Quotes on Resurrection

See also: D&C 27:5; D&C 133; John 9:18; Matt. 28:9; Matthew 28; Mark 16; Luke 24; John 20 

All who have lived on the earth according to the best light they had, and would have received the fullness of the Gospel had it been preached to them, are worthy of a glorious resurrection, and will attain to this by being administered for, in the flesh, by those who have the authority.  All others will have a resurrection, and receive a glory, except those who have sinned against the Holy Ghost.  It is supposed by this people that we have all the ordinances in our possession for life and salvation, and exaltation, and that we are administering in these ordinances.  This is not the case.  We are in possession of all the ordinances that can be administered in the flesh; but there are other ordinances and administrations that must be administered beyond this world.  I know you would ask what they are.  I will mention one.  We have not, neither can we receive here, the ordinance and the keys of the resurrection.  They will be given to those who have passed off this stage of action and have received their bodies again, as many have already done and many more will.  They will be ordained, by those who hold the keys of the resurrection, to go forth and resurrect the Saints just as we receive the ordinance of baptism, then the keys of authority to baptize others for the remission of their sins.  This is one of the ordinances we cannot receive here, and there are many more.  We hold the authority to dispose of, alter and change the elements; but we have not received authority to organize native element, to even make a spear of grass grow. — Brigham Young, Journal of Discourses, p. 397

. . . the earth and its heaven shall, after passing away through death, be renewed again in immortality.  This earth is living and must die, but since it keeps the law it shall be restored through the resurrection by which it shall become celestialized and the above of celestial beings.  The next verse of this revelation explains this as follows:  [D&C 29:24-25]

“So we see that the Lord intends to save, not only the earth and the heavens, not only man who dwells upon the earth, but all things which he has created.  The animals, the fishes of the sea, the fowls of the air, as well as man, are to be recreated, or renewed, through the resurrection, for they too are living souls.”  (President Joseph Fielding Smith, Conference Report, Oct. 1928, pp. 99-100; see also D&C 88:17-19, 25-26.) Doctrine and Covenants Student Manual, p. 62

The greatest events of history are those that affect the greatest number of people for the longest periods.  By this standard, no event could be more important to individuals or nations than the resurrection of the Master.

The literal resurrection of every soul who has lived and died on earth is a certainty, and surely one should make careful preparation for this event.  A glorious resurrection should be the goal of every man and woman, for resurrection will be a reality. . . .

As one of His latter-day witnesses, I testify that He lives today.  He is a resurrected Being.  He is our Savior, our Lord, the very Son of God.  I testify that He will come again as our glorified, resurrected Lord.  That day is not far distant.  To all who accept Him as Savior and Lord, His literal resurrection means that life does not end at death, for He promised: “Because I live, ye shall live also.”  (John 14:19) — President Ezra Taft Benson, “The Meaning of Easter,” Ensign, April 1992, pp. 2-4

As all will be resurrected, your physical body will then be restored to its proper and perfect frame (see Alma 11:43; 40:20).  The day of your resurrection will be a day of judgment that will determine the kind of life you shall have hereafter. — Elder Russell M. Nelson, Ensign, November 1990, p. 75

Joseph Smith taught the doctrine that the infant child that was laid away in death would come up in the resurrection as a child; and, pointing to the mother of a lifeless child, he said to her: “You will have the joy, the pleasure, and satisfaction of nurturing this child, after is resurrection, until it reaches the full stature of its spirit.”  There is restitution, there is growth, there is development, after the resurrection from death.  I love this truth.  It speaks volumes of happiness, of joy and gratitude to my soul.  Thank the Lord he has revealed these principles to us. — President Joseph F. Smith, Gospel Doctrine, p. 455

Concerning resurrection, flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God, or the kingdom that God inherits or inhabits, but the flesh without the blood and the Spirit of God flowing in the veins instead of the blood, for blood is the part of the body that causes corruption.  Therefore we must be changed in the twinkle of an eye or have to lay down these tabernacles and leave the blood vanish away….Blood is the corruptible part of the tabernacles. — Joseph Smith, The Words of Joseph Smith, pp. 370-71

