Quotes on Service

See also: Moses 1; 4:1-2; Daniel 6:26

Service is the rent we pay for living in this world. — President N. Eldon Tanner

We don’t give our testimony and lives in death in the same manner that Joseph Smith, the martyred Prophet, gave his life.  Rather, we give testimony by devoted service in our lives each day to live and to strengthen others. — Elder Robert D. Hales, address at New Mission Presidents Seminar, Church News, July 2, 1994, p. 5

We could remember [Jesus’] magnificent but virtually unknown foster father, a humble carpenter by trade who taught us, among other things, that quiet, plain, unpretentious people have moved this majestic work forward from the very beginning, and still do so today.  If you are serving almost anonymously, please know that so, too, did one of the best men who has ever lived on this earth. — Elder Jeffrey R. Holland, Ensign, November 1995, p. 68

Service is not something we endure on this earth so we can earn the right to live in the celestial kingdom. Service is the very fiber of which an exalted life in the celestial kingdom is made. — Marion G. Romney, Ensign, November 1982, p. 93

It has been said that this church does not necessarily attract great people but more often makes ordinary people great.  Many nameless people with gifts equal only to five loaves and two small fishes magnify their callings and serve without attention or recognition, feeding literally thousands. — President James E. Faust, “Five Loaves and Two Fishes,” Ensign, May 1994, p. 4

I have learned that it is by serving that we learn how to serve.  When we are engaged in the service of our fellowmen, not only do our deeds assist them, but we put our own problems in a fresher perspective.  When we concern ourselves more with others, there is less time to be concerned with ourselves.  In the midst of the miracle of serving, there is the promise of Jesus, that by losing ourselves, we find ourselves.  (Matt. 10:39)

God does notice us, and He watches over us.  But it is usually through another person that He meets our needs.  Therefore, it is vital that we serve each other in the kingdom.  The people of the Church need each other’s strength, support and leadership in a community of believers as an enclave of disciples.  In the Doctrine and Covenants we read about how important it is to “. . . succor the weak, lift the hands which hang down, and strengthen the feeble knees.”  (D&C 81:5)  So often, our acts of service consist of simple encouragement or of giving mundane help with mundane tasks, but what glorious consequences can flow from mundane acts and from small but deliberate deeds. — President Spencer W. Kimball, June 1974 General Conference; The Church News, March 7, 1992, p. 14

I believe in the principle that I can make a difference in this world.  It may be ever so small, but it will count for the greater good.  The goodness of the world in which we live is the accumulated goodness of many small and seemingly inconsequential acts. — President Gordon B. Hinckley, BYU Fireside, March 1, 1992; The Church News, March 14, 1992, p. 11

My life, like my shoes, is meant to be worn out in service. — President Spencer W. Kimball

Elder Marion D. Hanks explained:  “The Lord said, speaking of His servants, ‘Their arm shall be my arm’ [D&C 35:14].  Have you thought about this?  To me this is one of the most sacred and significant and personal commissions I can read about in the holy records or elsewhere.  The Lord says this arm of mine is His arm.  This mind, this tongue, these hands, these feet, this purse – these are the only tools He has to work with” (Service, BYU Speeches of the Year [Provo, 15 October. 1958], p. 3). Come Unto Me, Relief Society Personal Study Guide 3, 1991, p. 187

Jesus taught his followers the parable of the sheep and the goats, representing the judgment to come, in which he clearly identified those who will inherit “life eternal” and those who will “go away into everlasting punishment.”  (Matt. 25:46)  The key difference was that those who should inherit the kingdom with him had developed the habit of helping, had experienced the joy of giving, and the satisfaction of serving – they had responded to the needs of the hungry, thirsty, homeless, the naked, the sick, and those in prison.  Well known are his words, the words of comfort to them:  “Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me” (Matt. 25:40), while to those who were condemned to “everlasting punishment” he made the sad pronouncement, “Inasmuch as ye did it not to one of the least of these, ye did it not to me” (Matt. 25:45). — Elder Marion D. Hanks, Ensign, May 1992, p. 9

Helping, giving, sacrificing are, or should be, as natural as growing and breathing. — Elder Marion D. Hanks, Ensign, May 1992, p. 9

Shortly before his death Joseph Smith wrote these words:  “[We are] to feed the hungry, to clothe the naked, to provide for the widow, to dry up the tear of the orphan, to comfort the afflicted, whether in this church, or in any other, or in no church at all, wherever [we find] them.”  (Times and Seasons, 16 Mar. 1842, p. 732) — Elder Marion D. Hanks, Ensign, May 1992, p. 10

The only road to heaven is the road of service. — Elder Charles A. Callis, General Conference, April 1939

Serving others should become a natural part of the life of every follower of our Savior.  When we subordinate personal interests out of love and give of ourselves with no thought of receiving in return, we are moving toward becoming true disciples. — Elder Joseph B. Wirthlin, Ensign, May 1992, p. 87

I know sanctification comes not with any particular calling, but with genuine acts of service, often for which there is no specific calling. — Elder Neal Maxwell, Ensign, May 1985, p. 78

A striking personality and good character is achieved by practice, not merely by thinking it.  Just as a pianist masters the intricacies of music through hours and weeks of practice, so mastery of life is achieved by the ceaseless practice of mechanics which make up the art of living.  Daily unselfish service to others is one of the rudimentary mechanics of the successful life.  “For whosoever will save his life,” the Galilean said, “shall lose it, and whosoever will lose his life for my sake shall find it.” (Matthew 16:25)  What a strange paradox this!  And yet one needs only to analyze it to be convinced of its truth. . . .

Only when you lift a burden, God will lift your burden.  Divine paradox this!  The man who staggers and falls because his burden is too great can lighten that burden by taking on the weight of another’s burden.  You get by giving, but your part of giving must be given first. — President Spencer W. Kimball, “The Abundant Life,” commencement at Safford, AZ, High School, 1939; see Teachings of Spencer W. Kimball, pp. 250-51

Consider the brethren who lead us.  They administer the kingdom in the Savior’s pattern.  Not by policy and impersonal distance, as happens in human organizations that grow very large – though of course the Brethren must meet and plan.  They minister.  They attend to individuals, putting themselves out as much as it takes, welcoming the interruptions that make many leaders impatient.  I have seen it over and over.  Five times in the past year or two that I know of, one or another of these leaders has appeared at this home or that in our ward to visit and cheer a widow, a dying widower, a brother debilitated by illness.  One of the Twelve came with his wife to give a blessing to my daughter-in-law, and it was learned he had just visited someone in a hospital in Springville and was on his way to give still another blessing.  One of us expressed surprise that as an Apostle he would have time to be going about the countryside attending to the needs of individuals.  Gently he explained that his calling is to be a minister in just this way.  The telling blows against evil are struck, one act of love at a time. — C. Terry Warner, “Honest, Simple, Solid, True,” Brigham Young Magazine, June 1996, p. 38

Those whose eyes are single to God’s glory care little about receiving credit or recognition for their good deeds, said Elder Marlin K. Jensen of the Seventy at the October 1989 general conference.

