercise is to the health of the body.  Like all priceless things, faith, if lost, is hard to regain.  Eternal vigilance is the price of our faith.  In order to retain our faith we must keep ourselves in tune with our Heavenly Father by living in accordance with the principles and ordinances of the gospel. — Elder O. Leslie Stone, “The Constant Exercise of Our Faith,” July 1973, Ensign, p. 59

One’s life . . . cannot be both faith-filled and stress-free. . . . Therefore, how can you and I really expect to glide naively through life, as if to say, ”Lord, give me experience, but not grief, not sorrow, not pain, not opposition, not betrayal, and certainly not to be forsaken. Keep from me, Lord, all those experiences which made Thee what Thou art!  Then let me come and dwell with Thee and fully share Thy joy!” . . .

Real faith . . . is required to endure this necessary but painful developmental process. — Elder Neal A. Maxwell, “Lest Ye Be Wearied and Faint in Your Minds,” Ensign, May 1991, pp. 88, 90

It is through faith that the Lord performs his wonders among his people; and in enduring that trial of their faith he gives a blessing; and often the Lord shapes trials in a manner different from our expectations.  We, in our limited capacity may mark out in our minds a programme; and when he moves upon the checker-board, he does not move the men we have in our minds, but he shapes and moves in another way; and we should be satisfied with the result.  He will get the game, and in the end will move into the king row and be able to move both ways. — Elder Erastus Snow, Journal of Discourses, 26 vols., 5:301

You can’t merely snap your fingers and get great faith in God, any more than you can snap your fingers and get great musical ability.  Faith takes hold of us only when we take hold of it. The great psychologist, William James, said, “That which holds our attention determines our action,” and one of the unfortunate things in life is that we sometimes focus our attention on the wrong things. — Elder Sterling W. Sill, Conference Report, April 1955, p. 117 

We must not lose hope.  Hope is an anchor to the souls of men.  Satan would have us cast away that anchor.  In this way he can bring discouragement and surrender.  But we must not lose hope.  The Lord is pleased with every effort, even the tiny, daily ones in which we strive to be more like Him.  Though we may see that we have far to go on the road to perfection, we must not give up hope. — President Ezra Taft Benson, “A Mighty Change of Heart,” Ensign, October 1989, p. 2

Hope is one leg of a three-legged stool, together with faith and charity.  These three stabilize our lives regardless of the rough or uneven surfaces we might encounter at the time. . . . Hope in our Heavenly Father’s merciful plan of happiness leads to peace, mercy, rejoicing, and gladness.  The hope of salvation is like a protective helmet; it is the foundation of our faith and an anchor to our souls. — President Dieter F. Uchtdorf, “The Infinite Power of Hope,” Ensign, November 2008, pp. 21-24

No matter how difficult the trail, and regardless of how heavy our load, we can take comfort in knowing that others before us have borne life’s most grievous trials and tragedies by looking to heaven for peace, comfort, and hopeful assurance.  We can know as they knew that God is our Father, that He cares about us individually and collectively, and that as long as we continue to exercise our faith and trust in Him there is nothing to fear in the journey. — Elder M. Russell Ballard, “You Have Nothing to Fear from the Journey,” Ensign, May 1997, p. 59

We’re not going to survive in this world, temporally or spiritually, without increased faith in the Lord – and I don’t mean a positive mental attitude – I mean downright solid faith in the Lord Jesus Christ.  That is the one thing that gives vitality and power to otherwise rather weak individuals. — Elder A. Theodore Tuttle, “Developing Faith,” Ensign, Nov. 1986, p. 72

Increased faith is as vital and necessary today as it was when Jesus walked the earth.  Our modern world struggles with insufficient faith.  President Gordon B. Hinckley said in a conference talk:  “This is my prayer for all of us. . . . Increase our faith to bridge the chasms of uncertainty and doubt. . . . Grant us faith to look beyond the problems of the moment to the miracles of the future. . . . Give us faith to do what is right and let the consequences follow. — Elder James O. Mason, “Faith in Jesus Christ,” April 2001, Ensign, p. 22