After the resurrection from the dead our bodies will be spiritual bodies, but they will be bodies that are tangible, bodies that have been purified, but they will nevertheless be bodies of flesh and bones.  They will not be blood bodies.  They will no longer be quickened by blood but quickened by the spirit which is eternal, and they shall become immortal and shall never die. — Joseph Fielding Smith, Doctrines of Salvation, Vol. 2, p. 285

Joseph Smith taught the doctrine that the infant child that was laid away in death would come up in the resurrection as a child; and, pointing to the mother of a lifeless child, he said to her: “You will have the joy, the pleasure, and satisfaction of nurturing this child, after is resurrection, until it reaches the full stature of its spirit.”  There is restitution, there is growth, there is development, after the resurrection from death.  I love this truth.  It speaks volumes of happiness, of joy and gratitude to my soul.  Thank the Lord he has revealed these principles to us. — President Joseph F. Smith, Gospel Doctrine, p. 455

Concerning resurrection, flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God, or the kingdom that God inherits or inhabits, but the flesh without the blood and the Spirit of God flowing in the veins instead of the blood, for blood is the part of the body that causes corruption.  Therefore we must be changed in the twinkle of an eye or have to lay down these tabernacles and leave the blood vanish away. . . . Blood is the corruptible part of the tabernacles. — Joseph Smith, The Words of Joseph Smith, pp. 370-71

After the resurrection from the dead our bodies will be spiritual bodies, but they will be bodies that are tangible, bodies that have been purified, but they will nevertheless be bodies of flesh and bones.  They will not be blood bodies.  They will no longer be quickened by blood but quickened by the spirit which is eternal, and they shall become immortal and shall never die. — President Joseph Fielding Smith, Doctrines of Salvation, Vol. 2, p. 285

Can a resurrected being eat food of earth?  A resurrected being can function upon any lower plane.  A resurrected personage can do anything that a mortal personage can do, and much besides. — Elder James E. Talmage, Conference Report, April 1928, p. 93

We will take the best men we can find among them – when they pass through the veil they are in happiness, they are in glory, they go among the disembodied spirits; but they do not go where there are resurrected bodies, for they cannot live there: a Prophet or an Apostle cannot live there.  They also go into the spiritual world to live with spirits.  Do they commune with the Father and Son?  The Father communes with them as He pleases, through the means of angels, or otherwise the Son and Holy Ghost.  This is the situation of the Prophet, the Apostle, and all Saints before they receive their resurrected bodies; but they are looking forward to the time when they shall receive their bodies from the dust; and those that have been faithful, probably, will now soon get their resurrected bodies.  Abraham has had his body long ago, and dwells with the Father and the Son, among all the Prophets and faithful Saints who received their resurrected bodies immediately after the resurrection of the Savior [Section 133:55].  They were then prepared to enter into the Father’s rest and be crowned with glory and eternal lives, but they were not prepared before.

No spirit of Saint or sinner, of the Prophet or him that kills the Prophet, is prepared for their final state:  All pass through the veil from this state and go into the world of spirits; and there they dwell, waiting for their final destiny. — Brigham Young, Journal of Discourses 6:293-294, August 15, 1852

I am confident that when we come back with our body again, there will be no aches or pains.  There will be no wrinkles or deformities.  I am sure that if we can imagine ourselves at our very best, physically, mentally, spiritually, that is the way we will come back – perhaps not as a child or youth, perhaps in sweet and glorious maturity, but not in age or infirmity or distress or pain or aches.