“They are more interested in feeding God’s sheep than in counting them.  In fact, they frequently find their greatest happiness in serving anonymously, thereby leaving the beneficiaries of their kindness with no one to thank or praise except the Lord.” — Elder Marlin K. Jensen, Church News, June 5, 1999, p. 14

Within each of our circles of friendship there lie so many unused opportunities to love, to serve, and to be taught.  Indeed, one could apply the scriptural phrase about there being “enough and to spare” (D&C 104:17).  None of us ever fully utilizes the people-opportunities allocated to us within our circles of friendship.  You and I may call these intersectings “coincidence.”  This word is understandable for mortals to use, but coincidence is not an appropriate word to describe the workings of an omniscient God.  He does not do things by “coincidence” but instead by “divine design.” — Elder Neal A. Maxwell, “Brim with Joy,” BYU Devotional, January 23, 1996

Never, never underestimate the spiritual value of doing temporal things well for those whom you serve. — President Henry B. Eyring, “The Book of Mormon Will Change Your Life,” CES Symposium, August 17, 1990

Following baptism, a commandment-keeping member seeks to “bear one another’s burdens, . . . mourn with those that mourn, . . . and comfort those that stand in need of comfort” (Mosiah 18:8-9).   As we keep the commandments and render that kind of service, the Lord can “pour out his Spirit more abundantly upon [us]” (Mosiah 18:10; see D&C 20:77).  The reward for obedience and service is not only the gift of the Holy Ghost but also special gifts of the Spirit.  Paul defines the fruits of the Spirit as love, joy, peace, long-suffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, and meekness (see Gal. 5:22-23).  The Holy Spirit blesses us with Christlike attributes as we serve each other.

Through service to others, we develop a Christlike love and we experience joy.  Service teaches patience and long-suffering as well as gentleness, goodness, and faith. — Elder Merrill J. Bateman, “Living a Christ-Centered Life,” Ensign, January 1999, p. 10

It seems to me that the Savior is saying to each of us that unless we lose ourselves in the service of others our lives are largely lived to no real purpose….He who lives only unto himself withers and dies, while he who forgets himself in the service of others grows and blossoms in this life and in eternity. — President Gordon B. Hinckley, BYU Speeches of the Year, 1977, p. 43

Why do we serve?

Service is an imperative for those who worship Jesus Christ.  To followers who were vying for prominent positions in his kingdom, the Savior taught, “Whosoever will be chief among you, let him be your servant.”  (Matt. 20:27)  On a later occasion, he spoke of ministering to the needs of the hungry, the naked, the sick, and the imprisoned.  He concluded that teaching with these words: “Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me.”  (Matt. 25:40)

In latter-day revelation the Lord has commanded that we “succor the weak, lift up the hands which hang down, and strengthen the feeble knees.”  (D&C 81:5)  In another section of the Doctrine and Covenants, he instructed us to be :anxiously engaged in a good cause, and do many things of [our] own free will, and bring to pass much righteousness.”  (D&C 58:27)  . . . Indeed, service is a covenant obligation of all members of the Church of Jesus Christ.

Whether our service is to our fellowmen or to God, it is the same.  (See Mosiah 2:17.)  If we love him, we should keep his commandments and feed his sheep.  (See John 21:16-17.)  — Elder Dallin H. Oaks, “Why Do We Serve?” Ensign, November 1984, p. 12

When the opportunity to serve is recognized as a blessing, where thoughtfulness, courtesy, tolerance, kindness, consideration are habitual, where duties become privileges, where virtues are recognized and gratefully mentioned, where faults are minimized or overlooked, where the home is enveloped by love and hallowed by prayer, there is heaven on earth, and there eternal homes are in the making.  To foster such homes is the most effective part of your service to the Church. — President Hugh B. Brown, Continuing the Quest, p. 10

We can be of so much service to others in many thou-shalt ways.  Of course, the problem is that rendering such service takes time, and we are all so busy.  Some situations may call for service that somehow seems to be beneath us.  Besides, we have other things to do.  The “thou shalts” are so convenient to put off.  Who will notice the procrastination anyway?  After all, we are not robbing a bank.  Or are there forms of withholding that constitute stealing? . . .

How many times are we too busy to “come up and sit” with someone who needs conversation?  (See Acts 8:26-31.)  You and I have divine promptings all the time encouraging us to do good, but we often deflect them instead of doing like Philip who “ran thither”. . . .

How often do you and I also give what the scriptures call the “garment of praise” (Isaiah 61:3)?  The “garment of praise” is often more desperately needed than the physical cloak.  In any case, as we all know, these needs are all around us, every day.  There are so many ways we can “lift up the hands which hang down, and strengthen the feeble knees” (D&C 81:5). — Elder Neal A. Maxwell, “The Pathway of Discipleship,” BYU, January 4, 1998, p. 6-7

The world is in need of your help.  There are feet to steady, hands to grasp, minds to encourage, hearts to inspire, and souls to save.  The blessings of eternity await you.  Yours is the privilege to be not spectators but participants on the stage of priesthood service. — President Thomas S. Monson, “To the Rescue,” Ensign, May 2001, p. 48

President John Taylor cautioned us, “If you do not magnify your callings, God will hold you responsible for those whom you might have saved had you done your duty.”

