Turn Off to Tune In

Turn Off to Tune In

How weird is this? We are an internet media network and we are recommending that you turn off your computer. NOT RIGHT NOW! Hear us out first.

We don’t need to tell you that we are bombarded with technology. We are connected anytime we want to be. We are connected anywhere we want to be. It’s one of the great blessings of living at this time and also one of the challenges. We’ve all seen it, maybe even done it; a couple is having dinner in a restaurant. They sit across the table from each other, each of them focused on their smart phones. In the spirit of Matthew 7:1 (“Judge not, that ye not be judged.”), we will not jump to any definite conclusions.

  • Perhaps they are environmentally conscious and are opting to peruse the menu online rather than use a printed one.
  • Perhaps they are each shutting off their phones and the process is unbelievably time consuming involving umpteen keystrokes.
  • Perhaps they are searching for the correct pronunciation for “Escargot”, cause last time they accidently ordered snails.

Perhaps they have a very legitimate reason to be disconnected from each other, but more often than not the reasons are less than legitimate.

A while ago, a woman teaching a Young Adult Sunday School class coined the phrase, “Turn off to tune in”. Some of her students were using their phones during class to connect with people outside the class. They were not completely tuned in to what was happening around them. The students used their phones to access scriptures during the lesson, which is great, but the phones also proved to be a distraction for some.

The late musician John Lennon said, “Life is what happens to you while you’re making other plans.” That was a very poignant way of saying, stop and smell the roses or be in the moment.  Today we could say, life is what happens to you while you’re texting.

HERE’S AN IDEA

How do we turn off in order to tune in? Once per month members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints fast. They go without eating for 24 hours. Normally this is done on the first Sunday of the month. The benefits of fasting are many, but we won’t take the time here to discuss all of them. At the end of today’s blog you will see links for more information on this.

Here’s an idea. Once per month turn off your technical gadgets, your computer, smartphone, television, iPod, etc. Fast from technology for 24 hours. Fasting from food allows your body the chance to rest and rejuvenate. Turning off technology for 24 hours allows your mind, and spirit to rest and rejuvenate. With the noise of the world turned off for a day, you can tune in to things that may be passing you by the rest of the month.  A tech fast can help you remain grounded. It can remind you which things in life are truly important, but sometimes taken for granted. And more importantly, it teaches your smartphone who’s in charge.

Copyright © 2013 by Energy Media Works LLC

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TELL US ABOUT IT

If you’re thinking about trying a 24 hour tech fast, we would love to hear about it. Share your experience with the entire Mormon Media Network family. We wont expect to hear from you until after your fast, cause contacting us during your fast would just be against the tech fasting rules now wouldn’t it?

Simply write to us by replying below.

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INFORMATION ON FASTING:

http://mormonmedianetwork.com/media-categories/health/health-benefits-of-fasting/

http://www.lds.org/media-library/video/welfare?lang=eng#2011-05-50-fast-offerings-the-jerry-foote-family

 

Posted in Spirituality, Technology Tagged with: , ,

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