The meaning of death has not changed.  It releases a spirit for growth and development and places a body in the repair shop of Mother Earth, there to be recast, remolded into a perfect body, an immortal glorious temple, clean, whole, perfected, and ready for its occupant for eternity. Teaching of Spencer W. Kimball, p. 45

We are in possession of all the ordinances that can be administered in the flesh; but there are other ordinances and administrations that must be administered beyond this world.  I know you would ask what they are. I will mention one.  We have not, neither can we receive here, the ordinance and the keys of the resurrection.  They will be given to those who have passed off this stage of action and have received their bodies again, as many have already done and many more will.  They will be ordained, by those who hold the keys of the resurrection, to go forth and resurrect the Saints. . . .This is one of the ordinances we cannot receive here, and there are many more. — Elder John A. Widtsoe, comp., The Discourses of Brigham Young, p. 397

John 9:18 – “No man taketh it from me, but I lay it down of myself.  I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it again.  This commandment have I received of my Father.”

As the Father hath power in himself, so the Son hath power in himself.  Then the Father has some day laid down his body and taken it again, so he has a body of his own. So has his Son a body of his own.  So each one will be in his own body. (Joseph Smith, Discourse of 11 June 1843, recorded by Wilford Woodruff; WJS, 214; Discourse of 7 April 1844, recorded by Thomas Bullock; KFD, p. 31.)

What did Jesus say?  “As the Father hath power in himself, even so hath the Son power.”  To do what?  Why, what the Father did, to lay down his body and take it up again. Jesus, what are you going to do?  “To lay down my life as my Father did, that I might take it up again.” — Joseph Smith, Discourse of 7 April 1844, recorded by William Clayton; KFD, p. 30

Elder Howard W. Hunter proclaimed that “the doctrine of the Resurrection is the single most fundamental and crucial doctrine in the Christian religion. It cannot be overemphasized, nor can it be disregarded.  Without the Resurrection, the gospel of Jesus Christ becomes a litany of wise sayings and seemingly unexplainable miracles – but savings and miracles with no ultimate triumph. No, the ultimate triumph is in the ultimate miracle: for the first time in the history of mankind, one who was dead raised himself into living immortality.” — President Howard W. Hunter, Conference Report, April 1986, p. 18

There are two major resurrections: the resurrection of the just and the resurrection of the unjust.  The resurrection of the just includes those who will receive celestial glory and terrestrial glory.

President Joseph Fielding Smith wrote about the resurrection of the just:

“In modern revelation given to the Church, the Lord has made known more in relation to this glorious event.  There shall be at least two classes which shall have the privilege of the resurrection at this time: ‘First, those who shall dwell in the presence of God and his Christ forever and ever’; and second, honorable men, those who belong to the terrestrial kingdom as well as those of the celestial kingdom.

“At the time of the coming of Christ, ‘They who have slept in their graves shall come forth, for their graves shall be opened; and they also shall be caught up to meet him in the midst of the pillar of heaven.  They are Christ’s, the first fruits, they who shall descent with him first, and they who are first caught up to meet him; and all this by the voice of te sounding of the trump of the angel of God.’  These are the just, ‘whose names are written in heaven, where God and Christ are the judge of all.  These are they who are just men made perfect through Jesus the mediator of the new covenant, who wrought out this perfect atonement through the shedding of his own blood.’

“Following this great event, and after the Lord and the righteous who are caught up to meet him have descended upon the earth, there will come to pass another resurrection.  This may be considered as a part of the first, although it comes later.  In this resurrection will come forth those of terrestrial order, who were not worthy to be caught up to meet him, but who are worthy to come forth to enjoy the millennial reign.”  (Doctrines of Salvation, 2:296)

The first resurrection will extend into the Millennium and include all those worthy of the celestial kingdom who live and die during the thousand years. Doctrine and Covenants Student Manual, p. 163

The Prophet Joseph Smith taught the following concerning the resurrected body:  “As concerning the resurrection, I will surely say that all men will come from the grave as they are laid down.  Whether old or young; there will not be ‘added unto their stature one cubit,’ neither taken from it; all will be raised by the power of God, having spirit in their bodies, and not blood.  Children will be enthroned in the presence of God and the Lamb with bodies of the same stature that they had on earth. . . . ” History of the Church, 4:555-556

President Joseph F. Smith said that the same person, the same form and likeness, will come forth “Even to the wounds in the flesh.  Not that a person will always be marred by scars, wounds, deformities, defects or infirmities removed in their course, in their proper time, according to the merciful providence of God.” . . .

