Quotes on Scriptures

See also: Ether 4:16; D&C 107:57; 2 Nephi 29:13; Moses 1:41

The prophet recorded in his personal history: “With W. W. Phelps and Oliver Cowdery as scribes, I commenced the translation of some of the characters or hieroglyphics, and much to our joy found that one of the rolls contained the writings of Abraham, another the writings of Joseph of Egypt, etc., – a more full account of which will appear in its place, as I proceed to examine or unfold them.  Truly we can say, the Lord is beginning to reveal the abundance of peace and truth.”

There is no doubt that the Prophet Joseph Smith regarded the manner in which these writings came to him as the result of divine intercession. . . 

We have reason to believe that the book of Abraham was a lengthy record in its original form.  It was said that when completed, the full text of the book would be more lengthy; Oliver Cowdery spoke of volumes that would be necessary to contain it.  But at the close of its fifth chapter, the book we have seems to end somewhat abruptly, and after the presentation of so many powerful teachings and remarkable insights in such a short space, we are left hungering for more.

One scholar has written that had the Prophet Joseph Smith’s last 16 months not been so turbulent, he likely would have given us more, as he had promised. — Andrew Skinner, [professor of ancient scripture at BYU,] “The Book of Abraham, A Most Remarkable Book,” Ensign, March 1997, p. 19

If you pray for an angel to visit you, you know what he’ll do if he comes?  He’ll just quote the scriptures to you – so you know you’re wasting your time waiting for what we already have.  I’m quite serious about that. — Hugh Nibley

I fear that many of us rush about from day to day taking for granted the holy scriptures.  We scramble to honor appointments with physicians, lawyers, and businessmen.  Yet we think nothing of postponing interviews with Deity–postponing scripture study.  Little wonder we develop anemic souls and lose our direction in living.  How much better it would be if we planned and held sacred daily reading of the scriptures.  Such interviews with Deity would help us recognize his voice and enable us to receive guidance in all of our affairs. — Elder Carlos Asay, Ensign, November 1978, p. 53

Search the Scriptures – search the revelations which we publish and ask your Heavenly Father, in the name of His son Jesus Christ, to manifest the truth unto you, and if you do it with an eye single to His glory, nothing doubting, He will answer you by the power of His Holy Spirit  You will then know for yourselves and not for another.  You will not then be dependent on man for the knowledge of God; nor will there be any room for speculation. . . . For when men receive their instruction from Him that made them, they know how He will save them. . . . Again we say:  Search the Scriptures, search the Prophets and learn what portion of them belongs to you. — Joseph Smith

Our temporal bodies would soon become emaciated if we fed them only once a week, or twice, as some of us are in the habit of feeding our spiritual and religious bodies. — President Joseph F. Smith

Success in righteousness, the power to avoid deception and resist temptation, guidance in our daily lives, healing of the soul – these are but a few of the promises the Lord has given to those who will come to His word. . . . However diligent we may be in other areas, certain blessings are to be found only in the scriptures, only in coming to the word of the Lord and holding fast to it as we make our way through the mists of darkness to the tree of life. — President Ezra Taft Benson

I am convinced that each of us, at least sometime in our lives, must discover the scriptures for ourselves – and not just discover them once, but rediscover them again and again. . . .

The Lord is not trifling with us when He gives us these things, for “unto whomsoever much is given, of him shall be much required.”  (Luke 12:48)  Access to these things means responsibility for them.  We must study the scriptures according to the Lord’s commandment; and we must let them govern our lives. — President Spencer W. Kimball, Ensign, September 1976, p. 5

The very reading of the scriptures puts us in touch with what God said to others in other days.  It thereby creates an atmosphere into which new inspiration can come, if needed. — Elder Neal A. Maxwell, Things As They Really Are, p. 106

For his own reasons, the Lord provides answers to some questions, with pieces placed here and there throughout the scriptures.  We are to find them; we are to earn them.  In that way sacred things are hidden from the insincere. — Elder Boyd K. Packer, “The Mystery of Life,” Ensign, November 1983, p. 17

Because we believe that scripture reading can help us receive revelation, we are encouraged to read the scriptures again and again.  By this means, we obtain access to what our Heavenly Father would have us know and do in our personal lives today.  That is one reason Latter-day Saints believe in daily scripture study.

Similarly, what a scripture in the Book of Mormon meant to me when I first read it at age sixteen is not conclusive upon me as I read it at age sixty.  With the benefit of my life’s experiences and with my greater familiarity with revelation, I can learn things that were not available to me yesterday by reading the scriptures today. — Elder Dallin H. Oaks, “Scripture Reading and Revelation,” Ensign, January 1995, p. 8

I do not consider myself a scholar of the scriptures. The reason I read the scriptures is not for scholarship; rather, it is a love affair with the words of Christ and the prophets. — President Gordon B. Hinckley

My brethren and sisters, all the truth that is advocated in all the teachings of men, necessary for our salvation, is contained within the lids of the books that I have already enumerated [the Standard Works].  We may not possess a library of two or three thousand volumes, but we may possess at small cost a priceless library that has cost the best blood that has ever been in this world.  Will our Father hold us guiltless when we go home, if we have failed to teach our children the importance of these sacred records?  I think not.  He called his sons one by one, and they gave their lives that we might have the Old Testament.  He sent his only begotten Son into the world, and his life was sacrificed in order that we might have the teachings of the New Testament.  The prophets of God recorded in the Book of Mormon laid down their lives and sealed their testimonies with their blood, in order that the children of men might know what the Father desired of them.  He sent the Prophet Joseph Smith, and he gave his life, together with his brother Hyrum, in order that we might have the truths contained in the sacred record known as the Doctrine and Covenants.  Do you suppose that after the Lord has done all this for us, has given to this world the choicest and sweetest of men and women, whose lives have been dedicated to the blessing of mankind, many of them sealing their testimony with their blood, has placed within our reach the excellent teachings contained in these holy records, that he will consider us appreciative if we fail to teach them to our families, and to impress them upon those with whom we come in contact?