Our task is not insurmountable.  We are on the Lord’s errand, and therefore we are entitled to the Lord’s help.  But we must try.  From the stage play Shenandoah comes the spoken line which inspires: “If we don’t try, then we don’t do; and if we don’t do, then why are we here?” — President Thomas S. Monson, “To the Rescue,” Ensign, May 2001, p. 48

After quoting Moses 1:39, President Marion G. Romney, who was a counselor in the First Presidency, said: “Hence, we see the complete unselfishness of our Father in Heaven.  His whole work and glory is to bring eternal life and happiness to his children.  Should not our whole purpose in this life, therefore, be made up of righteous service one to another?  If not, how can we ever hope to be as he is?”  (Conference Report, October. 1981, p. 132; or Ensign, Nov. 1981, p. 93) The Pearl of Great Price Student Manual, p. 6

Most people do not have the opportunity to demonstrate unselfishness in dramatic ways, but for each of us, unselfishness can mean being the right person at the right time in the right place to render service.  Almost every day brings opportunities to perform unselfish acts for others.  Such acts are unlimited and can be as simple as a kind word, a helping hand or a gracious smile. — President James E. Faust, General Conference, October 6, 2002

The service which builds a young, growing Church is not casually requested nor whimsically given.  On occasion the obstacles have been great and the price sometimes very dear.  And we speak not only of those early brethren who went out to serve, but the women who supported them – and in addition supported themselves and their children, staying at home to raise and protect families, that other portion of the Lord’s vineyard about which He is so emphatic. — Elder Jeffrey R. Holland, “Called to Serve,” Ensign, November 2002, p. 36

We need to remember the purpose of our service to one another.  If it were only to accomplish some part of His work, God could dispatch “legions of angels.” . . . But that would not achieve the purpose of the service He has prescribed.  We serve God and our fellowmen in order to become the kind of children who can return to live with our heavenly parents. — Dallin H. Oaks, “I’ll Go Where You Want Me to Go,” Ensign, November 2002, p. 70

Generally speaking, the most miserable people I know are those who are obsessed with themselves; the happiest people I know are those who lose themselves in the service of others. . . . By and large, I have come to see that if we complain about life, it is because we are thinking only of ourselves.

For many years there was a sign on the wall of a shoe repair shop I patronized.  It read, “I complained because I had no shoes until I saw a man who had no feet.”  The most effective medicine for the sickness of self-pity is to lose ourselves in the service of others. — President Gordon B. Hinckley, “Whosoever Will Save His Life,” Ensign, August 1982, p. 5

Hence, we see the complete unselfishness of our Father in Heaven.  His whole work and glory is to bring eternal life and happiness to his children.  (Moses 1:39)  Should not our whole purpose in this life, therefore, be made up of righteous service one to another?  If not, how can we ever hope to be as he is? — President Marion G. Romney, Ensign, November 1981, p. 93

The temptation to seek personal recognition and reward from our service to others is ever-present.  The pattern was established in the pre-earth life by Satan himself.  There, when the Father explained His plan of salvation for the inhabitants of this earth and the need for a redeemer, Satan responded by saying, “Behold, here am I, send me, I will be thy son, and I will redeem all mankind, that one soul shall not be lost, and surely I will do it; wherefore give me thine honor” (Moses 4:1).  In contrast, Christ showed us for all time that God’s work is to be done with an attitude of Thine, not mine.  Said He: “Father, thy will be done, and the glory be thine forever” (Moses 4:2). — Elder Marlin K. Jensen, Ensign, November 1989, p. 27

We become more significant individuals as we serve others.  We become more substantive as we serve others – indeed, it is easier to “find” ourselves because there is so much more of us to find! Teachings of Presidents of the Church, Spencer W. Kimball, “Selfless Service,” p. 85

Nothing would seem more clear than the high premium the Savior put upon selfless service to others as an indispensable element of Christian conduct and of salvation.  Helping, giving, sacrificing are, or should be, as natural as growing and breathing. — Elder Marion D. Hanks, “The Royal Law,” Ensign, May 1992, p. 9

President Thomas S. Monson has said:  “To find real happiness, we must seek for it in a focus outside ourselves.  No one has learned the meaning of living until he has surrendered his ego to the service of his fellow man.  Service to others is akin to duty – the fulfillment of which brings true joy.” — Elder Russell M. Nelson, “Celestial Marriage,” Ensign, November 2008, p. 94

Without discussing wealth and fame, shall we not call a halt in this pleasure craze, and go about the legitimate business of true Latter-day Saints, which is to desire and strive to be of some use in the world?  Shall we not instead do something to increase the genuine joy and welfare and virtue of mankind as well as our own by helping to hear the burdens under which the toilers are groaning, by rendering loving, devoted and unselfish service to our fellow men?  — President Joseph F. Smith, Gospel Doctrine, p. 324; Improvement Era, Vol. 12, July, 1909, p. 744

Our Savior teaches us to follow Him by making the sacrifices necessary to lose ourselves in unselfish service to others.  If we do, He promises us eternal life, “the greatest of all the gifts of God” (D&C 14:7), the glory and joy of living in the presence of God the Father and His Son, Jesus Christ. — Elder Dallin H. Oaks, “Unselfish Service, Ensign, May 2009

I extol you who, with loving care and compassionate concern, feed the hungry, clothe the naked, and house the homeless.  He who notes the sparrow’s fall will not be unmindful of such service.  The desire to lift, the willingness to help, and the graciousness to give come from a heart filled with love.  Serve willingly. — President Thomas S. Monson, “Three Goals to Guide You,” Liahona, November 2007, 118-21

. . . I found that while I was sincerely serving others, God forged my personal character.  He engendered a growing capacity to recognize the direction of the Spirit.  The genius of the gospel plan is that by doing those things the Lord counsels us to do, we are given every understanding and every capacity necessary to provide peace and rich fulfillment in this life.  Likewise, we gain the preparation necessary for eternal happiness in the presence of the Lord. — Elder Richard G. Scott, “The Transforming Power of Faith and Character,” Ensign, November 2010, pp. 43-46

“During your life you may achieve wealth or fame or social standing,” he said.  “Real success, however, comes from helping others.” All will have opportunities to serve.

“The blind and the handicapped need friendship; the aged are hungry for companionship; the young need understanding guidance; the gifted are starved for encouragement. These benefits can’t be conferred by reaching for your checkbook. Personal service is direct and human.”

President Monson added that one’s personal service may not be dramatic, but it can bolster human spirits, clothe cold bodies, feed hungry people, comfort grieving hearts and lift precious souls to new heights.

“My young friends, your life will be fuller, richer and happier if you seek for and find opportunities to be of service.”  — “President Monson delivers Dixie Commencement Address,” Church News, May 14, 2011, p. 3

President Spencer W. Kimball said: “It is vital that we serve each other in the kingdom. … So often, our acts of service consist of simple encouragement or of giving . . . help with mundane tasks, but what glorious consequences can flow . . . from small but deliberate deeds!” (Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Spencer W. Kimball  [2006], 82).