“He did not intend to teach that the adult who loses a leg will come forth without that leg until it can be grafted on after the resurrection.  Rather, his body will come forth complete in every part.  Deformities and the like will be corrected, if not immediately at the time of the uniting of the spirit and body, so soon thereafter that it will make no difference.  We may be sure that every man will receive his body in its perfect frame in the resurrection. — President Joseph F. Smith, Gospel Doctrine, 4th Ed., p. 30

Do we have the keys of resurrection?  Could you return to the earth as ones who would never again die – your own parents, your grandparents, your ancestors?  I buried my mother when I was eleven, my father when I was in my early twenties.  I have missed my parents much.  If I had the power of resurrection as did the Savior of the world, I would have been tempted to try to have kept them longer.  I have been called to speak in numerous funerals for people whom I have known, people whom I have loved, and people whom I have saved and held on to in a limited way.  We do not know of anyone who can resurrect the dead as did Jesus the Christ when he came back to mortality.

“[The keys] will be given to those who have passed off this stage of action and have received their bodies again. . . . They will be ordained, by those who hold the keys of the resurrection, to go forth and resurrect the Saints, just as we receive the ordinance of baptism then receive the keys of authority to baptize others for the remission of their sins. This is one of the ordinances we can not receive here [on the earth], and there are many more.” (JD, 15:137) — President Spencer W. Kimball, “Our Great Potential,” Ensign, May 1977

Now a good many people in the world do not know what the resurrection is.  Do you teach your children and your associates what it means? . . .  [The Savior’s] resurrection is plain to the Latter-day Saints who understand the gospel, but there are so many who do not understand what it means. . . . The purpose of the Gospel of Jesus Christ is to prepare every man, woman and child for the time when all those who have died will be brought forth from their graves, and when our Heavenly Father will establish his kingdom upon this earth and the righteous will dwell there and Jesus Christ will be our King and our Law-giver. Teachings of Presidents of the Church, George Albert Smith, Ch. 7, “The Immortality of the Soul”

Without the Resurrection, the gospel of Jesus Christ becomes a litany of wise sayings and seemingly unexplainable miracles – but sayings and miracles with no ultimate triumph.  No, the ultimate triumph is in the ultimate miracle: for the first time in the history of mankind, one who was dead raised himself into living immortality.  He was the Son of God, the Son of our immortal Father in Heaven, and his triumph over physical and spiritual death is the good news every Christian tongue should speak. — President Howard W. Hunter, Conference Report, April 1986

Those who have died in Jesus Christ may expect to enter into all that fruition of joy when they come forth, which they possessed or anticipated here. . . . I am glad I have the privilege of communicating to you some things which, if grasped closely, will be a help to you when earthquakes bellow, the clouds gather, the lightnings flash, and the storms are ready to burst upon you like peals of thunder.  Lay hold of these things and let not your knees or joints tremble, nor your hearts faint; and then what can earthquakes, wars and tornadoes do?  Nothing.  All your losses will be made up to you in the resurrection, provided you continue faithful.  By the vision of the Almighty I have seen it. . . .

Let these truths sink down in our hearts, that we may even here begin to enjoy that which shall be in full hereafter. Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Joseph Smith, (2007), p. 45

In all the history of the world there have been many great and wise souls, many of whom claimed special knowledge of God.  But when the Savior rose from the tomb, He did something no one had ever done.  He did something no one else could do.  He broke the bonds of death, not only for Himself but for all who have ever lived – the just and the unjust (see John 5:28–29). — Elder Joseph B. Wirthlin, “Dark Friday, Bright Sunday,” New Era, March 2008, p. 4

From [the] majestic world of spirits we enter the grand stage of life to prove ourselves obedient to all things commanded of God.  During mortality we grow from helpless infancy to inquiring childhood and then to reflective maturity.  We experience joy and sorrow, fulfillment and disappointment, success and failure.  We taste the sweet, yet sample the bitter.  This is mortality.