Brethren and sisters, I desire to emphasize again the teaching of the Master; “search the scriptures”; read them prayerfully and faithfully; teach them in your homes; call your families around you and inspire in them a faith in the living God, by reading those things that have been revealed.  They are the most precious of all the libraries in all the world. — President George Albert Smith, Conference Report, October 1917, p. 44

Brothers and sisters, without reservation I promise you that if you will prayerfully read the Book of Mormon, regardless of how many times you previously have read it, there will come into your hearts an added measure of the Spirit of the Lord.  There will come a strengthened resolution to walk in obedience to his commandments, and there will come a stronger testimony of the living reality of the Son of God. — President Gordon B. Hinckley, “The Power of the Book of Mormon,” Ensign, June 1988, p. 6

By searching the holy scriptures, we access a vast, divine data bank, a reservoir of remembrance.  In this way the scriptures can, as the Book of Mormon says, enlarge the memory (see Alma 37:8). — Elder Neal A. Maxwell, Ensign, May 1991, pp. 89-90

It is not enough to read the scriptures.  Random reading results in reduced retention.  We must search for specifics.  We must seek for truth and increased understanding of its application in our lives.  If we are to be effective in our study of the scriptures, we must prepare for it to be a special spiritual experience. — Elder L. Lionel Kendrick, Ensign, May 1993, p. 13

The Holy Ghost will guide what we say if we study and ponder the scriptures every day.  The words of the scriptures invite the Holy Spirit.  The Lord said it this way:  “Seek not to declare my word, but first seek to obtain my word, and then shall your tongue be loosed; then, if you desire, you shall have my Spirit and my word, yea, the power of God unto the convincing of men” (D&C 11:21).  With daily study of the scriptures, we can count on this blessing even in casual conversations or in a class when we may be asked by a teacher to respond to a question.  We will experience the power the Lord promised: “Neither take ye thought beforehand what ye shall say; but treasure up in your minds continually the words of life, and it shall be given you in the very hour that portion that shall be meted unto every man” (D&C 84:85).

We treasure the word of God not only by reading the words of the scriptures but by studying them.  We may be nourished more by pondering a few words, allowing the Holy Ghost to make them treasures to us, than to pass quickly and superficially over whole chapters of scripture. — President Henry B. Eyring, “Feed My Lambs,” Ensign, November 1997, p. 84

Pondering, which means to weigh mentally, to deliberate, to meditate, can achieve the opening of the spiritual eyes of ones understanding.  Also, the Spirit of the Lord may rest upon the ponderer. . . .

And Jesus admonished the Nephites, “Therefore, go ye unto your homes, and ponder upon the things which I have said, and ask of the Father, in my name, that ye may understand.” (3 Ne. 17:3.)

We are constantly reminded through the scriptures that we should give the things of God much more than usual superficial consideration.  We must ponder them and reach into the very essence of what we are and what we may become. — Elder Joseph B. Wirthlin, “Pondering Strengthens the Spiritual Life,” Ensign, May 1982, p. 23

We are so wound up in programs and statistics and trends, in properties, lands and mammon, and in achieving goals that will highlight the excellence of our work, that we have omitted the weightier matters of the law.  However talented men may be in administrative matters; however eloquent they may be in expressing their views; however learned they may be in the worldly things – they will be denied the sweet whisperings of the Spirit that might have been theirs unless they pay the price of studying, pondering, and praying about the scriptures. — Elder Bruce R. McConkie, Regional Representatives Seminar, 2 Apr. 1982, p. 12; Ensign, May 1986, p. 81

There are those who have made a casual, even an insincere effort to test the scriptures and have come away having received nothing, which is precisely what they have earned and what they deserve.  If you think it will yield to a casual inquiry, to idle curiosity, or even to well- intentioned but temporary searching, you are mistaken.  It likewise will not yield to the overzealous or to the fanatic.

It is when a lifetime is quietly committed with sincerity and humility that one can know for sure.  Many elements of truth come only after a lifetime of preparation.

A testimony of them, however, can come very quickly.  Do not belittle the possibility that many humble folk, young and old, possess such a testimony.  Many possess a testimony that transcends the knowledge to be gained in academic and scientific fields.  When a humble man bears testimony based on spiritual inquiry and righteous living, be careful before you repudiate his witness because he is otherwise unlearned. — Elder Boyd K. Packer, “We Believe All That God Has Revealed,” Ensign, May 1974, p. 9

President John Taylor has wisely taught, “I would not only search the scriptures that we now have, but I would search also every revelation that God has given, does give, or will give for the guidance and direction of his people, and I would seek to be governed by the principles that are contained in that sacred word.”  (The Gospel Kingdom, pp. 35-36.)  We hope, therefore, that you will also make a study of the conference reports part of your scripture study. — President Howard W. Hunter, “This Is My Gospel.” Tucson Regional Conference, Tucson, Arizona, 18 September 1994; Teachings of Howard W. Hunter, pp. 53-54

I know that with the demands of daily living there is little time to read anything.  But I promise you that if you will read that which we call scripture, there will come into your heart an understanding and a warmth that will be pleasing to experience.  “Search the scriptures; for in them ye think ye have eternal life: and they are they which testify of me.”

(John 5:39)  Read, for instance, the Gospel of John from its beginning to its end.  Let the Lord speak for himself to you, and his words will come with a quiet conviction that will make the words of his critics meaningless.  Read also the testament of the New World, the Book of Mormon, brought forth as another witness that JESUS is the CHRIST, the ETERNAL GOD, manifesting himself unto all nations. — President Gordon B. Hinckley, “He Is Risen, As He Said,” Ensign, April 1983, p. 7

Just as continuing revelation enlarges and illuminates the scriptures, so also a study of the scriptures enables men and women to receive revelations.  Elder Bruce R. McConkie said, “I sometimes think that one of the best-kept secrets of the kingdom is that the scriptures open the door to the receipt of revelation” (Doctrines of the Restoration, p. 243).  This happens because scripture reading puts us in tune with the Spirit of the Lord.

The idea that scripture reading can lead to inspiration and revelation opens the door to the truth that a scripture is not limited to what it meant when it was written but may also include what that scripture means to a reader today.  Even more, scripture reading may also lead to current revelation on whatever else the Lord wishes to communicate to the reader at that time.  We do not overstate the point when we say that the scriptures can be a Urim and Thummim to assist each of us to receive personal revelation. — Elder Dallin H. Oaks, “Scripture Reading and Revelation,” Ensign, January 1995, p. 8

What a glorious blessing! For when we want to speak to God, we pray. And when we want Him to speak to us, we search the scriptures; for His words are spoken through His prophets. He will then teach us as we listen to the promptings of the Holy Spirit. –- Robert D. Hales, “Holy Scriptures: The Power of God Unto Our Salvation,” General Conference, October 2006

I do not claim to be a scholar of the scriptures.  I do read the scriptures for scholarship.  I read them because I have a love affair with them.  I love to read the words of the prophets. — President Gordon B. Hinckley

“. . . any tools that assist in the reading and studying of the scriptures are useful and are likely to promote familiarity with these sacred volumes.  Such activity invariably will lead to an increase not only of knowledge, but also of faith.”  (Gordon B. Hinckley, Second Counselor in the First Presidency, 1985)

He talked about his love of the scriptures and how reading the scriptures was not the pursuit of scholarship but “rather, it is a love affair with the word of the Lord and that of His prophets.  They contain so much for each of us.”