And President Thomas S. Monson has counseled:

“The needs of others are ever present, and each of us can do something to help someone.

“. . . Unless we lose ourselves in service to others, there is little purpose to our own lives” (“What Have I Done for Someone Today?” Liahona and Ensign, Nov. 2009, 85).

Brothers and sisters, may I reemphasize that the most important attribute of Heavenly Father and of His Beloved Son that we should desire and seek to possess within our lives is the gift of charity, “the pure love of Christ” (Moroni 7:47).  From this gift springs our capacity to love and to serve others as the Savior did. — Elder M. Russell Ballard, “Finding Joy through Loving Service,” Ensign, May 2011, pp. 48-49

Great things are wrought through simple and small things. Like the small flecks of gold that accumulate over time into a large treasure, our small and simple acts of kindness and service will accumulate into a life filled with love for Heavenly Father, devotion to the work of the Lord Jesus Christ, and a sense of peace and joy each time we reach out to one another. — Elder M. Russell Ballard, “Finding Joy through Loving Service,” Ensign, May 2011, p. 49

The treasures that we will find when we go to the other side will be those that we have laid up there by ministering to our Father’s other sons and daughters with whom we have associated here.  He has made this possible for all of us, and during our stay here we will be happier serving our fellows than we could possibly be in any other way.  (In Deseret News, May 26, 1945, Church section, 6) Teachings of Presidents of the Church, George Albert Smith, Ch. 7, “The Immortality of the Soul”

If performed in the right spirit, there is no higher worship than the unpurchased service to another soul of whatever faith, belief, or social stratum.  The Savior of the world said it simply, “Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me” (Matt. 25:40). — President James E. Faust, Ensign, June 1998, p. 5

When the Savior came upon the earth he had two great missions; one was to work out the Messiahship, the atonement for the fall, and the fulfilment of the law; the other was the work which he did among his brethren and sisters in the flesh by way of relieving their sufferings. . . . He left as a heritage to those who should come after him in his Church the carrying on of those two great things – work for the relief of the ills and the sufferings of humanity, and the teaching of the spiritual truths which should bring us back into the presence of our Heavenly Father. — President J. Reuben Clark, Jr., Conference Report, April 1937, p. 22

The more we obey God, the more we desire to help others.  The more we help others, the more we love God and on and on. Conversely, the more we disobey God and the more selfish we are, the less love we feel.

Trying to find lasting love without obeying God is like trying to quench thirst by drinking from an empty cup – you can go through the motions, but the thirst remains. Similarly, trying to find love without helping and sacrificing for others is like trying to live without eating – it is against the laws of nature and cannot succeed.  We cannot fake love. It must become part of us.” — Elder John H. Groberg, “The Power of God’s Love,” Ensign, November 2004, p. 9

At the heart of the message of the Savior of the world is a single, glorious, wonderful, still largely untried concept.  In its simplest terms the message is that we should seek to overcome the selfishness we all seem to be born with, that we should overcome human nature and think of others before self.  We should think of God and serve Him, and think of others and serve them. — President James E. Faust, “A Pattern of Love,” Ensign, December 1999

If we are to remember Jesus we must also follow him.  He cited several specific ways by which we demonstrate our remembrance of the Savior:  He calls us to take time from our daily activities to follow him and serve our fellowman.  Even the greatest among us should be the servant of all.  Those who always remember him will straightway assume and faithfully fulfill the responsibilities to which they are called by his servants. . . . If we always remember our Savior, we will forgive and forget grievances against those who have wronged us. . . .  As we always remember him, we should strive to assure that we and our family members and, indeed, all the sons and daughters of God everywhere follow our Savior into the waters of baptism.  This reminds each of us of our duties to proclaim the gospel, perfect the Saints, and redeem the dead. . . .  We should always remember how the Savior taught us to love and do good to one another.  Loving and serving one another can solve so many problems! — Elder Dallin H. Oaks, Ensign, May 1988, pp. 30-31

For those who are discouraged by their circumstances and are therefore tempted to feel they cannot serve the Lord this day, I make you two promises.  Hard as things seem today, they will be better in the next day if you choose to serve the Lord this day with your whole heart.  Your circumstances may not be improved in all the ways which you desire. But you will have been given new strength to carry your burdens and new confidence that when your burdens become too heavy, the Lord, whom you have served, will carry what you cannot.  He knows how.  He prepared long ago.  He suffered your infirmities and your sorrows when He was in the flesh so that He would know how to succor you. — Elder Henry B. Eyring, “This Day,” Ensign, May 2007, pp. 89-91

It is indeed remarkable that the nature of our dealings with our fellowmen will determine, in large measure, our status in the kingdom of heaven. . . . We may attend to rites and rituals and yet overlook the weightier matters such as brotherly kindness, honesty, mercy, virtue, and integrity.  Let us never forget that if we omit them from our lives we may be found unworthy to come into His presence. — Elder Mark E. Petersen, “Do Unto Others,” Ensign, May 1977, p. 73

Can we see how critical self-reliance becomes when looked upon as the prerequisite to service, when we all know service is what Godhood is all about?  Without self-reliance one cannot exercise these inane desires to serve.  How can we give if there is nothing there?  Food for the hungry cannot come from empty shelves.  Money to assist the needy cannot come from an empty purse.  Support and understanding cannot come from the emotionally starved.  Teaching cannot come from the unlearned.  And most important of all, spiritual guidance cannot come from the spiritually weak. — President Gordon B. Hinckley, Ensign, July 1984

Service to others deepens and sweetens this life while we are preparing to live in a better world.  It is by serving that we learn how to serve.   When we are engaged in the service of our fellowmen, not only do our deeds assist them, but we put our own problems in a fresher perspective.  When we concern ourselves more with others, there is less time to be concerned with ourselves!  In the midst of the miracle of serving, there is the promise of Jesus that by losing ourselves, we find ourselves!  Not only do we “find” ourselves in terms of acknowledging divine guidance in our lives, but the more we serve our fellowmen in appropriate ways, the more substance there is to our souls.  We become more significant individuals as we serve others.  We become more substantive as we serve others – indeed, it is easier to “find” ourselves because there is so much more of us to find! — President Spencer W. Kimball. “The Abundant Life,” Ensign, July 1978, p. 3

Our eternal happiness will be in proportion to the way that we devote ourselves to helping others. — President George Albert Smith, Conference Report, October 1936, p. 71

Service in this Church is a marvelous blessing and privilege that brings light to our eyes and our countenances.  As the Savior recommended, “Let your light so shine before this people, that they may see your good works and glorify your Father who is in heaven.” Words cannot express the blessings that come to us through service in this Church.  The Lord promises that if we magnify our callings we will find happiness and joy.