Then to each life comes the experience known as death.  None is exempt.  All must pass its portals. 

To most, there is something sinister and mysterious about this unwelcome visitor called death.  Perhaps it is a fear of the unknown which causes many to dread its coming . . . [The Savior’s] words to the grieving Martha and to His disciples today bring comfort to us:
” ‘I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live.” — President Thomas S. Monson, “Mrs. Patton – the Story Continues,” Ensign, November 2007, pp. 22-23

David O. McKay had a vision of the Celestial Kingdom:  I . . . beheld in a vision something infinitely sublime.  In the distance I beheld a beautiful white city. Though far away, yet I seemed to realize that trees with luscious fruit, shrubbery with gorgeously-tinted leaves, and flowers in perfect bloom abounded everywhere.  The clear sky above seemed to reflect these beautiful shades of color. I then saw a great concourse of people approaching the city.  Each one wore a white flowing robe, and a white headdress.  Instantly my attention seemed centered upon their Leader, and though I could see only the profile of his features and his body, I recognized him at once as my Savior!  The tint and radiance of his countenance were glorious to behold!  There was a peace about him which seemed sublime – it was divine!  The city, I understood, was his.  It was the City Eternal; and the people following him were to abide there in peace and eternal happiness.  But who were they?  As if the Savior read my thoughts, he answered by pointing to a semicircle that then appeared above them, and on which were written in gold the words:  “These Are They Who Have Overcome The World – Who Have Truly Been Born Again!” — President David O McKay, Cherished Experiences, p. 102

In this Easter season of the year – when we are reminded yet again of all Christ has done for us, how dependent we are upon his redeeming grace and personal resurrection, and how singular his name is in the power to dispel evil and death and save the human soul – may we all do more to respect and revere his holy name and gently, courteously encourage others to do the same. — President Howard W. Hunter, Conference Report, April 1993

Jesus is the first begotten from the dead, as you will understand.  Neither Enoch, Elijah, Moses, nor any other man that ever lived on earth, no matter how strictly he lived, ever obtained a resurrection until after Jesus Christ’s body was called from the tomb by the angel.  He was the first begotten from the dead.  He is the Master of the resurrection. Discourses of Brigham Young, 374

After the spirit leaves the body, it remains without a tabernacle in the spirit world until the Lord, by his law that he has ordained, brings to pass the resurrection of the dead.  When the angel who holds the keys of the resurrection shall sound his trumpet, then the peculiar fundamental principles that organized our bodies here, if we do honor to them, though they be deposited in the depths of the sea, and though one particle is in the north, another in the south, another in the east, and another in the west, will be brought together again in the twinkling of an eye, and our spirits will take possession of them.  We shall then be prepared to dwell with the Father and the Son, and we never can be prepared to dwell with them until then.  Spirits, when they leave their bodies, do not dwell with the Father and the Son, but live in the Spirit world, where there are places prepared for them.  Those who do honor to their tabernacles, and love and believe in the Lord Jesus Christ, must put off this mortality, or they cannot put on immortality.  This body must be changed, else it cannot be prepared to dwell in the glory of the Father. — Brigham Young, Journal of Discourses, 8:28

Now understand, to choose life is to choose principles that will lead you to an eternal increase, and nothing short of them will produce life in the resurrection for the faithful.  Those that choose death, make choice of the path which leads to the end of their organization.  The one leads to endless increase and progression, the other to the destruction. — Brigham Young, Journal of Discourses, 1:352

The earth will abide its creation, and will be counted worthy of receiving the blessings designed for it, and will ultimately roll back into the presence of God who formed it and established its mineral, vegetable, and animal kingdoms.  These will all be retained upon the earth, come forth in the resurrection, and abide for ever and for ever. — Brigham Young, Journal of Discourses, 8:8

In the Millennium, when the Kingdom of God is established on the earth in power, glory and perfection, and the reign of wickedness that has so long prevailed is subdued, the Saints of God will have the privilege of building their temples, and of entering into them, becoming, as it were, pillars in the temples of God, and they will officiate for their dead.  Then we will see our friends come up, and perhaps some that we have been acquainted with here. 