However much faith to obey God we now have, we will need to strengthen it continually and keep it refreshed constantly.  We can do that by deciding now to be more quick to obey and more determined to endure.  Learning to start early and to be steady are the keys to spiritual preparation.  Procrastination and inconsistency are its mortal enemies. — President Henry B. Eyring, “Spiritual Preparedness: Start Early and Be Steady,” Ensign, November 2005, p. 38

Thus, faith in Christ leads to righteous action, which increases our spiritual capacity and power.  Understanding that faith is a principle of action and of power inspires us to exercise our moral agency in compliance with gospel truth, invites the redeeming and strengthening powers of the Savior’s Atonement into our lives, and enlarges the power within us whereby we are agents unto ourselves (see D&C 58:28). — Elder David A. Bednar, “Ask in Faith,” Ensign, May 2008, p. 95

Our Heavenly Father is aware of our needs and will help us as we call upon Him for assistance.  I believe that no concern of ours is too small or insignificant.  The Lord is in the details of our lives. — President Thomas S. Monson, “Consider the Blessings,” Ensign, November 2012

If we speak of faith in the abstract, it is the power of God by which the worlds are and were made, and is a gift of God to those who believe and obey his commandments. — Brigham Young, Journal of Discourses, 8:259

I have faith in my God, and that faith corresponds with the works I produce.  I have no confidence in faith without works. — Brigham Young, Journal of Discourses, 4:24

It is the easiest thing in the world to believe the truth.  It is a great deal easier to believe truth than error.  It is easier to defend truth than to defend error. — Brigham Young, Journal of Discourses, 19:42

When you believe the principles of the Gospel and attain unto faith, which is a gift of God, he adds more faith, adding faith to faith.  He bestows faith upon his creatures as a gift. — Brigham Young, Journal of Discourses, 8:17

If the people will only be full of good works, I will insure that they will have faith in time of need. — Brigham Young, Journal of Discourses, 3:154

When faith springs up in the heart, good works follow, and good works will increase that pure faith within them. — Brigham Young, Journal of Discourses, 3:155

If the Latter-day Saints will walk up to their privileges, and exercise faith in the name of Jesus Christ, and live in the enjoyment of the fulness of the Holy Ghost constantly day by day, there is nothing on the face of the earth that they could ask for, that would not be given them.  The Lord is waiting to be very gracious unto this people. Discourses of Brigham Young, 156

Fear not; ask questions.  Be curious, but doubt not!  Always hold fast to faith and to the light you have already received.  Because we see imperfectly in mortality, not everything is going to make sense right now. . . . It’s true that “faith is not . . . a perfect knowledge” (Alma 32:21), but as you exercise your faith, applying gospel principles every day under any circumstances, you will taste the sweet fruits of the gospel, and by this fruit you will know of its truth (see Matthew 7:16–20; John 7:17; Alma 32:41–43). — President Dieter F. Uchtdorf, 2nd Counselor in the First Presidency, “The Reflection in the Water,” Church Educational System fireside for young adults, November 1, 2009

The greatest need in the world today is faith in God and courage to do his will. Teachings of Presidents of the Church: David O. McKay, p. 171

When we get to the other side of the veil, we shall know something.  We now work by faith.  We have the evidence of things not seen.  The resurrection, the eternal judgment, the celestial kingdom, and the great blessings that God has given in the holy anointings and endowment in the temples, are all for the future, and they will be fulfilled, for they are eternal truths.  We will never while in the flesh, with this veil over us, fully comprehend that which lies before us in the world to come.  It will pay any man to serve God and to keep His commandments the few days he lives upon the earth. Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Wilford Woodruff, p. 154

With the decline of religion in our society, many people have come to feel that they are sufficient unto themselves and have no need of a higher power.  Wrong.  A loss of religious faith implies a loss of faith in anyone greater than oneself. . . .