Alma asks if we have received His image in our countenances.  A sacred light comes to our eyes and countenances when we have a personal bond with our loving Heavenly Father and His Son, our Savior and Redeemer.  With this bond our faces will mirror that “sublime assurance” that He lives. — President James E Faust, “The Light in Their Eyes,” General Conference, October 2005

The people around us need a lot of help, and I think the Lord expects us to join in that effort.  I think that is what he meant when he said, “Come; see what I do and watch how I spend my time.” . . .

On the example of the Savior himself and his call to his apostles, and with the need for peace and comfort ringing in our ears, I ask you to be a healer, be a helper, be someone who joins in the work of Christ in lifting burdens, in making the load lighter, in making things better. . . . Someone sitting within reasonable proximity to you tonight is carrying a spiritual or physical or emotional burden of some sort or some other affliction drawn from life’s catalog of a thousand kinds of sorrow.  In the spirit of Christ’s first invitation to Philip and Andrew and then to Peter and the whole of his twelve apostles, jump into this work.  Help people.  Heal old wounds and try to make things better. — Elder Jeffrey R. Holland, “Come unto Me,” BYU fireside address, March 2, 1997

One of the most important things we do through the gospel of Jesus Christ is to build people.  Properly serving others requires effort to understand them as individuals – their personalities, their strengths, their concerns, their hopes and dreams – so that the correct help and support can be provided.  Frankly, it’s much easier to just manage programs than it is to understand and truly serve people.  The primary purpose of Church leadership meetings should be to discuss how to minister to people. . . . Our goal should always be to use the programs of the Church as a means to lift, encourage, assist, teach, love, and perfect people. — Elder M. Russell Ballard, “O Be Wise,” Ensign, November 2006, p. 18

Now, some of you may be shy by nature, perhaps feeling yourselves inadequate to respond affirmatively to a calling.  Remember that this work is not yours and mine alone. It is the Lord’s work, and when we are on the Lord’s errand, brethren, we are entitled to the Lord’s help.  Remember that the Lord will shape the back to bear the burden placed upon it. — President Thomas S. Monson, “The Sacred Call of Service,” Ensign, May 2005, p. 56

Money alone does not lift the burdens of our fellowmen, and many of us live in a time and place where there is little to spare.  The world is in need of time, and if we have but one hour to spare, we are wealthy.  It takes time to listen and to comfort, it takes time to teach and to encourage, and it takes time to feed and to clothe.  We all have the gift to lift each other’s burdens and to make a difference in somebody’s life.

The needy are all around us.  Too often, however, we are blind to those needs or fear those people whose company makes us feel uncomfortable.  Yes, we admire people and organizations for the numerous services they render; and yes, we rejoice in the tremendous social changes many countries experienced during the last few months.  But our admiration and interest are not enough.  People at home and abroad need our help. Let us decide to serve now, even if that means leaving the comfort of our homes temporarily. — Elder Hans B. Ringger, “Choose You This Day,” Ensign, May 1990, p. 25

The Bible teaches us that “God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son” (John 3:16).  The Doctrine and Covenants teaches that “Jesus Christ your Redeemer  . . . so loved the world that he gave his own life” (D&C 34:1, 3).

            God so loved that he gave.

            Christ so loved that he gave.

We are here on this earth to learn to love enough to give – to use our agency unselfishly.  So we are speaking of choosing a course of sharing, of giving, of graciousness, of kindness, not as optional elements of the gospel, but the heart of it.  Jesus said, “Behold I am the light which ye shall hold up – that which ye have seen me do” (3 Ne. 18:24).  What really matters, after all, is what kind of people we are.  That is what we daily, hourly, decide and demonstrate. — Elder Marion D. Hanks, General Conference, October 1990

It is only when we learn to serve for the sake of service and to do good in order to bless the lives of others that we begin to know the inner peace and satisfaction that come from caring for others.  Then we are not concerned about whether our service shows on the reports, or whether we qualify for badges and ribbons and medals of recognition.  The sweetness that comes into our lives when we learn to give for the sake of giving is far more precious than all of the public attention that we might otherwise receive.  Most importantly, when we learn to serve with no thought of reward or recognition for ourselves, we begin to develop one of the most desirable traits that the Savior himself possesses.  We draw closer to him.

I encourage you to think about this principle and to explore ways that you can begin to develop the joy of service in your own life.  In the final outcome of things, it will probably be one of the most rewarding things you can do. — Elder Dean L. Larsen, “They Have Their Reward,” New Era, May 1989, p. 4

Brothers and sisters, you will never be happy if you go through life thinking only of yourself. Get lost in the best cause in the world – the cause of the Lord.  The work of the quorums, and of the auxiliary organizations, temple work, welfare service work, missionary work.  You will bless your own life as you bless the lives of others. — President Gordon B. Hinckley, Ensign, January 1994, p. 2

Referring to the suffering of the Martin and Willie handcart companies, President Hinckley said:  “I am grateful that those days of pioneering are behind us.  I am thankful that we do not have brethren and sisters stranded in the snow, freezing & dying, while trying to get to this, their Zion in the mountains.  But there are people, not a few, whose circumstances are desperate and who cry out for help and relief.

There are so many who are hungry and destitute across this world who need help. . . . Ours is a great and solemn duty to reach out and help them, to lift them, to feed them if they are hungry, to nurture their spirits if they thirst for truth and righteousness.

There are so many young people who wander aimlessly and walk the tragic train of drugs, gangs, immorality, and the whole brood of ills that accompany these things.  There are widows who long for friendly voices and that spirit of anxious concerns which speaks of love.  There are those who were once warm in the faith, but whose faith has grown cold. Many of them wish to come back but do not know quite how to do it.  They need friendly hands reaching out to them.  With a little effort, many of them can be brought back to the feast again at the table of the Lord. 

My brethren and sisters, I would hope, I would pray that each of us . . . would resolve to seek those who need help, who are in desperate and difficult circumstances, and lift them in the spirit of love into the embrace of the Church, where strong hands and loving hearts will warm them, comfort them, sustain them, and put them on the way of happy and productive lives. — President Gordon B Hinckley, Ensign, November 1996, p. 86

When spiritually aligned, a poise can come, even when we do not know “the meaning of all things.”  (1 Ne. 11:17)  Such contented assurance  produces not arrogance but quiet acceptance, which is its own form of being “anxiously engaged” but without all the bells and whistles (D&C 58:27; see also D&C 58:28).