If we ask who will stand at the head of the resurrection in this last dispensation, the answer is – Joseph Smith, Junior, the Prophet of God.  He is the man who will be resurrected and receive the keys of the resurrection, and he will seal this authority upon others, and they will hunt up their friends and resurrect them when they shall have been officiated for, and bring them up.  And we will have revelations to know our forefathers clear back to Father Adam and Mother Eve, and we will enter into the temples of God and officiate for them.  Then man will be sealed to men until the chain is made perfect back to Adam, so that there will be a perfect chain of Priesthood from Adam to the winding-up scene. Discourses of Brigham Young, 116

In that first bright Easter morn, Peter and John ran with alarm to the empty tomb, into which had been placed the lifeless body of the Savior Jesus Christ just days before. Similar concern must have filled the mind of Mary Magdalene as she gazed into the sepulcher now void of the body of the Master.  Confusion and dismay were not to last, however, as the Resurrected Lord made manifest to those so dear to Him in life the reality of eternal life and the miracle of the Resurrection.  (See John 20.) 

We now rejoice with all of faithful Christendom at the marvelous message of the Resurrection.  By virtue of His loving gift of life, each of us will rise from the grave, body and spirit joined together inseparably throughout eternity. 

We proclaim that the “bands of death” (Mosiah 15:8) have, in very deed, been broken for the children of men.  Each of us may lay aside all wonder, all fear of the darkness of death and rejoice, “having a perfect brightness of hope.”  (3 Nephi 31:20) 

We offer our solemn testimony that He lives; that the blessings of the Resurrection will be realized for each of us.  We join with you in an expression of humble gratitude for His willing sacrifice and pray the blessings of heaven will attend us all, as we commemorate at this Easter time the hope and eternal promise of the Resurrection. — The First Presidency Easter Message [Gordon B. Hinckley, Thomas S. Monson, James E. Faust], March 1997

That the spirit of man passes triumphantly through the portals of death into everlasting life is one of the glorious messages given by Christ, our Redeemer.  To him this earthly career is but a day and its closing but the setting of life’s sun. Death, but a sleep, is followed by a glorious awakening in the morning of an eternal realm. . . . If everyone . . . knew that the crucified Christ actually rose on the third day – that after having greeted others and mingled with others in the spirit world, his spirit did again reanimate his pierced body, and after sojourning among men for the space of forty days, he ascended a glorified soul to his Father – what benign peace would come to souls now troubled with doubt and uncertainty! 

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints stands with Peter, with Paul, with James, and with all the other early apostles who accepted the resurrection not only as being literally true, but as the consummation of Christ’s divine mission on earth. Teachings of Presidents of the Church: David O. McKay, pp. 65-66

The resurrection of Jesus Christ is one of the greatest messages of all Christianity. It is a divine gift from a loving Father to all mankind.  The Savior’s arms are stretched forth to us all, who, by accepting Him in His appointed way, may become not just believers but true disciples and with Paul hope to “obtain a better resurrection” (Hebrews 11:35). 

Despite the sting of death and the loneliness of separation from loved ones who have gone to the grave, in our hour of deepest sorrow and trial we draw hope and peace and certitude from the words of the angel that first Easter morning, “He is not here: for he is risen, as he said” (Matthew 28:6).  “Thanks be to God, which giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ” (1 Corinthians 15:57). 