It can at times be easy to fall into the erroneous thinking that we ourselves are capable of handling anything that comes our way, that we have all the answers, and that there is no need for assistance from a higher power.  When we realize, as one person put it, that “we are not human beings having a spiritual experience; we are spiritual beings having a human experience,” we come to understand where our main emphasis should be and on whom we are reliant. — President Thomas S. Monson, “Be a Light to the World,” BYU Devotional, November 1, 2011

Great and marvelous events seem to motivate us, but small things often do not hold our attention.  Noting that the Liahona worked by faith, Alma stated, “Nevertheless, because those miracles were worked by small means . . . [the people of Lehi] were slothful, and forgot to exercise their faith and diligence and then those marvelous works ceased, and they did not progress in their journey.” (Alma 37:41) 

Is our journey sometimes impeded when we forget the importance of small things? (See Alma 37:46.) — Elder M. Russell Ballard, “Small and Simple Things,” Ensign, April 1990

Prophecy and religion supply the one most indispensable element in all our colossal endeavor, and that is faith – faith in the destiny of our democracy, faith in the triumph of righteousness over evil, and faith in the worth, the integrity, and the majesty of man. — Elder Stephen L Richards, Conference Report, April 1942, p. 68

To have faith in Jesus Christ means to have such trust in him that we obey whatever he commands.  There is no faith where there is no obedience.  Faith comes from hearing the word of God and is a spiritual gift.  Faith increases when we not only hear, but act on the word of God as well, in obedience to the truths we have been taught. — Elder L Whitney Clayton, “Help Thou Mine Unbelief,” Ensign, Nov 2001, p. 28

Because of the conflicts and challenges we face in today’s world, I wish to suggest a single choice – a choice of peace and protection and a choice that is appropriate for all. That choice is faith.  Be aware that faith is not a free gift given without thought, desire, or effort. It does not come as the dew falls from heaven.  The Savior said, “Come unto me” (Matthew 11:28) and “Knock, and it shall be [given] you” (Matthew 7:7).  These are action verbs – come, knock.  They are choices.  So I say, choose faith.  Choose faith over doubt, choose faith over fear, choose faith over the unknown and the unseen, and choose faith over pessimism.  Alma’s classic discussion on faith, as recorded in the 32nd chapter of Alma in the Book of Mormon, is a series of choices to ensure the development and the preservation of our faith.  Alma gave us a directive to choose.  His were words of action initiated by choosing.  He used the words awake, arouse, experiment, exercise, desire, work, and plant.  Then Alma explained that if we make these choices and do not cast the seed out by unbelief, then “it will begin to swell within [our] breasts” (Alma 32:28).  Yes, faith is a choice, and it must be sought after and developed.  Thus, we are responsible for our own faith.  We are also responsible for our lack of faith.  The choice is yours. — Elder Richard C. Edgley, October 2010 General Conference

Let me suggest another matter on this whole subject of early, powerful, doctrinal declarations of Christ.  I am intrigued that more than four-fifths of the Book of Mormon – 86 percent by actual page count – comes out of a period before Christ’s personal appearance to the Nephites in his resurrected state. 

I am deeply moved by that simple little statistic.  I am profoundly touched by it.  What faith!  And what a way to teach us faith.  You and I are expected to have faith in a Christ who has already come and lived and walked and talked and been crucified and resurrected.  And we have witnesses, believers and non-believers, who saw him and heard him, who touched the hem of his garment on one day and felt the wounds in his hands and feet and side on another. 

But these early Book of Mormon people?  This keystone record of ours?  It deals in remarkable faith of a very special kind, greater, it seems to me, than you and I are asked to exert.  They had (at least 458 pages worth of them had) not a Christ who had come in the flesh but only the trust and consummate hope that such a Christ would come – far in the future and after most of them were dead.  What godly, believing, stalwart people.  I am moved to the center of my soul.  And I feel ashamed for our post-advent generations who have so many witnesses and so much evidence but still do not wish to believe. — Elder Jeffrey R. Holland, BYU Symposium on the Book of Mormon, 9 August 1994

In this world upheaval, in this day of wanton destruction, we, as a people must look upward.  There must be trust and faith in our hearts.  Hope must walk by our side.  We must remember charity also.  We must treasure the warm words of the Father to His Church, “Be of good cheer, and do not fear, for I the Lord am with you, and will stand by you” ( D&C 68:6).  We who have been called to leadership in the Church of Christ must lead our people from anxiety and fear and doubt, to trust and faith in the Lord, and certainty in the outcome of the Lord’s plan of salvation.  We must repeat with gladness the words of the Lord, “Fear not, let your hearts be comforted; yea, rejoice evermore, and in everything give thanks” ( D&C 98:1). 