President Hinckley then went on to bear his testimony regarding the scriptures: “As I read these sacred volumes I marvel at the wonder and the majesty of the Almighty God and His Beloved Son, the Lord Jesus Christ.  All of the writers of these testaments sing the praises of God our Father and of our Redeemer.  The scriptures testify of the Father and the Son – of their majesty and wonder.  The scriptures invite all to come unto the Father and the Son and to find peace and strength in the union between God and man. — Church News, September 28, 2002, p. 16

Occasionally we hear certain Latter-day Saint teachings described as unbiblical or of a particular doctrine being contradictory to the Bible.  Let us be clear on this matter….

Supplementation is not the same as contradiction.  All of the prophets, including the Savior himself, were sent to bring new light and knowledge to the world; in many cases, new scripture came as a result of their ministry.  That new scripture did not invalidate what went before, nor did it close the door to subsequent revelation.

We feel deep gratitude for the holy scriptures, but we do not worship scripture.  Nor do we feel it appropriate to set up stakes and bounds to the works and ways of the Almighty, to tell God, essentially, “Thus far and no more.”

As the Lord declared through Nephi, “Wherefore, because that ye have a Bible ye need not suppose that it contains all my words; neither need ye suppose that I have not caused more to be written” (2 Nephi 29:10). — Robert Millet, “What We Believe,” BYU Devotional, February 3, 1998, p. 2

Today we carry convenient quadruple combinations of the scriptures, but one day, since more scriptures are coming, we may need to pull little red wagons brimful with books. — Elder Neal A. Maxwell, A Wonderful Flood of Light, p. 18

Scripture reading may . . . lead to current revelation on whatever (subject) the Lord wants to communicate to the reader at that time.  We do not overstate the point when we say that the scriptures can be a Urim and Thummim to assist each of us to receive personal revelation. — Elder Dallin H. Oaks, Ensign, January 1995, p. 8

No message appears in scripture more times, in more ways than “Ask, and ye shall receive.” — Elder Boyd K. Packer, Conference Reports, October 1991, p. 26

President John Taylor has wisely taught, “I would not only search the scriptures that we now have, but I would search also every revelation that God has given, does give, or will give for the guidance and direction of his people, and I would seek to be governed by the principles that are contained in that sacred word.”  (The Gospel Kingdom, pp. 35-36)  We hope, therefore, that you will also make a study of the conference reports part of your scripture study. — Howard W. Hunter, “This Is My Gospel,” Tucson Regional Conference, Tucson, Arizona, 18 September 1994; Teachings of Howard W. Hunter, pp. 53-54

Just as continuing revelation enlarges and illuminates the scriptures, so also a study of the scriptures enables men and women to receive revelations.  Elder Bruce R. McConkie said, “I sometimes think that one of the best-kept secrets of the kingdom is that the scriptures open the door to the receipt of revelation” (Doctrines of the Restoration, p. 243).  This happens because scripture reading puts us in tune with the Spirit of the Lord.

The idea that scripture reading can lead to inspiration and revelation opens the door to the truth that a scripture is not limited to what it meant when it was written but may also include what that scripture means to a reader today.  Even more, scripture reading may also lead to current revelation on whatever else the Lord wishes to communicate to the reader at that time.  We do not overstate the point when we say that the scriptures can be a Urim and Thummim to assist each of us to receive personal revelation. — Elder Dallin H. Oaks, “Scripture Reading and Revelation,” Ensign, January 1995, p. 8

The Lord not only manifests Himself to all nations; He also commands that they write His words:

“Know ye not that the testimony of two nations is a witness unto you that I am God, that I remember one nation like unto another? Wherefore, I speak the same words unto one nation like unto another. . . .

” . . . For I command all men . . . that they shall write the words which I speak unto them. . . .

“For behold, I shall speak unto the Jews and they shall write it; and I shall also speak unto the Nephites and they shall write it; and I shall also speak unto the other tribes of the house of Israel, which I have led away, and they shall write it; and I shall also speak unto all nations of the earth and they shall write it” (2 Nephi 29:8, 11–12; see also 1 Nephi 13:38–39).

Furthermore, the Book of Mormon teaches that all of these groups will have the writings of the others (see 2 Nephi 29:13).

We conclude from this that the Lord will eventually cause the inspired teachings He has given to His children in various nations to be brought forth for the benefit of all people. This will include accounts of the visit of the resurrected Lord to what we call the lost tribes of Israel and His revelations to all the seed of Abraham. The finding of the Dead Sea Scrolls shows one way this can occur.

When new writings come forth – and according to prophecy they will – we hope they will not be treated with the rejection some applied to the Book of Mormon because they already had a Bible (see 2 Nephi 29:3 – 10).  As the Lord said through a prophet in that book, “And because that I have spoken one word ye need not suppose that I cannot speak another; for my work is not yet finished; neither shall it be until the end of man” (2 Nephi 29:9). — Elder Dallin H. Oaks, “All Men Everywhere,” Ensign, May 2006, p. 80

At the outset of Joseph Smith’s ministry in 1823, Moroni hinted that the Bible text was not infallible when he quoted Malachi 4:1 differently to Joseph than it appeared in the King James Version. The Prophet Joseph would later write in 1832, “From sundry revelations which have been received, it was apparent that many important points touching the salvation of man, had been taken from the Bible, or lost before it was compiled” (History of the Church, 1:245).  He also wrote, “I believe the Bible as it read when it came from the pen of the original writers. Ignorant translators, careless transcribers, or designing and corrupt priests have committed many errors.”  Teachings of the Prophet Joseph Smith, 327

More than at any time in our history we have need for greater spirituality.  The way to develop greater spirituality is to feast on the words of Christ as revealed in the scriptures. One of the most significant happenings in recent Church history is the publication of the new editions of the standard works with the new footnotes and other helps.  I think we can say without exaggeration that never before in any dispensation have the Saints been so abundantly blessed with the words of the Lord and His prophets.  Now our challenge is to do as the Lord commanded: “Study my word which hath gone forth among the children of men” (D&C 11:22). — President Ezra Taft Benson, Conference Report, April 1984, p. 7