Jesus is our King, our Lord, our Master, the living and resurrected Christ, who stands on the right hand of His Father.  He lives!  He lives, resplendent and wonderful, the living Son of the living God.  Of this we bear solemn, personal testimony at this season of rejoicing, this Easter season when we commemorate the miracle of the empty tomb. — First Presidency Easter Message [Gordon B. Hinckley, Thomas S. Monson, James E. Faust], 2003

Of all the tests we face, none hurts more than the death of a loved one.  Through the resurrection of Jesus Christ all are delivered from death, and all will rise in the Resurrection.  And by the Atonement of Jesus Christ, all may gain peace in this life washed clean from the sorrows of sin and have hope of a glorious resurrection with the just. 

At this Easter season we give our sure witness that Jesus is the Christ, the Redeemer of all mankind.  Because of His atoning sacrifice, He stands as our Advocate and Savior.  Though He was crucified, He rose triumphant from the tomb to our everlasting blessing and benefit. — First Presidency Easter Message [Thomas S. Monson, Henry B. Eyring, Dieter F. Uchtdorf], LDS Church News, March 31, 2013

President Joseph Smith (1805–44):

How consoling to the mourners when they are called to part with a husband, wife, father, mother, child, or dear relative, to know that, although the earthly tabernacle is laid down and dissolved, they shall rise again to dwell in everlasting burnings in immortal glory, not to sorrow, suffer, or die any more, but they shall be heirs of God and joint heirs with Jesus Christ.  (Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Joseph Smith (2007), 52) — “Death and Life, Pioneer Perspectives on the Resurrection,” Ensign, April 2013, p. 50

President Brigham Young (1801–77):

What a dark valley and a shadow it is that we call death!  To pass from this state of existence as far as the mortal body is concerned, into a state of inanition [emptiness], how strange it is!  How dark this valley is!  How mysterious is this road, and we have got to travel it alone.  I would like to say to you, my friends and brethren, if we could see things as they are, and as we shall see and understand them, this dark shadow and valley is so trifling that we shall turn round and look about upon it and think, when we have crossed it, why this is the greatest advantage of my whole existence, for I have passed from a state of sorrow, grief, mourning, woe, misery, pain, anguish and disappointment into a state of existence, where I can enjoy life to the fullest extent as far as that can be done without a body.  (Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Brigham Young (1997), 273) — “Death and Life, Pioneer Perspectives on the Resurrection,” Ensign, April 2013, p. 52

President Lorenzo Snow (1814–1901):

In the next life we will have our bodies glorified and free from sickness and death. Nothing is so beautiful as a person in a resurrected and glorified condition.  There is nothing more lovely than to be in this condition and have our wives and children and friends with us.  (Lorenzo Snow, in Conference Report, Oct. 1900, 63) — “Death and Life, Pioneer Perspectives on the Resurrection,” Ensign, April 2013, p. 55

The assurance that the resurrection will include an opportunity to be with our family members – husband, wife, parents, brothers and sisters, children, and grandchildren – is a powerful encouragement for us to fulfill our family responsibilities in mortality.  It helps us live together in love in this life in anticipation of joyful reunions and associations in the next.  – and, finally – 

The assurance of immortality also helps us bear the mortal separations involved in the death of our loved ones.  Every one of us has wept at a death, grieved through a funeral, or stood in pain at a graveside.  I am surely one who has.  We should all praise God for the assured resurrection that makes our mortal separations temporary and gives us the hope and strength to carry on. — Elder Dallin H. Oaks, “Resurrection,” General Conference, April 1, 2000

As Christ lived after death so shall all men live, each taking his place in the next world for which he has best fitted himself.  The message of the resurrection, therefore, is the most comforting, the most glorious ever given to man, for when death takes a loved one from us, our sorrowing hearts are assuaged by the hope and the divine assurance expressed in the words: 

“He is not here: he is risen.”  Because our Redeemer lives, so shall we.  I bear you witness that he does live.  I know it, as I hope you know that divine truth.  May all mankind some day have that faith. — President David O. McKay, Gospel Ideals, p. 48