Above the roar of cannon and airplane, the maneuvers and plans of men, the Lord always determines the tide of battle.  So far and no farther does He permit the evil one to go in his career to create human misery.  The Lord is ever victorious; He is the Master to whose will Satan is subject. Though all hell may rage, and men may follow evil, the purposes of the Lord will not fail.  The God of Israel, “He slumbers not nor sleeps” ( Ps. 121:4).  It is well to remember the admonition of old:  “Be still and know that I am God”  (Ps. 46:10). — Elder John A. Widtsoe, Conference Report, April 1942, pp. 32-34

God is weaving his tapestry according to his own grand design.  All flesh is in his hands.  It is not our prerogative to counsel him.  It is our responsibility and our opportunity to be at peace in our minds and in our hearts, and to know that he is God, that this is his work, and that he will not permit it to fail. 

We have no need to fear.  We have no need to worry.  We have no need to speculate.  Our imperative need is to be found doing our duty individually in the callings which have come to us. — President Gordon B. Hinckley, “He Slumbers Not, nor Sleeps,” Ensign, May 1983

The first principle of the gospel is faith in the Lord Jesus Christ.  Faith means trust – trust in God’s will, trust in His way of doing things, and trust in His timetable.  We should not try to impose our timetable on His. . . . Indeed, we cannot have true faith in the Lord without also having complete trust in His will and in His timing. . . . 

The Lord’s timing also applies to the important events of our personal lives.  A great scripture in the Doctrine and Covenants declares that a particular spiritual experience will come to us “in his own time, and in his own way, and according to his own will” (D&C 88:68). This principle applies to revelation (see Oaks, “Teaching and Learning by the Spirit,” Ensign, March 1997, 11) and to all of the most important events in our lives: birth, marriage, death, and even our moves from place to place. . . . 

It is not enough that we are under call, or even that we are going in the right direction.  The timing must be right, and if the time is not right, our actions should be adjusted to the Lord’s timetable as revealed by His servants. . . . — Elder Dallin H. Oaks, “Timing,” Ensign, October 2003

FAITH Quotes – Sometimes We Don’t Know Why:

“The fulfillment of God’s promises to Abraham required that Israel should become numerous. To accomplish this, the little family, numbering only 70 persons (Genesis 46:26–27), needed sufficient time and a peaceful place in which to grow.  Egypt was that place. . . .

“. . . Palestine was a battleground for warring nations that moved back and forth in their conquests between the Nile and the Euphrates.  Israel would have found no peace there.  They required stable conditions for their eventual growth and development. . . .

“Their bondage certainly was not all on the negative side.  It too served a good purpose.  The cruelty of the taskmasters, the hatred that existed between the Hebrews and the Egyptians, and the length of their trying servitude fused Jacob’s children into a united people. . . .

“The hatred they felt toward the Egyptians prevented intermarriage between the Hebrews and their neighbors.  To reap the benefits of the Abrahamic promises, Israel had to remain a pure race, and the Lord used this means to achieve it. . . .

“Yes, Egypt had her role in the Lord’s mighty drama, and she played it well.