This wasn’t just an ordinary event in which a troubled boy turned to the scriptures for help.  It was a momentous occurrence planned and prepared for before the earth’s creation.  There was to be a restoration of the fulness of the gospel to prepare for the second coming of the Savior, and Joseph Smith, who had been foreordained for this purpose, would be the instrument of that restoration. The Bible – now in his own language and at his fingertips – was a catalyst which led Joseph Smith to his prophetic role. — Lenet H. Read, “How the Bible Came to Be: Part 8, The Power of the Word,” Ensign, September 1982, p. 66

I have often thought that Nephi’s being bound with cords and beaten by rods must have been more tolerable to him than listening to Laman and Lemuel’s constant murmuring.  Surely he must have said at least once, ”Hit me one more time.  I can still hear you.”  Yes, life has its problems, and yes, there are negative things to face, but please accept one of Elder Holland’s maxims for living – no misfortune is so bad that whining about it won’t make it worse. — Elder Jeffrey R. Holland, Ensign, May 2006, p. 18

Elder M. Russell Ballard was visited by a former missionary who told him that he thought he was losing his testimony.  He had been reading anti-Church literature and had questions that his bishop and stake president had not answered for him.

Elder Ballard could see it would take some time to research answers to the questions, so he asked the man to come back in 10 days.  As he was leaving, Elder Ballard asked him how long it had been since he had read from the Book of Mormon.  It had been a long time.  Elder Ballard elicited a promise from him that, for the next 10 days, he would read at least an hour a day from the Book of Mormon.

“Ten days later, he came back,” Elder Ballard recounted.  “I pulled out my paper to start the answers, and he said, ‘President, it won’t be necessary for you to answer my questions.’  Then tears came streaming down his cheeks as he explained, ‘President, I know the Book of Mormon is true.  I know Joseph Smith is a prophet.’

“I responded, ‘Well, I’m very happy to hear that, but you’re going to get answers to your questions anyway.  I worked a long time on this; you just listen and you will get the answers to your questions.’  I asked, ‘Elder, what have you learned from this?’  And he said, ‘Give the Lord equal time.’”

Elder Ballard told members of the congregation they would never be challenged beyond their ability to resist if they give equal time to the Lord through study, pondering and praying about the gospel as found in the Standard Works of the Church. — R. Scott Lloyd, “An age-old battle,” Church News, November 22, 2008, p. 7

The holy scriptures represent mankind’s spiritual memory. And when man’s connection with scripture is severed, mortals are tragically deprived of an awareness of spiritual history, blinding the eyes of faith.  Thereby shorn of true identity, mortals keep their legs intact, but each walks in his own way. Their arms are acquisitive, but do not reach out in an understanding embrace of life. Their ears function, but they no longer hear the word of the Lord.  Though created in God’s image, those thus severed soon forget their Maker. Yet it is not surprising, “For how knoweth a man the master whom he has not served, and who is a stranger unto him, and is far from the thoughts and intents of his heart?” (Mosiah 5:13).

By contrast, one of the unique features of the living church of Jesus Christ is its ever-expanding body of fundamental spiritual knowledge about man’s identity and purpose, which enlarges “the memory of this people” (Alma 37:8).  In fact, our ninth article of faith declares that God “will yet reveal many great and important things pertaining to the Kingdom of God.” [A of F 1:9] Thus nourished by a menu blending antiquity and futurity, Church members need never “faint in [their] minds” (Heb. 12:3). Instead, we can be intellectually vibrant.

Lost books are among the treasures yet to come forth.  Over twenty of these are mentioned in the existing scriptures.  Perhaps most startling and voluminous will be the records of the lost tribes of Israel (see 2 Ne. 29:13).  We would not even know of the impending third witness for Christ except through the precious Book of Mormon, the second witness for Christ!  This third set of sacred records will thus complete a triad of truth.  Then, just as the Perfect Shepherd has said, “My word also shall be gathered in one” (2 Ne. 29:14).  There will be “one fold and one shepherd” (1 Ne. 22:25) in a welding together of all the Christian dispensations of human history (see D&C 128:18).

Whereas previous prophets were sometimes left to surmise – as Moroni supposed the Jews also had a record of the Creation from Adam on down (see Ether 1:3) – ours, instead, is a time of fulness, including “things which never have been revealed from the foundation of the world” (D&C 128:18).  Moreover, “and the day cometh that the words of the book which were sealed shall be read upon the house tops; and they shall be read by the power of Christ; and all things shall be revealed unto the children of men which ever have been among the children of men, and which ever will be even unto the end of the earth” (2 Ne. 27:11; see also 2 Ne. 30:16, 18; Ether 4:7; D&C 101:32; D&C 121:28). — Elder Neal A. Maxwell, “God Will Yet Reveal,” Ensign, November 1986, p. 52

The scriptures enlarge our memory by helping us always to remember the Lord and our relationship to Him and the Father.  They remind us of what we knew in our premortal life.  And they expand our memory in another sense by teaching us about epochs, people, and events that we did not experience personally.  None of us was present to see the Red Sea part and cross with Moses between walls of water to the other side. We were not there to hear the Sermon on the Mount, to see Lazarus raised from the dead, to see the suffering Savior in Gethsemane and on the cross, and we did not, with Mary, hear the two angels testify at the empty tomb that Jesus was risen from the dead.  You and I did not go forward one by one with the multitude in the land Bountiful at the resurrected Savior’s invitation to feel the prints of the nails and bathe His feet with our tears.  We did not kneel beside Joseph Smith in the Sacred Grove and gaze there upon the Father and the Son. Yet we know all these things and much, much more because we have the scriptural record to enlarge our memory, to teach us what we did not know.  And as these things penetrate our minds and hearts, our faith in God and His Beloved Son takes root.

The scriptures also enlarge our memory by helping us not forget what we and earlier generations have learned.  Those who either don’t have or ignore the recorded word of God eventually cease to believe in Him and forget the purpose of their existence. — Elder D. Todd Christofferson, “The Blessing of Scripture,” Ensign, May 2010, p. 33

Consider the magnitude of our blessing to have the Holy Bible and some 900 additional pages of scripture, including the Book of Mormon, the Doctrine and Covenants, and the Pearl of Great Price.  Then consider that, in addition, the words of prophets spoken as they are moved upon by the Holy Ghost in settings such as this, which the Lord calls scripture (see D&C 68:2–4), flow to us almost constantly by television, radio, Internet, satellite, CD, DVD, and in print.  I suppose that never in history has a people been blessed with such a quantity of holy writ.  And not only that, but every man, woman, and child may possess and study his or her own personal copy of these sacred texts, most in his or her own language.  Surely with this blessing the Lord is telling us that our need for constant recourse to the scriptures is greater than in any previous time. — Elder D. Todd Christofferson, “The Blessing of Scripture,” Ensign, May 2010, p. 35

Thus, just as there will be many more Church members, families, wards, stakes, and temples – later on, there will also be many more nourishing and inspiring scriptures. However, we must first feast worthily upon that which we already have! . . .