However, this spiritual contentment rests on our accepting the  Atonement of Jesus, because we “have come to a knowledge of the  goodness of God, and his matchless power, and his wisdom, and his  patience, and his long-suffering towards the children of men; and  also, the atonement which has been prepared from the foundation of the world” (Mosiah 4:6).

Again, brothers and sisters, seeing Alma move from wanting to be a “trump” to being a humble “instrument” and from wanting to “shake the earth”  to “perhaps [bringing] some soul to repentance” is a stunning transition!  (See Alma 29:1.)

Furthermore, isn’t it wonderful that we are permitted to grow, whether  that growth is expressed in the space of nine verses or in a lifetime? — Elder Neal A. Maxwell, “Content with the Things Allotted unto Us,” Ensign, May 2000, p. 72

My brothers and sisters, we are surrounded by those in need of our attention, our encouragement, our support, our comfort, our kindness – be they family members, friends, acquaintances, or strangers.  We are the Lord’s hands here upon the earth, with the mandate to serve and to lift His children.  He is dependent upon each of us. . . . Find someone who is having a hard time or ill or lonely, and do something for him or her. — President Thomas S. Monson, “What Have I Done for Someone Today?” Ensign, November, 2009, pp. 84-87

This gospel we have received is one of sacrifice, service and self-abnegation from beginning to end.  That is what constitutes the straight and narrow way that leads to life eternal.  Some of us are more faithful, some are less faithful than others in our sacrifices. My brethren and sisters, there will come a time of accounting, and we will he judged and rewarded according to the sacrifices which we make, and the services we render to God and to our fellowmen.  Let me tell you here that when we undertake to glorify our Father in heaven by living a good life, we help others along the way.  Religion, true religion of the Master, is so different from politics.  When we aspire to an office as politicians, and become candidates, our only hope of success is in the defeat and disappointment of somebody else.  In this great work, if I, through the help of the Lord, shall be successful in saving my own soul, it will be through works of righteousness, through a good example which will be helpful, and no person will be deprived of the blessings he is laboring for because of my success, but just the reverse, he will be helped along the way.  Now in this work of sacrifice and of service, we need encouragement, and stimulation. — Elder George F. Richards, General Conference, October 1920

I believe the Savior is telling us that unless we lose ourselves in service to others, there is little purpose to our own lives.  Those who live only for themselves eventually shrivel up and figuratively lose their lives, while those who lose themselves in service to others grow and flourish – and in effect save their lives. — President Thomas S. Monson, Ensign, November 2009, pp. 84-87

Opportunities to serve may not always seem obvious, as it is human nature to worry about our own wants and needs. We must resist such tendencies and look for opportunities to serve.  When we visit with those who are suffering from sickness, loss of loved ones, or other heartbreak, it is not enough to simply say, “Call if there is anything I can do.”  Rather, look for ways to bless the lives of others through seemingly simple acts of service.  It is better to do even things of little consequence than to do nothing at all. — Elder Steven E. Snow, “Service,” Ensign, October 2007

Jesus taught his followers the parable of the sheep and the goats, representing the judgment to come, in which he clearly identified those who will inherit “life eternal” and those who will “go away into everlasting punishment” (Matthew 25:46).  The key difference was that those who should inherit the kingdom with him had developed the habit of helping, had experienced the joy of giving and the satisfaction of serving.  They had responded to the needs of the hungry, thirsty, homeless, the naked, the sick, and those in prison. . . . Nothing would seem more clear than the high premium the Savior put upon selfless service to others as an indispensable element of Christian conduct and of salvation. Helping, giving, sacrificing are, or should be, as natural as growing and breathing. — Elder Marion D. Hanks, Ensign, May 1992, p. 9

Christ knows how to minister to others perfectly.  When the Savior stretches out His hands, those He touches are uplifted and become greater, stronger, and better people as a result.  If we are His hands, should we not do the same? — President Dieter F. Uchtdorf, “You Are My Hands,” Ensign, May 2010, p. 70

The man who does only those things in the Church which concern himself alone will never reach exaltation.  For instance, the man who is willing to pray, to pay his tithes and offerings, and to attend to the ordinary duties which concern his own personal life, and nothing more, will never reach the goal of perfection. 

Service must be given in behalf of others.  We must extend the helping hand to the unfortunate, to those who have not heard the truth and are in spiritual darkness, to the needy, the oppressed. — President Joseph Fielding Smith, Conference Report, April 1968, p. 12

Service is not something we endure on this earth so we can earn the right to live in the celestial kingdom.  Service is the very fiber of which an exalted life in the celestial kingdom is made. — President Marion G Romney, Conference Report, October 1982, p. 135

Along your pathway of life you will observe that you are not the only traveler.  There are others who need your help. There are feet to steady, hands to grasp, minds to encourage, hearts to inspire, and souls to save. — President Thomas S. Monson, “How Firm a Foundation,” Ensign, November 2006, p. 68

Always be willing, even anxious, to help others.  Nothing else you do will give you the same genuine satisfaction and joy within because, and I quote, “when ye are in the service of your fellow beings ye are only in the service of your God” (Mosiah 2:17).  Ignoring the needs of others is a serious sin. — Elder Joseph B. Wirthlin, “Running Your Marathon,” General Conference, October 1989

As I come to you at the closing moments of this conference, I would like to take you back now to just one incident, and I am sorry that I can tell you only a part of it because of the limitations of some things contained therein. 