“At the end of 430 years, the Lord now decreed that the time had arrived for Israel to occupy her own land and there become that ‘peculiar people’ who would await the coming of their Messiah.”  (Petersen, Moses, pp. 27-30) Old Testament Student Manual, p. 103

But Joseph [of Eqypt] was also willing to act, using both his gifts and his challenges to respond to specific needs in his world.  On several occasions, including in prison, he chose to use his spiritual gift to interpret people’s dreams.  This choice, in turn, opened up an opportunity to work for the pharaoh, storing food for the Egyptian people.  Because he was faithful and diligent in this assignment, Joseph was able to perform a life-saving mission, rescuing many, including his own family, from starvation.

Joseph’s gifts and his challenges combined to put him in a unique position to respond when famine came to the land.  Because Joseph was who he was and where he was and because he chose to act faithfully and obediently, he fulfilled a unique mission in serving the Lord, the people of Egypt, and his own family. — Jan Pinborough, “Your Mission in Life Is Now,” Ensign, June 2010, pp. 44-46    

Heavenly help may not be obvious.  We may not immediately see or know that some other burdens that would have come our way have been lifted, diverted from our door.

The Lord assures: “Behold, verily, verily, I say unto you that mine eyes are upon you.  I am in your midst and ye cannot see me” (D&C 38:7) — Elder David S. Baxter, “Leaving Adversity Behind,” Ensign, December 2012

The opportunity to be a blessing in the life of another often comes unexpectedly.  On one extremely cold Saturday night during the winter of 1983–84, Sister Monson and I drove several miles to the mountain valley of Midway, Utah, where we have a home.  The temperature that night was minus 24 degrees Fahrenheit (–31°C), and we wanted to make certain all was well at our home there.  We checked and found that it was fine, so we left to return to Salt Lake City.  We barely made it the few miles to the highway before our car stopped working.  We were completely stranded. I have seldom, if ever, been as cold as we were that night.

Reluctantly we began walking toward the nearest town, the cars whizzing past us. Finally one car stopped, and a young man offered to help. We eventually found that the diesel fuel in our gas tank had thickened because of the cold, making it impossible for us to drive the car.  This kind young man drove us back to our Midway home.  I attempted to reimburse him for his services, but he graciously declined.  He indicated that he was a Boy Scout and wanted to do a good turn. I identified myself to him, and he expressed his appreciation for the privilege to be of help.  Assuming that he was about missionary age, I asked him if he had plans to serve a mission.  He indicated he was not certain just what he wanted to do.

On the following Monday morning, I wrote a letter to this young man and thanked him for his kindness.  In the letter I encouraged him to serve a full-time mission.  I enclosed a copy of one of my books and underscored the chapters on missionary service.

About a week later the young man’s mother telephoned and advised that her son was an outstanding young man but that because of certain influences in his life, his long-held desire to serve a mission had diminished.  She indicated she and his father had fasted and prayed that his heart would be changed.  They had placed his name on the prayer roll of the Provo Utah Temple.  They hoped that somehow, in some way, his heart would be touched for good and he would return to his desire to fill a mission and to serve the Lord faithfully.  The mother wanted me to know that she looked upon the events of that cold evening as an answer to their prayers in his behalf.  I said, “I agree with you.”

After several months and more communication with this young man, Sister Monson and I were overjoyed to attend his missionary farewell prior to his departure for the Canada Vancouver Mission.

Was it chance that our paths crossed on that cold December night?  I do not for one moment believe so.  Rather, I believe our meeting was an answer to a mother’s and father’s heartfelt prayers for the son they cherished.

Again, my brothers and sisters, our Heavenly Father is aware of our needs and will help us as we call upon Him for assistance.  I believe that no concern of ours is too small or insignificant.  The Lord is in the details of our lives. President Thomas S. Monson, General Conference October 2012 General Conference

I fear that in this world of skeptics and pragmatists we are losing the spirit of those wonderful scriptural phrases:  “I will go and do;”  “I know not save the Lord commandeth me;” or “for a wise purpose in him, which purpose I know not.”  That’s the spirit of dedication, of commitment, of faith that we must show to the Lord as we go about our Father’s business in a significant way.  This is how we say in our own lives, “Because I have been given much, I too must give.” — Stanley A. Peterson, BYU Book of Mormon Symposium, Church News, August 20, 1994 p. 5