Without this precious, spiritual perspective, the human family is seldom more than one generation away from deep doubt and even disbelief. . . . — Elder Neal A. Maxwell, “God Will Yet Reveal,” Ensign, November 1986

I would like to call your attention to one thing in the Book of Mormon.  The Lord has promised us greater knowledge, greater understanding than we find in the Book of Mormon, when we are prepared to receive it.  When the brother of Jared went upon the mount to have the Lord touch stones to give them light to light their way across the great ocean, the Lord revealed to him the history of this world from the beginning of it to the end.  We do not have it. . . . Now the Lord has placed us on probation as members of the Church.  He has given us the Book of Mormon, which is the lesser part, to build up our faith through our obedience to the counsels which it contains, and when we ourselves, members of the Church, are willing to keep the commandments as they have been given to us and show our faith as the Nephites did for a short period of time, then the Lord is ready to bring forth the other record and give it to us, but we are not ready now to receive it.  Why?  Because we have not lived up to the requirements in this probationary state in the reading of the record which had been given to us and in following its counsels. — President Joseph Fielding Smith, Conference Report, October 1961, pp. 19-20

“Search the scriptures,” was the command of Jesus, “for in them ye think ye have eternal life: and they are they that testify of me.” (John 5:39)  I would not only search the scriptures that we now have, but I would search also every revelation that God has given, does give, or will give for the guidance and direction of his people, and then I would reverence the Giver, and those also whom he makes use of as his honored instruments to promulgate and make known those principles; and I would seek to be governed by the principles that are contained in that sacred word. — President John Taylor, Journal of Discourses, Vol. 16, p. 371, February 1, 1874

Neither the Bible nor the Book of Mormon in and of themselves is sufficient.  Both are necessary for us to teach and learn about the full and complete doctrine of Christ.  The need for the other does not diminish either one of them.  Both the Bible and the Book of Mormon are necessary for our salvation and exaltation.  As President Ezra Taft Benson so powerfully taught, “When used together, the Bible and the Book of Mormon confound false doctrines” (“A New Witness for Christ,” Ensign, Nov. 1984, 8). — Elder L. Tom Perry, “The Power of Deliverance,” Ensign, May 2012

To understand requires more than casual reading or perusal – there must be concentrated study. . . . Not only should we study each day, but there should be a regular time set aside when we can concentrate without interference. . . . The important thing is to allow nothing else to ever interfere with our study. . . . There are some who read to a schedule of a number of pages or a set number of chapters each day or week. . . . It is better to have a set amount of time to give scriptural study each day than to have a set amount of chapters to read.  Sometimes we find that the study of a single verse will occupy the whole time. — President Howard W. Hunter, Ensign, November 1979, pp. 64-65

Sometimes I go to the scriptures for doctrine.  Sometimes I go to the scriptures for instruction. I go with a question, and the question usually is “What would God have me do?” or “What would He have me feel?”  Invariably I find new ideas, thoughts I have never had before, and I receive inspiration and instruction and answers to my questions. — Elder Henry B. Eyring, July 2005

Those who delve into the scriptural library . . . find that to understand requires more than casual reading or perusal – there must be concentrated study.  It is certain that one who studies the scriptures every day accomplishes far more than one who devotes considerable time one day and then lets days go by before continuing.  Not only should we study each day, but there should be a regular time set aside when we can concentrate without interference.  There is nothing more helpful than prayer to open our understanding of the scriptures.  Through prayer we can attune our minds to seek the answers to our searchings. . . . Many find that the best time to study is in the morning after a night’s rest has cleared the mind of the many cares that interrupt thought.  Others prefer to study in the quiet hours after the work and worries of the day are over and brushed aside, thus ending the day with a peace and tranquility that comes by communion with the scriptures.  Perhaps what is more important than the hour of the day is that a regular time be set aside for study.  It would be ideal if an hour could be spent each day; but if that much cannot be had, a half hour on a regular basis would result in substantial accomplishment.  A quarter of an hour is little time, but it is surprising how much enlightenment and knowledge can be acquired in a subject so meaningful.  The important thing is to allow nothing else to ever interfere with our study. — President Howard W. Hunter, LDS General Conference, October 1979

This in brief is the Biblical story of John, and to every story in the scriptures there is a moral, a teaching, a doctrine – something that will guide and help those of us who read the scriptures and ponder their deep and marvelous meanings.  What we are to learn from the baptism of Jesus was expressed by Nephi in these words:  “And now, if the Lamb of God, he being holy” – and truly Christ was without sin – “should have need to be baptized by water, to fulfil all righteousness, O then, how much more need have we, being unholy” – and who among us has not sinned – “to be baptized, yea, even by water!”

Christ was not baptized for the remission of sins because he had none.  But, as Nephi recounts, he was baptized for the following reasons:  (1) As a token of humility before the Father; (2) As a covenant that he would keep the commandments; (3) As a prelude to receiving the gift of the Holy Ghost; (4) To gain entrance to and be saved in the kingdom of God, for no one, not even the Son of God, can so obtain without baptism; and (5) As a pattern and an example for all men, and so that he could say: “Follow thou me” and also, “He that is baptized in my name, to him will the Father give the Holy Ghost, like unto me; wherefore, follow me, and do the things which ye have seen me do.”  (See  2 Ne. 31:5–12.)

And finally, for us in these last days, perhaps the most wondrous thing in the life of John is that he came, in resurrected glory, to Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery, on the 15th day of May in 1829.  To them he said:  “Upon you my fellow servants, in the name of Messiah I confer the Priesthood of Aaron, which holds the keys of the ministering of angels, and of the gospel of repentance, and of baptism by immersion for the remission of sins; and this shall never be taken again from the earth, until the sons of Levi do offer again an offering unto the Lord in righteousness” (D&C 13:1).