It was just before the dedication of the Los Angeles Temple.  We were all preparing for that great occasion.  It was something new in my life, when along about three or four o’clock in the morning, I enjoyed an experience that I think was not a dream, but it must have been a vision.  It seemed that I was witnessing a great spiritual gathering, where men and women were standing up, two or three at a time, and speaking in tongues.  The spirit was so unusual.  I seemed to have heard the voice of President David O. McKay say, “If you want to love God, you have to learn to love and serve the people.  That is the way you show your love for God.” — President Harold B. Lee, “Stand Ye in Holy Places,” Ensign, July 1973, p. 121

As we move toward the future, we must not neglect the lessons of the past.  Our Heavenly Father gave His Son.  The Son of God gave His life.  We are asked by Them to give our lives, as it were, in Their divine service.  Will you?  Will I?  Will we?  There are lessons to be taught, there are kind deeds to be done, there are souls to be saved. — President Thomas S. Monson, “Becoming Our Best Selves,” Ensign, November 1999, p. 18

Let me emphasize that the noblest aim in life is to strive to live to make lives better and happier. The most worthy calling in life is that in which man can serve best his fellowman. — President David O. McKay, Conference Report, April 1961, p. 131

No, the Lord doesn’t really need us to take care of the poor, but we need this experience; for it is only through our learning how to take care of each other that we develop within us the Christlike love and disposition necessary to qualify us to return to his presence. — President Marion G. Romney, “Living Welfare Principles,” General Conference, October 1981

Let us . . . look around us in our neighborhood – not leave it to the Bishop and the Relief Society, but let each of us be ministers of loving kindness to those who will need us so much.  And whatever we do let us not make those who require assistance feel like paupers.  Let us give what we give as though it belonged to them.  God has loaned it to us. Sometimes we who have accumulated means [act] as though we think it belongs to us. Everything that we have, our food, our clothing, our shelter, our homes and our opportunities are all given to us as stewards in the Church and kingdom of our Heavenly Father, and if we will . . . impart of our substance even though it may be but the widow’s mite, we will obtain from him who lives on high the blessings we need in our day here upon the earth, and when the time comes for us to go hence we will find awaiting us the blessing of a loving Father who has appreciated the efforts we have put forth. — Teachings of Presidents of the Church: George Albert Smith

Those who grieve frequently find themselves alone.  Missed is the laughter of children, the commotion of teenagers, and the tender, loving concern of a departed companion.  The clock ticks more loudly, time passes more slowly, and four walls can indeed a prison make.  I extol those who, with loving care and compassionate concern, feed the hungry, clothe the naked, and house the homeless.  He who notes the sparrow’s fall will not be unmindful of such service. — President Gordon B. Hinckley

The more we obey God, the more we desire to help others.  The more we help others, the more we love God and on and on.  Conversely, the more we disobey God and the more selfish we are, the less love we feel.

Trying to find lasting love without obeying God is like trying to quench thirst by drinking from an empty cup – you can go through the motions, but the thirst remains. Similarly, trying to find love without helping and sacrificing for others is like trying to live without eating – it is against the laws of nature and cannot succeed.  We cannot fake love. It must become part of us. — Elder John H. Groberg, “The Power of God’s Love,” Ensign, November 2004, p. 9

If you feel that Heavenly Father is not listening to your petitions, ask yourself if you are listening to the cries of the poor, the sick, the hungry, and the afflicted all around you. — Elder Joseph B. Wirthlin, “The Law of the Fast,” Ensign, May 2001, p. 73

Generally speaking, the most miserable people I know are those obsessed with themselves; the happiest people I know are those who lose themselves in the service of others. . . . Well, in conclusion I just want to say to you who are here tonight, forget yourselves and reach out.  Occasionally, put in the background your own personal, selfish interests.  Reach out in service to others.  In so doing, you will find the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. — President Gordon B. Hinckley, “Forget Yourself,” BYU Devotional, March 6, 1977

Since patience is one of the traits of a saint (see Mosiah 3:19), it should not surprise us that we must sometimes learn patience not only by physical suffering, but also by sometimes having something to offer which, for one reason or another, we are prevented from offering, at least on the terms we would like to make the contribution.  To trust God enough to accept the reality that he knows perfectly both what we have to offer and what we desire is a special form of trust.  After all, when we sing in the hymn, “I’ll go where you want me to go, dear Lord” (Hymns, no. 75), presumably our pledge includes a willingness to stay right where we are, if that is where the Lord wants us. 

Sometimes when we think we see what is needed (and feel that we can offer just what is needed), we must still surrender to the sublime wisdom of our Heavenly Father, who “knoweth all things.”  (1 Jn. 3:20)  Sometimes we are tested, therefore, not only by the requirement that we place certain things on the altar of sacrifice and service, but also by the trial of circumstances that seem to prevent us from placing a portion of self on the altar. — Elder Neal A. Maxwell, Ensign, July 1975

The more we obey God, the more we desire to help others.  The more we help others, the more we love God and on and on.  Conversely, the more we disobey God and the more selfish we are, the less love we feel.

Trying to find lasting love without obeying God is like trying to quench thirst by drinking from an empty cup – you can go through the motions, but the thirst remains. Similarly, trying to find love without helping and sacrificing for others is like trying to live without eating – it is against the laws of nature and cannot succeed.  We cannot fake love. It must become part of us. — Elder John H. Groberg, Ensign, November 2004, p. 9

Many people imagine that charity is giving a dollar to somebody; but real, genuine charity is giving love and sympathy, and that is the kind of charity that the apostle had reference to in this 13th chapter of First Corinthians. Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Heber J. Grant, p. 153

“If ye love me, keep my commandments,” (John 14:15) Jesus said.  So we have neighbors to bless, children to protect, the poor to lift up, and the truth to defend.  We have wrongs to make right, truths to share, and good to do.  In short, we have a life of devoted discipleship to give in demonstrating our love of the Lord.  We can’t quit and we can’t go back.  After an encounter with the living Son of the living God, nothing is ever again to be as it was before.  The Crucifixion, Atonement, and Resurrection of Jesus Christ mark the beginning of a Christian life, not the end of it.  It was this truth, this reality, that allowed a handful of Galilean fishermen-turned-again-Apostles without “a single synagogue or sword” to leave those nets a second time and go on to shape the history of the world in which we now live. — Elder Jeffrey R. Holland, “The First Great Commandment,” Ensign, November 2012, pp. 84-85

We each have a covenant responsibility to be sensitive to the needs of others and serve as the Savior did – to reach out, bless, and uplift those around us.  Often, the answer to our prayer does not come while we’re on our knees but while we’re on our feet serving the Lord and serving those around us.  Selfless acts of service and consecration refine our spirits, remove the scales from our spiritual eyes, and open the windows of heaven.  By becoming the answer to someone’s prayer, we often find the answer to our own. — President Dieter F. Uchtdorf, General Conference, April 2011

