Quotes on Social Media

In our day it is easy to merely pretend to spend time with others. With the click of a mouse, we can “connect” with thousands of “friends” without ever having to face a single one of them.  Technology can be a wonderful thing, and it is very useful when we cannot be near our loved ones. My wife and I live far away from precious family members; we know how that is. However, I believe that we are not headed in the right direction, individually and as a society, when we connect with family or friends mostly by reposting humorous pictures, forwarding trivial things, or linking our loved ones to sites on the Internet.  I suppose there is a place for this kind of activity, but how much time are we willing to spend on it?  If we fail to give our best personal self and undivided time to those who are truly important to us, one day we will regret it. — President Dieter F. Uchtdorf, “Of Regrets and Resolutions,” General Conference, October 2012

The poor use of time is a close cousin of idleness.  As we follow the command to “cease to be idle” (D&C 88:124), we must be sure that being busy also equates to being productive.  For example, it is wonderful to have the means of instant communication quite literally at our fingertips, but let us be sure that we do not become compulsive fingertip communicators.  I sense that some are trapped in a new time-consuming addiction – one that enslaves us to be constantly checking and sending social messages and thus giving the false impression of being busy and productive.

There is much that is good with our easy access to communication and information. I have found it helpful to access research articles, conference talks, and ancestral records, and to receive e-mails, Facebook reminders, tweets, and texts.  As good as these things are, we cannot allow them to push to one side those things of greatest importance.  How sad it would be if the phone and computer, with all their sophistication, drowned out the simplicity of sincere prayer to a loving Father in Heaven.  Let us be as quick to kneel as we are to text. . . .

I know our greatest happiness comes as we tune in to the Lord (see Alma 37:37) and to those things which bring a lasting reward, rather than mindlessly tuning in to countless hours of status updates, Internet farming, and catapulting angry birds at concrete walls.  I urge each of us to take those things which rob us of precious time and determine to be their master, rather than allowing them through their addictive nature to be the master of us. — Elder Ian S. Ardern, “A Time to Prepare,” Ensign, November 2011, p. 32

Many who are in a spiritual drought and lack commitment have not necessarily been involved in major sins or transgressions, but they have made unwise choices.  Some are casual in their observance of sacred covenants.  Others spend most of their time giving first-class devotion to lesser causes.  Some allow intense cultural or political views to weaken their allegiance to the gospel of Jesus Christ.  Some have immersed themselves in Internet materials that magnify, exaggerate, and, in some cases, invent shortcomings of early Church leaders.  Then they draw incorrect conclusions that can affect testimony. Any who have made these choices can repent and be spiritually renewed. — Elder Quentin L. Cook, “Can Ye Feel So Now?” Ensign, November 2012