The Lord be praised for the life and ministry of a man called John. — Elder Bruce R. McConkie, “A Man Called John,” New Era, May 1984, p. 4

We receive light from the Lord.  This can happen to us when we study the scriptures and “our eyes [are] opened and our understandings [are] enlightened”  (D&C 76:12).  Daily scripture study turns on the light of our spiritual perception and opens our understandings to further knowledge.  I try to read from the scriptures at the close of the day.  It brings a remarkable peace.  I sleep better by doing this. — President James E. Faust, “Put Light in Your Life” fireside talk given on September 8, 2006; New Era, June 2007

Elder Neal A. Maxwell of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles has said that “the scriptures not only witness the truth about Christ and his relevance for mankind, but are, in a sense, like a songbook.  There are many melodies that need to be sung and heard. . . . Only through personal involvement with the scriptures can we find the particular scriptural songs to meet our needs. . . . We must – ourselves – open the songbook and hear the music” (A Time to Choose [1972], 52).

“It is not sufficient to have a vague understanding of truth or the reality of the Father and His Son, our Savior.  Each of us must come to know who They really are.  You must feel how very much They love you.  You must trust that as you consistently live the truth the best you can, They will help you realize the purpose of your earth life and strengthen you to qualify for the blessings promised.  To be obedient to the commandments of God requires an understanding of them.  It necessitates faith in them.  That comprehension is best obtained through personal study of doctrine.”  — Elder Richard G. Scott, “Truth Restored,” Ensign, November 2005, pp. 80-81

Going to the scriptures to learn what to do makes all the difference.  The Lord can teach us.  When we come to a crisis in our life . . . we should go looking in the scriptures for specific help.  We will find answers in the scriptures.  The Lord seemed to anticipate all of our problems and all of our needs, and He put help in the scriptures for us – if only we seek it. — Elder Henry B. Eyring, “A Discussion on Scripture Study,” Ensign, July 2005

Now, my beloved brethren and sisters, let us read the Book of Mormon and be convinced that Jesus is the Christ.  Let us continually reread the Book of Mormon so that we might more fully come to Christ, be committed to Him, centered in Him, and consumed in Him.

We are meeting the adversary every day.  The challenges of this era will rival any of the past, and these challenges will increase both spiritually and temporally.  We must be close to Christ, we must daily take His name upon us, always remember Him, and keep His commandments. — President Ezra Taft Benson, General Conference, October 1987

Prior to meeting Joseph Smith, Brigham Young said he would have crawled around the earth on his hands and knees to meet someone like Moses who could tell him anything “about God and heaven.”  (In Journal of Discourses, 8:228.)  Through Joseph Smith we have additional pages from Moses about God and heaven.  We have only to reach to the bookshelf or go to priesthood meeting.  Perhaps the way is almost too easy and too simple; we might be more appreciative if on hands and knees.  (See 1 Ne. 17:41.)  Only by searching the scriptures, not using them occasionally as quote books, can we begin to understand the implications as well as the declarations of the gospel. — Elder Neal A. Maxwell, Ensign, May 1986, p. 34

The Lord said that when we read the revelations to one another, by his power we “can testify that you have heard my voice, and know my words.”  (D&C 18:35–36)

These things are the true measure of our progress.  Far more important than counting things we can see are those spiritual things we can feel.  “Search the scriptures,” the Lord has told us, “for . . . they are they which testify of me.”  (John 5:39) — President Boyd K. Packer, “The Library of the Lord,” Ensign, May 1990, p. 36

As with voices from the dust, the prophets of the Lord cry out to us on earth today: take hold of the scriptures!  Cling to them, walk by them, live by them, rejoice in them, feast on them.  Don’t nibble.  They are “the power of God unto salvation” that lead us back to our Savior Jesus Christ. . . . If you have not heard His voice speaking to you lately, return with new eyes and new ears to the scriptures.  They are our spiritual lifeline. — Elder Robert D. Hales, “Holy Scriptures: The Power of God unto Our Salvation,” Ensign, November 2006

If asked which book of scripture provides the most frequent chance to “listen” to the Lord talking, most individuals would at first think of the New Testament.  The New Testament is a marvelous collection of the deeds and many of the doctrines of the Messiah.  But in the Doctrine and Covenants we receive the voice as well as the word of the Lord.  We can almost “hear” him talking.  Words like these sink into one’s marrow as well as into one’s mind, for the majesty and power of the Lord are so evident. — Elder Neal A. Maxwell, “The Doctrine and Covenants: The Voice of the Lord,” Ensign, December 1978, p. 4

We should be reading regularly in the scriptures to form a foundation for any kind of competence in understanding and teaching the fundamental principles of life, the revealed principles of life and salvation which God himself has given us.  We read to know, to understand, to apply, to gain faith.  There is much more in the scriptures that we should speak of – the beauty, the comfort, the inspiration, the motivation, the encouragement, the enhancement of humility – that go with these fundamentals when we read with purpose, and those purposes lead us to a basis of understanding and faith on which to build our lives, and to share. — Elder Marion D. Hanks, “An Attitude – The Weightier Matters,” Ensign, July 1981, p. 67

Not only has much more scripture come to us through the Restoration, but as we all know, “many great and important things pertaining to the Kingdom of God” will yet be revealed (see A of F 1:9 ).  Among those things yet to be revealed one day will be the full book of Enoch.  We have already, in the Restoration, received 18 times more than the meager data in the Bible concerning this great and prophetic figure of Enoch.  Without the Restoration, we would not even know there was a city of Enoch!

Furthermore, one day the Bible and the Book of Mormon will be joined by the witnessing words of scripture from the lost tribes of Israel (see 2 Ne. 29:13).  There will eventually be three witnesses, and we know this, again, from the revelations in the great Restoration. — Elder Neal A. Maxwell, “The Wondrous Restoration,” Ensign, April 2003, p. 30

I stress again the deep need each woman has to study the scriptures.  We want our homes to be blessed with sister scriptorians – whether you are single or married, young or old, widowed or living in a family.

Regardless of your particular circumstances, as you become more and more familiar with the truths of the scriptures, you will be more and more effective in keeping the second great commandment, to love your neighbor as yourself.  Become scholars of the scriptures – not to put others down, but to lift them up!  After all, who has any greater need to “treasure up” the truths of the gospel (on which they may call in their moments of need) than do women and mothers who do so much nurturing and teaching? — President Spencer W. Kimball, Ensign, November 1979, p. 102

More than at any time in our history, brothers and sisters, we have need for greater spirituality.  The way to develop greater spirituality is to feast on the words of Christ as revealed in the scriptures.