Eliza R. Snow, second Relief Society general president, gratefully acknowledged the efforts of sisters in Ogden, Utah, USA, to strengthen one another.  “I am well aware that a great deal is donated [in terms of service] that never reaches the [record] books,” she said.  But recognizing that a heavenly record is kept of the sisters’ work as they reach out to those whose hearts have grown cold, she said:  “President Joseph Smith said this society was organized to save souls. . . . Another book is kept of your faith, your kindness, your good works, and words. . . . Nothing is lost.”  ( Eliza R. Snow, in Daughters in My Kingdom, 83.) — “Activation,” Ensign, March 2013, p. 7

Salvation is an eternal goal we gain by a process of constant upward change.  Doubt is spiritual poison that stunts eternal growth.  We must first feel our way before we can see it with any clarity.  We prove ourselves by making numerous correct decisions without being absolutely sure; then comes a greater knowledge and assurance, not before. Happiness is created.  Love is its center.  Its principal ingredients are sincere faith, true repentance, full obedience, and selfless service. — Elder Richard G. Scott, Ensign, November 1979, p. 70

Let me emphasize that the noblest aim in life is to strive to live to make lives better and happier.  The most worthy calling in life is that in which man can serve best his fellowman. — President David O. McKay, Conference Report, April 1961

We have been sent into the world to do good to others; and in doing good to others we do good to ourselves.  We should always keep this in view, the husband in reference to his wife, the wife in reference to her husband, the children in reference to their parents, and the parents in reference to their children.  There is always opportunity to do good to one another. Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Lorenzo Snow, p. 259

With all your differences in personal circumstances and past experiences, I can tell you something of what lies ahead for you.  As you keep the faith, you will find yourself invited by the Lord often to serve someone in need when it will not seem convenient.  It may appear to be an unpleasant and perhaps even impossible task.  When the call comes, it may seem you are not needed or that someone else could easily give the succor.  Remember that when the Lord lets us encounter someone in distress, we honor the good Samaritan for what he did not do as much as for what he did.  He did not pass by on the other side even though the beaten traveler on the road was a stranger and perhaps an enemy.  He did what he could for the beaten man and then put in place a specific plan for others to do more.  He did that because he understood that helping may require more than what one person can do. Lessons in that story can guide you in whatever your future holds. — President Henry B. Eyring, October 2012 General Relief Society Meeting

I have personally verified that concepts like faith, prayer, love, and humility hold no great significance and produce no miracles until they become a living part of us through our own experience, aided by the sweet prompting of the Holy Spirit.  In early life I found that I could learn gospel teachings intellectually and, through the power of reason and analysis, recognize that they were of significant value.  But their enormous power and ability to stretch me beyond the limits of my imagination and capacity did not become reality until patient, consistent practice allowed the Holy Spirit to distill and expand their meaning in my heart.  I found that while I was sincerely serving others, God forged my personal character.  He engendered a growing capacity to recognize the direction of the Spirit.  The genius of the gospel plan is that by doing those things the Lord counsels us to do, we are given every understanding and every capacity necessary to provide peace and rich fulfillment in this life. Likewise, we gain the preparation necessary for eternal happiness in the presence of the Lord. — Elder Richard G. Scott, October 2010 General Conference

We believe that these severe, natural calamities are visited upon men by the Lord for the good of his children, to quicken their devotion to others, and to bring out their better natures, that they may love and serve him.  We believe, further, that they are the heralds and tokens of his final judgment, and the schoolmasters to teach the people to prepare themselves by righteous living for the coming of the Savior to reign upon the earth, when every knee shall bow and every tongue confess that Jesus is the Christ. Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Joseph F. Smith, p. 393

Can we see how critical self-reliance becomes when looked upon as the prerequisite to service, when we all know service is what Godhood is all about?  Without self-reliance one cannot exercise these inane desires to serve.  How can we give if there is nothing there?  Food for the hungry cannot come from empty shelves.  Money to assist the needy cannot come from an empty purse.  Support and understanding cannot come from the emotionally starved.  Teaching cannot come from the unlearned.  And most important of all, spiritual guidance cannot come from the spiritually weak. — President Gordon B. Hinckley, Ensign, July 1984

 A little red hen had a bag of wheat, and she decided to plant the wheat.  That is a very good idea because wheat is worth more for planting than for any other purpose.  If you eat wheat, you get one kernel for one kernel.  If you plant wheat, you get a hundred kernels for one kernel.  The little red hen could see how profitable this situation could become and so she decided to plant the wheat.  But she needed someone to help her, so she went around among her friends in the barnyard and said, “Who will help me plant my wheat?”  For some reason she could not get even one of her friends interested.  She must have pointed out to them the possibility of getting a return of a hundred for one, but still no one wanted to be a part of the project and so she did it herself.

Then when the wheat began to grow, she needed somebody to help her care for the wheat.  This project now had all of the earmarks of a going concern, and so again she went around among her friends in the barnyard and said, “Who will help me care for  my wheat?”  But still no one was interested.  “Not I,” said the pig; “Not I,” said the goose; “Not I,” said the turkey.

When the harvesting time came, she made another canvass among her friends.  I suppose she reasoned that now that the wheat was ripe her friends could see the opportunity, but again no one was interested.  She did the same thing at the threshing time and at milling time and the baking time, but no one was interested.

But when the bread started coming out of the oven, she again went around among her friends in the barnyard and said, “Who will help me eat my bread?”  Then she discovered that a wonderful thing had happened.  Everyone seemed to have had a kind of miraculous change of heart.  Everyone now wanted to be a part of the project.  “I,” said the pig; “I,” said the goose; “I,” said the turkey.  Now her friends were not only interested, they actually seemed enthusiastic.

The Lord has a program just like that.  He says, “Who will help me to provide for those in need?  Who will help plant knowledge and faith into the lives of people?  Who will help me stir up activity and give encouragement to those who have problems?”  Sometimes the Lord has a lot of difficulty in getting his ideas over to us and we are not interested.

“Not I,” said Brother Sill; “Not I,” said Sister Jones; “Not I,” said Brother Smith.

Then I suppose that someday the Lord is going to say, “Who would like to live with me forever in the celestial kingdom?  Who would like to enjoy the satisfaction that comes from constructive service?”  Then I suppose we will find that a great change has taken place in us.  When we stand before God, there is not one person in this audience who will not then want to be a faithful, devoted, ardent, enthusiastic, industrious member of the Church.  But we must make up our minds before the baking has been completed.  For then it will be said, “The harvest is past, the summer is ended, and your souls not saved.” — Sterling W. Sill, “A Formula for Laying Up Treasures,” BYU Speeches of the Year, October 3, 1960, pp. 4-5