One of the most significant happenings in recent Church history is the publication of the new editions of the standard works with the new footnotes and other helps.  I think we can say without exaggeration that never before in any dispensation have the Saints been so abundantly blessed with the words of the Lord and His prophets.  Now our challenge is to do as the Lord commanded:  “Study my word  which hath gone forth among the children of men” (D&C 11:22). — President Ezra Taft Benson, “Counsel to the Saints,” Ensign, May 1984, p. 6

“. . . learn of me. . . .For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.” (Matt. 11:29-30) I should like to suggest that you follow that injunction given by the Son of God.  With all of your learning, learn of him.  With all of your study, seek knowledge of the Master.  That knowledge will complement in a wonderful way the secular training you receive and give a fulness to your life and character that can come in no other way. — President Gordon B. Hinckley, Conference Report, October 1964, p. 118

Because they expound the doctrine of Christ, the scriptures are accompanied by the Holy Spirit, whose role it is to bear witness of the Father and the Son (see 3 Nephi 11:32). Therefore, being in the scriptures is one way we receive the Holy Ghost. Of course, scripture is given through the Holy Ghost in the first place (see 2 Peter 1:21; D&C 20:26–27; 68:4), and that same Spirit can attest its truth to you and me.  Study the scriptures carefully, deliberately.  Ponder and pray over them.  Scriptures are revelation, and they will bring added revelation. — Elder D. Todd Christofferson: “The Blessing of Scripture,” Ensign, May 2010, p. 35

Scripture reading may . . . lead to current revelation on whatever [subject] the Lord wishes to communicate to the reader at that time.  We do not overstate the point when we say that the scriptures can be a Urim and Thummim to assist each of us to receive personal revelation. Because we believe that scripture reading can help us receive revelation, we are encouraged to read the scriptures again and again.  By this means, we obtain access to what our Heavenly Father would have us know and do in our personal lives today.  That is one reason Latter-day Saints believe in daily scripture study. — Elder Dallin H. Oaks, Ensign, January 1995, p. 8

We may . . .  find that a specific verse of scripture that was spoken for quite a different purpose in an entirely different age will, under the interpretive influence of the Holy Ghost, give us a very personal message adapted to our personal needs today. . . . If we seek to liken the scriptures to our own circumstances, “that it might be for our profit and learning” (1 Nephi 19:23), a loving Father in heaven can use them to bless us in highly individual ways.” — Elder Dallin H. Oaks, “Studying the Scriptures,” Devotional given in the Salt Lake Tabernacle, November 24, 1985

Personal, sincere involvement in the scriptures produces faith, hope, and solutions to our daily challenges.  Frequently reading, pondering, and applying the lessons of the scriptures, combined with prayer, become an irreplaceable part of gaining and sustaining a strong, vibrant testimony. — Elder Donald L. Staheli, Ensign, November 2004, p. 37

President Benson counseled the brethren in a Church leadership meeting:  “I urge you to recommit yourselves to a study of the scriptures.  Immerse yourselves in them daily so you will have the power of the Spirit to attend you in your callings.  Read them in your families and teach your children to love and treasure them.  Then prayerfully and in counsel with others, seek every way possible to encourage the members of the Church to follow your example.” — President Ezra Taft Benson, Ensign, May 1986, pp. 81-82

For the gospel to be written in your heart, you need to know what it is and grow to understand it more fully, . . sometimes reading a few verses, stopping to ponder them, carefully reading the verses again, and as you think about what they mean, praying for understanding, asking questions in your mind, waiting for spiritual impressions, and writing down the impressions and insights that come so you can remember and learn more. Studying in this way, you may not read a lot of chapters or verses in a half hour, but you will be giving place in your heart for the word of God, and He will be speaking to you. — Elder D. Todd Christofferson, “When Thou Art Converted,” Ensign, May 2004, p. 11

Nevertheless, we are saddened to learn, as the authorities travel about the stakes and missions of the Church, that there are still many of the Saints who are not reading and pondering the scriptures regularly, and who have little knowledge of the Lord’s instructions to the children of men.  Many have been baptized and received a testimony, and have “gotten into this strait and narrow path,” yet have failed to take the further required step – to “press forward, feasting upon the word of Christ, and endure to the end.”  (2 Ne. 31:19, 20)

Only the faithful will receive the promised reward, which is eternal life.  For one cannot receive eternal life without becoming a “doer of the word” (see James 1:22) and being valiant in obedience to the Lord’s commandments.  And one cannot become a “doer of the word” without first becoming a “hearer.”  And to become a “hearer” is not simply to stand idly by and wait for chance bits of information; it is to seek out and study and pray and comprehend.  Therefore the Lord said, “Whoso receiveth not my voice is not acquainted with my voice, and is not of me.”  (D&C 84:52.) — President Spencer W. Kimball, Ensign, July 1985

The purpose of scripture or the doctrines of religion is to keep people from dwindling in unbelief and to ultimately help bring their souls into a state of cleanliness, that they may dwell with their Father in heaven in the eternities.  It is a step-by-step process. — Elder John H. Vandenberg, “To Cleanse Our Souls,” Ensign, November 1975, p. 42

“Search the scriptures,” was the command of Jesus, “for in them ye think ye have eternal life: and they are they that testify of me.”  (John 5:39)  I would not only search the scriptures that we now have, but I would search also every revelation that God has given, does give, or will give for the guidance and direction of his people, and then I would reverence the Giver, and those also whom he makes use of as his honored instruments to promulgate and make known those principles; and I would seek to be governed by the principles that are contained in that sacred word. — President John Taylor, Journal of Discourses, Vol. 16, February 1, 1874, p. 371

However diligent we may be in other areas, certain blessings are to be found only in the scriptures, only in coming to the word of the Lord and holding fast to it as we make our way through the mists of darkness to the tree of life. — President Ezra Taft Benson, Ensign, May 1986, p. 82

I fear that many of us rush about from day to day taking for granted the Holy Scriptures. We scramble to honor appointments with physicians, lawyers, and businessmen.  Yet we think nothing of postponing interviews with Deity postponing scripture study.  Little wonder we develop anemic souls and lose our direction in living. How much better it would be if we planned and held sacred fifteen or twenty minutes a day for reading the scriptures.  Such interviews with Deity would help us recognize his voice and enable us to receive guidance in all of our affairs. — Elder Carlos E. Asay, “Look to God and Live,” Ensign, November 1978, p. 52

We must engage in activities that bring spiritual power. I speak of such activities as immersing ourselves in the scriptures. There is a power that flows into our lives when we read and study the scriptures on a daily basis that cannot be found in any other way. — President Ezra Taft Benson, BYU Devotional and Fireside Speeches, pp. 53-54

As any good thing can be misused, a word of warning may be appropriate.  The scriptures don’t have the answers to every question.  Many important truths have yet to be revealed.  Preoccupation with the so-called “mysteries” should be avoided.  Beware also of private interpretation.  Look to the living prophets and official policies for interpretation. Don’t judge others whose circumstances are not yours to judge.  We are reassured, however, that they who “diligently seeketh shall find; and the mysteries of God shall be unfolded unto them, by the power of the Holy Ghost” (1 Ne. 10:19).  Keep in mind, too, that many revelations have been given in response to prophetic inquiry. — President Boyd K. Packer, “Living by Scriptural Guidance,” Ensign, November 2000, p.16

It is your privilege and duty to live so as to be able to understand the things of God.  There are the Old and New Testaments, the Book of Mormon, and the book of Doctrine and Covenants, which Joseph has given us, and they are of great worth to a person wandering in darkness.  They are like a lighthouse in the ocean, or a finger-post which points out the road we should travel.  Where do they point?  To the Fountain of Light. Discourses of Brigham Young, 127

Do you read the scriptures, my brethren and sisters, as though you were writing them a thousand, two thousand, or five thousand years ago?   Do you read them as though you stood in the place of the men who wrote them?  If you do not feel thus, it is your privilege to do so, that you may be as familiar with the spirit and meaning of the written word of God as you are with your daily walk and conversation, or as you are with your workmen or with your households. — Brigham Young, Journal of Discourses, 7:333

The people on every hand are inquiring, “What does this scripture mean, and how shall we understand this or that passage?”  Now I wish, my brethren and sisters, for us to understand things precisely as they are, and not as the flitting, changing imagination of the human mind may frame them.  The Bible is just as plain and easy of comprehension as the revelation which I have just read to you, if you understand the Spirit of God – the Spirit of Revelation, and know how the Gospel of salvation is adapted to the capacity of weak man. — Brigham Young, Journal of Discourses, 3:336

Records indicate that soon after the founding of the Church in 1830, the Prophet stopped using the seer stones as a regular means of receiving revelations.  Instead, he dictated the revelations after inquiring of the Lord without employing an external instrument.  One of his scribes explained that process: “The scribe seats himself at a desk or table, with pen, ink, and paper.  The subject of inquiry being understood, the Prophet and Revelator inquires of God.  He spiritually sees, hears, and feels, and then speaks as he is moved upon by the Holy Ghost.”  (William McLellin, ed., The Ensign of Liberty (Aug. 1849), 98) — Gerrit Dirkmaat, “Great and Marvelous are the Revelations of God,” Ensign, January 2013, p. 46

One of the unique features of the ever-expanding body of fundamental spiritual knowledge about man’s identity and purpose . . . Lost books are among the treasures yet to come forth. . . . Thus, just as there will be many more Church members, families, wards, stakes, and temples, later on, there will also be many more nourishing and inspiring scriptures.  However, we must first feast worthily upon that which we already have! — Elder Neal A. Maxwell, Conference Report, October 1986, pp. 69-70

[The latter-day scriptures are published] so that the honest in heart may be cheered and comforted and go on their way rejoicing, as their souls become exposed and their understanding enlightened by a knowledge of God’s work through the fathers in former days, as well as what He is about to do in latter days to fulfill the words of the fathers. Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Joseph Smith, p. 65

. . . we live in an age when access to the scriptures is unprecedented.  Never in the history of the world have God’s children had the opportunity to enjoy these sacred materials as they do now.  Written copies of the scriptures can be readily purchased in bookstores or online.  Electronic copies can be accessed instantaneously through the World Wide Web and downloaded to numerous devices.  Preparing talks, writing articles, and searching for information has never been easier.

God has given us this new technology for a wise purpose.  The adversary, however, has stepped up his offensive and uses technological advancements – intended by God to help us – to further his purpose of making us “miserable like unto himself” (2 Nephi 2:27). — Elder Michael John U. The, “The Power of the Word of God,” Ensign, March 2013, p. 52

I think the proper course for us to pursue is to turn to the Holy Scriptures and learn what the Lord has done for the people of His church in days of old.  The more we know about the way an unchangeable God has operated in days past, the greater surety we will have that He will repeat Himself in days present. . . . — Elder Bruce R. McConkie, New Era, July 1978, p. 5

In this day when the Bible is being down-graded by many who have mingled philosophies of the world with Bible scriptures to nullify their true meaning, how fortunate that our eternal Heavenly Father, who is always concerned about the spiritual well-being of his children, has given to us a companion book of scriptures, known as the Book of Mormon, as a defense for the truths of the Bible that were written and spoken by the prophets as the Lord directed. — President Harold B. Lee, “Plain and Precious Things,” Ensign, August 1972

Jesus then went into the wilderness; Lucifer came tempting Him.  Jesus deflected each temptation with scripture.  ‘It is written, Man shall not live by bread alone.’  ‘It is written again, Thou shalt not tempt the Lord thy God.’  ‘It is written, Thou shalt worship the Lord thy God, and him only shalt thou serve.’ Think on it carefully. When facing Perdition himself, the Lord drew upon scriptures for protection. — Elder Boyd K. Packer, General Conference, April 2000

Let us not treat lightly the great things we have received from the hand of the Lord. His word is one of the most valuable gifts He has given us. I urge you to recommit yourselves to a study of the scriptures.  Immerse yourselves in them daily so you will have the power of the Spirit to attend you in your calling.  Read them in your families and teach your children to love and treasure them.  Then prayerfully and in counsel with others, seek every way possible to encourage the members of the Church to follow your example. — President Ezra Taft Benson, “The Power of the Word,” Ensign, May 1986, pp. 79-82

Throughout the ages, Father in Heaven has inspired select men and women to find, through the guidance of the Holy Ghost, solutions to life’s most perplexing problems.  He has inspired those authorized servants to record those solutions as a type of handbook for those of His children who have faith in His plan of happiness and in His Beloved Son, Jesus Christ. We have ready access to this guidance through the treasure we call the standard works – that is, the Old and New Testaments, the Book of Mormon, the Doctrine and Covenants, and the Pearl of Great Price. 

Because scriptures are generated from inspired communication through the Holy Ghost, they are pure truth. We need not be concerned about the validity of concepts contained in the standard works since the Holy Ghost has been the instrument which has motivated and inspired those individuals who have recorded the scriptures. — Elder Richard G. Scott, Conference Report, October 2011

Pondering a passage of scripture can be a key to unlock revelation and the guidance and inspiration of the Holy Ghost.  Scriptures can calm an agitated soul, giving peace, hope, and a restoration of confidence in one’s ability to overcome the challenges of life.  They have potent power to heal emotional challenges when there is faith in the Savior.  They can accelerate physical healing. — Elder Richard G. Scott, Conference Report, October 2011